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This area is for good ideas, devices and general help for the creation of HomeBrew pinball and is not machine specific.

 

It is a collection of ideas and devices that have come up in HomeBrew posts that could be an aid to future HomeBrew makers.

 

Feel free to add to this list if you think you have an idea or device that you think could aid other HomeBrew pinball makers.

 

To start this list off here is a PC program for making .WAV sound effects that allows you to vary the sounds to your liking and capture it for use on the sound effects boards that use .WAV files as there playable folders.

 

If you have a .mp3 sound player simply convert the finished .WAV you created into a .mp3 for your use.

 

http://www.bfxr.net/

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I bought some of these addressable LEDs to play with.

(Ebay item number 262793423326) It was mentioned elsewhere that they might fit under playfield posts but unfortunately they don't. They have a string of three addressable LEDs on each board. They might be good for pop bumpers though.

b65b5c93ee753cf7d9df5e0282879945.jpg

 

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I bought some of these addressable LEDs to play with.

(Ebay item number 262793423326) It was mentioned elsewhere that they might fit under playfield posts but unfortunately they don't. They have a string of three addressable LEDs on each board. They might be good for pop bumpers though.

b65b5c93ee753cf7d9df5e0282879945.jpg

 

 

It would be good if you could bring over the sound player to this thread Kev and anything else you think would be best suited here.

 

I have asked a mod to paste this thread so it should become a pasted thread soon.

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255 sound wav board on Ebay (item number 222180828182)

It has 8 input lines that can be used in any combination to play all the sounds that are stored on an SD card. It doesn't have serial input but uses a binary input to access each sound.

For example. Inputs 2 and 5 would play sound 34.f73f70b8c018c41276a27e203d97a1ab.jpg

 

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I bought some of these addressable RGB LEDs for my Thomas The Tank Engine pinball project and they seem to work well. No item number as there are so many types to chose from. I had a string of 21 and an Arduino Leonardo micro all running off the USB port on my laptop with no issues. While they're cheap and easy to use they are fiddly to wire up being about 10mm diameter. They use the sk6812 chip onboard which is compatible with the ws2812 and associated Adafruit NeoPixel library for the Arduino. 6e43535e8db7f269280b81765b727a6a.jpg

 

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.....

To start this list off here is a PC program for making .WAV sound effects that allows you to vary the sounds to your liking and capture it for use on the sound effects boards that use .WAV files as there playable folders.

 

If you have a .mp3 sound player simply convert the finished .WAV you created into a .mp3 for your use.

 

http://www.bfxr.net/

 

That's a great link, I was shocked to read the first line:

"Bfxr is an elaboration of the glorious Sfxr, the program of choice for many people looking to make sound effects for computer games. "

I've been using sfxr for almost 10 years, so great to see someone has expanded it, will definitely look at using bfxr now :)

And yes that statement is 100% correct, it is the #1 go to program for indie game developers looking to make basic sound effects.

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Switch bounce is a major problem with electronics.

 

While the switch on the playfield may look like it only works once, in actual fact, the switch may make and break the input signal multiple times resulting in something like a pinball switch multiple scoring or worse case, fire a solenoid multiple times. Both cases we do not want.

 

Hitting something like a spinner without a de-bounce circuit could result in a spinner scoring multiple times each spin and a spinner required to score once per revolution could end up with the electronics recording a hundred score pulses instead of 20-30.

 

That is a problem created with electronics. It sees everything, input wise and is super fast so it presumes are pulses are valid.

 

This is where a de-bounce circuit comes in to play.

 

It "cleans" the switch closure to result in just one input that the electronics sees.

 

There are many ways to "fix" this problem but what is useful for your application depends on what electronics you are driving.

 

If you elect to go the software solution, here are a couple of software solutions depending on the controller system you are using...

 

http://hackaday.com/2010/11/09/debounce-code-one-post-to-rule-them-all/

 

.

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Nice. I would really like a one of 8 input to select the files much like the sound selector Big Kev put up solely because that is so much easier for me to use but this is good.

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Nice. I would really like a one of 8 input to select the files much like the sound selector Big Kev put up solely because that is so much easier for me to use but this is good.

 

Digital HD Video Player 5 triggerable inputs.. Bit pricey though...

http://www.frightprops.com/video-visual-effects/digital-video-players/triggerable-digital-video-player-hd.html

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Ideally, it would be a RPi using a GPIO pin to trigger each video for me but I can't find any such project someone has made yet.

 

When you do, post it here ! It would be handy, and easier to use if you cant do a serial link to it. The other trick is if you can do the serial link code to it, use the IO on the Pi as the discrete input to serial encoder ! simplz

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Switch bounce is a major problem with electronics.

 

While the switch on the playfield may look like it only works once, in actual fact, the switch may make and break the input signal multiple times resulting in something like a pinball switch multiple scoring or worse case, fire a solenoid multiple times. Both cases we do not want.

 

Hitting something like a spinner without a de-bounce circuit could result in a spinner scoring multiple times each spin and a spinner required to score once per revolution could end up with the electronics recording a hundred score pulses instead of 20-30.

 

That is a problem created with electronics. It sees everything, input wise and is super fast so it presumes are pulses are valid.

 

This is where a de-bounce circuit comes in to play.

 

It "cleans" the switch closure to result in just one input that the electronics sees.

 

There are many ways to "fix" this problem but what is useful for your application depends on what electronics you are driving.

 

If you elect to go the software solution, here are a couple of software solutions depending on the controller system you are using...

 

http://hackaday.com/2010/11/09/debounce-code-one-post-to-rule-them-all/

 

.

http://www.aussiearcade.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=62849&d=1397117713

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attachment.php?attachmentid=62849&d=1397117713

 

 

 

 

Well that will work however I think 1 second will result in a lot of switches not scoring but I think the biggest problem is just how many of those circuits you will need for a machine.

 

I think a better approach would be to use that 555 timer to make an astable timer to make the clock pulse to run a collection of MC14490.

 

Each MC14490 gate will do exactly the same thing but you get 6 switches per chip that way.

 

As quoted from the data sheet of the MC14490....

 

"The digital contact bounce eliminator circuit takes an input signal from a bouncing contact

and generates a clean digital signal four clock periods after the input has

stabilized. The bounce eliminator circuit will remove bounce on both the

“make” and the “break” of a contact closure.

The clock for operation of the MC14490 is derived from an internal R-C oscillator which requires

only an external capacitor to adjust for the desired operating frequency (bounce delay). The clock may also be driven from an external clock".

 

That external clock can be the 555 timer and your time interval can be controlled by adjusting the R-C network pot.

 

The time interval of de-bounce on the MC14490 is the length of "4 clock pulses". Slowing down the pulses created by the 555 astable circuit will lengthen the time the 6 switches connected to it will de-bounce.

 

That one 555 astable circuit could be used to drive the clock pulse input on multiple MC14490 chips and each chip can do 6 circuits.

 

10 X MC14490 chips is nearly the 64 switches a pinball can decode. Doing this with indervidual 555 circuits would require 60 X 555 timer circuits but while the indervidual 555 circuit can have it's de-bounce duration adjusted by itself, the MC14490 cannot but neither can a pinball machine board.

 

Is it now becoming apparient why I have choosen to use a cheap old pinball board set for a homebrew?.

 

Just kidding. That answer has more to do with my hatred of software and love of hardware than anything else.

 

I'm actually digging into this subject for my own use as things become more complete I build and this would save me building multiple de-bounce circuits per project like i have always done in the past.

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255 sound wav board on Ebay (item number 222180828182)

It has 8 input lines that can be used in any combination to play all the sounds that are stored on an SD card. It doesn't have serial input but uses a binary input to access each sound.

For example. Inputs 2 and 5 would play sound 34.f73f70b8c018c41276a27e203d97a1ab.jpg

 

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

I'm going to use a 74ls595 serial to parallel shift out register ic to drive the sound board. The 74ls595 will go through two 74ls06 hex inverters (8 bits) then to the sound board as the sound inputs are active low.

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ShiftOut

I suppose you could drive leds this way too as shown in the examples.

Cheers Trev

 

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I'm going to use a 74ls595 serial to parallel shift out register ic to drive the sound board. The 74ls595 will go through two 74ls06 hex inverters (8 bits) then to the sound board as the sound inputs are active low.

 

 

Cool, let me know how this board goes as it really appears to be a good, cheap solution.

 

My intention is to use it to replace a Williams sound board and use the sound triggers off the MPU board/ driver board off the Williams board set to drive the sound board inputs direct.

 

Once I work out how to replace the Williams sound board I see no reason why the sounds can't be replaced on all early Williams pinballs.

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attachment.php?attachmentid=62849&d=1397117713

 

 

 

 

Well that will work however I think 1 second will result in a lot of switches not scoring but I think the biggest problem is just how many of those circuits you will need for a machine.

 

I think a better approach would be to use that 555 timer to make an astable timer to make the clock pulse to run a collection of MC14490.

 

Each MC14490 gate will do exactly the same thing but you get 6 switches per chip that way.

 

As quoted from the data sheet of the MC14490....

 

"The digital contact bounce eliminator circuit takes an input signal from a bouncing contact

and generates a clean digital signal four clock periods after the input has

stabilized. The bounce eliminator circuit will remove bounce on both the

“make” and the “break” of a contact closure.

The clock for operation of the MC14490 is derived from an internal R-C oscillator which requires

only an external capacitor to adjust for the desired operating frequency (bounce delay). The clock may also be driven from an external clock".

 

That external clock can be the 555 timer and your time interval can be controlled by adjusting the R-C network pot.

 

The time interval of de-bounce on the MC14490 is the length of "4 clock pulses". Slowing down the pulses created by the 555 astable circuit will lengthen the time the 6 switches connected to it will de-bounce.

 

That one 555 astable circuit could be used to drive the clock pulse input on multiple MC14490 chips and each chip can do 6 circuits.

 

10 X MC14490 chips is nearly the 64 switches a pinball can decode. Doing this with indervidual 555 circuits would require 60 X 555 timer circuits but while the indervidual 555 circuit can have it's de-bounce duration adjusted by itself, the MC14490 cannot but neither can a pinball machine board.

 

Is it now becoming apparient why I have choosen to use a cheap old pinball board set for a homebrew?.

 

Just kidding. That answer has more to do with my hatred of software and love of hardware than anything else.

 

I'm actually digging into this subject for my own use as things become more complete I build and this would save me building multiple de-bounce circuits per project like i have always done in the past.

 

The on time is determined by the rc network pins 6 and 7

I use these as a 100ms one shot.555 timers I think can run at about 3 megahertz these days so timers of microseconds can be achieved.

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The on time is determined by the rc network pins 6 and 7

I use these as a 100ms one shot.555 timers I think can run at about 3 megahertz these days so timers of microseconds can be achieved.

 

Problem using a 555 is it can re-trigger within the outout span (Different from being held on).

You'd be better using 74hc221 for 100ms, As they are a Dual non-retriggerable monostable multivibrator with Schmitt-trigger input (b).

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Your not going to get a much simpler circuit. It is using just one of the 6 gates found in either a 4049 or 4050, depending on whether you require switching to low or high), and a handful of passive parts.

 

http://www.labbookpages.co.uk/electronics/files/debounce/debounceCircuit.png

 

Your time is set by the value of C1 and R2 however for really small delay periods, as CMOS chips always have a small resistor already on the inputs, you can do without R2.

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Problem using a 555 is it can re-trigger within the outout span (Different from being held on)

.

You'd be better using 74hc221 for 100ms, As they are a Dual non-retriggerable monostable multivibrator with Schmitt-trigger input (b).

 

I don't want to be pedantic but in regards to the 555

Circuit you are wrong, all pulses inside the timed output window are ignored.

The circuit wasn't handed over in speculation that it might

work it actually works.

I have used this circuit mainly for pop bumpers in several pinballs.

Also a 555 can drive a relay or power Transistor without a buffer circuit...don't underestimate the mighty 555

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