Jump to content
  • 0
IGNORED

acid damage


Pop Bumper Pete
 Share

Question

I pulled my Bally Star Trek out of storage
I had put an Altek board in it with a remote battery holder
the batteries had leaked, but not onto the board

I have noticed though that the acid has run down the negative wire, and I think has moved through the trace lines. you can see the trace leading to the negative pad for a memory cap is discolored, and the pad is funky. I have circled other places where the trace is discolored

any suggestions on my next move?

acid trip.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 1

in this specific case i would first have a go at scraping it clean with an xacto knife. 

the step up is either a fiberglass pencil or a scrap of 600grit wet and a bottle of ipa and wet sand it off.

once you have pretty copper - then re-tin the trace with solder.  

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1

You caught it at a good time. I would neutralise with acid and sand back to bare copper. Then re-tin or conformal coat. How old were the batteries, out of interest?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Wow!!!. How does that happen even with a remote battery holder and a new age board!!!.  Electricity.

Just a thought and please shoot me down but I've spent a fair time in the marine industry and there is a major metal destruction process called galvanic corrosion.

Loosely it's based on some metals react badly with others so there is a scale which metals are named 'noble" and which ones are less and are sacrificial.

I could babble about this for ages but bottom line is some metals like to attack others but when you introduce electricity of any sort it changes the whole chemistry.

I feel sorry for ya Pete but never store a game with any batteries/ electricity supply in it. I'm guessing if you thinly slice the remote battery supply leads open I'd love to know what you find?

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
7 minutes ago, Railways said:

I feel sorry for ya Pete but never store a game with any batteries/ electricity supply in it. I'm guessing if you thinly slice the remote battery supply leads open I'd love to know what you find?

 

the negative wire is green and fragile
just glad the other two game I have opened up recently have had no problems
I can replace an Altek board, harder to find a whitestar board

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
2 minutes ago, Pop Bumper Pete said:

the negative wire is green and fragile
just glad the other two game I have opened up recently have had no problems
I can replace an Altek board, harder to find a whitestar board

Bummer but that would back up why the negative pad is different and I'd bet that the other two affected trace areas are also "negative' affected.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

After having this happen with remote control gear way back, I learned that you have to think about plumbing with battery wires. Was the remote battery higher than the solder joints on the PCB? Even though the alkali can wick up wires, it can take longer or even be prevented if it has to fight gravity too.

 

I bought a tiny "dust blaster" - think sand blaster but more sized like an airbrush and super fine grit, that I am going to be trying out on a damaged PCB to see how well it works for removing the lacquer and corrosion. I bought it... 12 years ago and still have not got round to it yet 😄

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Back in the 80/90's when I was into RC aircraft, this also happened to our Ni-cad battery pack & alway's on the Negative wire, If left unnoticed it migrated though the battery plug & made it's way though the switch to the RC Receiver. We called it THE BLACK DEATH as it resulted in a loss of control, destroying the aircraft.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
17 hours ago, Railways said:

Wow!!!. How does that happen even with a remote battery holder and a new age board!!!.  Electricity.

Just a thought and please shoot me down but I've spent a fair time in the marine industry and there is a major metal destruction process called galvanic corrosion.

Loosely it's based on some metals react badly with others so there is a scale which metals are named 'noble" and which ones are less and are sacrificial.

I could babble about this for ages but bottom line is some metals like to attack others but when you introduce electricity of any sort it changes the whole chemistry.

I feel sorry for ya Pete but never store a game with any batteries/ electricity supply in it. I'm guessing if you thinly slice the remote battery supply leads open I'd love to know what you find?

 

Dis-similar metal reaction is something that was a concern years ago but far less of a concern these days in manufacturing. Why do batteries leak so quickly these days, cost.

Why are battery terminals and the plates in a car battery made of lead or at least plated in lead and the plates live a life in acid but we take lead out of solder and what is happening now on new electronic products? One thing about lead, it doesn't corrode and is near inert.

Chemistry is something that can't be changed but you can learn to work with it. We did in the past but that all changes with the need for more money from less cost when it comes to manufacturing. We live in a throw away society and things aren't made to last or be repaired and we are all paying for it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...