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Cameron Silver


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Hello guys,

My understanding is that Cameron was lead programmer on CV

He wrote the home rom WHEN he was working at WMS. He has stated this more than once.

Seeing the games he has made and knowing him he put things in games that he always wanted to do. So he had a bit of input in the design. Jpop and cameron worked very closely on CV.

 

I will send a copy of this to him and see what he has to say.

 

damien

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I wont pretend I know the fellah but from the interviews I've seen and heard he seems like a extremely intelligent and well mannered bloke.

 

Agree with you there mate, hang on... i will just give him a call on the moby. :lol

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Well the source code notes show exactly what he did and didn't do on the programming.

 

Also when he applied for a job with us, it was clear he did not do all the software and clear he did not design the game.

 

 

Actually, as an ex-Williams/Bally employee at the time working in the pinball department at the time, Cameron was, in fact, the software lead on CV.

 

And it should be noted, that Popaduik often gave/gives credit to his entire team as GAME designers, since many people have input on a finished game than just the single person who might have drawn up the playfield. Of course, different "Game Daddies" operated differently; some were true "everyone works for me" kind of designers, others were "I just draw playfields, you guys do the rules", a majority of them walked the middle ground; granted, they were team leads, but often took suggestions from the various people who worked on the game, and often, traditional "game designer created" elements (such as playfield toys and shots) were indeed dreamed up and tweaked by various team members during team discussions.

 

In other words, staff position names and table credits are NOT absolute.

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Well the source code notes show exactly what he did and didn't do on the programming.

 

Which would be all of the game-side stuff, not just the Ringmaster.

 

Thats for letting me know who did the Home rom, as he should not have source code in his possession as he is no longer an employee of WMS.

 

As others have stated, I did the Cirqus home ROM in 2000 while I was working at WMS. I didn't release it for several years due to being quite burned out from pinball, and having no real test data for it.

 

John and I absolutely designed the game together, with him concentrating more towards the mechanical layout, and myself on the rules. The headers in the source code say "Software Design" rather than "Software AND Design" simply because those were generated when I started the project (before I'd even finished working on Stiff) and I had no idea at that time how big a role I would play in the project. When everything was all done, there was little reason to go back and change it.

 

Naturally I have no way to prove any of this, but why would I lie? Even though I adore Cirqus, it performed terribly on location and was not considered a success. On Scared Stuff I did most of the "effects" programming, but had only a small impact on rules (most were pretty well designed when I came on the project).

 

All roles were pretty loose for each pinball project I worked on, and I consider myself very fortunate enough to be able to say that. Everyone on the team had important contributions to make, and everyone had a say in the finished product. Some designers were dictators, but not John or Dennis. The titles assigned to design-team roles are mostly just guides, but should never be considered absolute.

 

Wayne, you now have all of Williams' IP - that's fine. But I'm sorry, it doesn't make you an expert. I don't doubt that you like going through that stuff, but using it to back up nonsense makes you look a little foolish.

 

 

Edit: Apologies to the original poster for not answering his question! Yes, I am now working at Raw Thrills, which is run by Eugene Jarvis and Andy Eloff. The company does (for the most part) coin-op arcade games. The first game I worked on here was the driving game "The Fast And The Furious: Drift", and am now working on a new product which will debut at the IAAPA trade show in two weeks.

 

After Williams stopped making pinball in 1999 I had to remain at WMS, since my VISA only permitted me to work there. Once I got the Green Card I left WMS to work at Cisco Systems (with several other ex-Williams guys). After slightly over 4 years at Cisco I moved to Midway and worked on NBA: Ballers Phenom (September 2005), and then finally started at Raw in January 2007 .. which is where I am today :)

 

 

Cameron.

Edited by buzzneon
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Which would be all of the game-side stuff, not just the Ringmaster.

 

 

 

As others have stated, I did the Cirqus home ROM in 2000 while I was working at WMS. I didn't release it for several years due to being quite burned out from pinball, and having no real test data for it.

 

John and I absolutely designed the game together, with him concentrating more towards the mechanical layout, and myself on the rules. The headers in the source code say "Software Design" rather than "Software AND Design" simply because those were generated when I started the project (before I'd even finished working on Stiff) and I had no idea at that time how big a role I would play in the project. When everything was all done, there was little reason to go back and change it.

 

Naturally I have no way to prove any of this, but why would I lie? Even though I adore Cirqus, it performed terribly on location and was not considered a success. On Scared Stuff I did most of the "effects" programming, but had only a small impact on rules (most were pretty well designed when I came on the project).

 

All roles were pretty loose for each pinball project I worked on, and I consider myself very fortunate enough to be able to say that. Everyone on the team had important contributions to make, and everyone had a say in the finished product. Some designers were dictators, but not John or Dennis. The titles assigned to design-team roles are mostly just guides, but should never be considered absolute.

 

Wayne, you now have all of Williams' IP - that's fine. But I'm sorry, it doesn't make you an expert. I don't doubt that you like going through that stuff, but using it to back up nonsense makes you look a little foolish.

 

Cameron.

 

hey cameron thanks a bunch for taking the time to post your experiences with CV and some culture of the days of WMS.

 

regards and best of luck with your future.

 

nuggy

 

PS have you seen coconut island!!!! :D

 

what do you think if you have ?

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thanks Cameron for bringing the real facts to the story

was great talking at expo too

 

mark

 

 

Ps. Is it true that you've applied for a position to move back to Oz and get back into pinball? :)

 

yes and I have accepted his offer to come here and clean pinballs ...

and drink my coffee.....

 

nah only kidding :lol:lol

Edited by markc
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Once I got the Green Card I left WMS to work at Cisco Systems (with several other ex-Williams guys). After slightly over 4 years at Cisco I moved to Midway and worked on NBA: Ballers Phenom (September 2005), and then finally started at Raw in January 2007 .. which is where I am today :)

 

Cameron.

 

Cool, what did you do at Cisco? :unsure

 

Your resume would be looking pretty sweet :p

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Which would be all of the game-side stuff, not just the Ringmaster.

 

 

 

As others have stated, I did the Cirqus home ROM in 2000 while I was working at WMS. I didn't release it for several years due to being quite burned out from pinball, and having no real test data for it.

 

John and I absolutely designed the game together, with him concentrating more towards the mechanical layout, and myself on the rules. The headers in the source code say "Software Design" rather than "Software AND Design" simply because those were generated when I started the project (before I'd even finished working on Stiff) and I had no idea at that time how big a role I would play in the project. When everything was all done, there was little reason to go back and change it.

 

Naturally I have no way to prove any of this, but why would I lie? Even though I adore Cirqus, it performed terribly on location and was not considered a success. On Scared Stuff I did most of the "effects" programming, but had only a small impact on rules (most were pretty well designed when I came on the project).

 

All roles were pretty loose for each pinball project I worked on, and I consider myself very fortunate enough to be able to say that. Everyone on the team had important contributions to make, and everyone had a say in the finished product. Some designers were dictators, but not John or Dennis. The titles assigned to design-team roles are mostly just guides, but should never be considered absolute.

 

Wayne, you now have all of Williams' IP - that's fine. But I'm sorry, it doesn't make you an expert. I don't doubt that you like going through that stuff, but using it to back up nonsense makes you look a little foolish.

 

 

Edit: Apologies to the original poster for not answering his question! Yes, I am now working at Raw Thrills, which is run by Eugene Jarvis and Andy Eloff. The company does (for the most part) coin-op arcade games. The first game I worked on here was the driving game "The Fast And The Furious: Drift", and am now working on a new product which will debut at the IAAPA trade show in two weeks.

 

After Williams stopped making pinball in 1999 I had to remain at WMS, since my VISA only permitted me to work there. Once I got the Green Card I left WMS to work at Cisco Systems (with several other ex-Williams guys). After slightly over 4 years at Cisco I moved to Midway and worked on NBA: Ballers Phenom (September 2005), and then finally started at Raw in January 2007 .. which is where I am today :)

 

 

Cameron.

 

great post! hope to see more of you around here :D

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Which would be all of the game-side stuff, not just the Ringmaster.

 

 

 

As others have stated, I did the Cirqus home ROM in 2000 while I was working at WMS. I didn't release it for several years due to being quite burned out from pinball, and having no real test data for it.

 

John and I absolutely designed the game together, with him concentrating more towards the mechanical layout, and myself on the rules. The headers in the source code say "Software Design" rather than "Software AND Design" simply because those were generated when I started the project (before I'd even finished working on Stiff) and I had no idea at that time how big a role I would play in the project. When everything was all done, there was little reason to go back and change it.

 

Naturally I have no way to prove any of this, but why would I lie? Even though I adore Cirqus, it performed terribly on location and was not considered a success. On Scared Stuff I did most of the "effects" programming, but had only a small impact on rules (most were pretty well designed when I came on the project).

 

All roles were pretty loose for each pinball project I worked on, and I consider myself very fortunate enough to be able to say that. Everyone on the team had important contributions to make, and everyone had a say in the finished product. Some designers were dictators, but not John or Dennis. The titles assigned to design-team roles are mostly just guides, but should never be considered absolute.

 

Wayne, you now have all of Williams' IP - that's fine. But I'm sorry, it doesn't make you an expert. I don't doubt that you like going through that stuff, but using it to back up nonsense makes you look a little foolish.

 

 

Edit: Apologies to the original poster for not answering his question! Yes, I am now working at Raw Thrills, which is run by Eugene Jarvis and Andy Eloff. The company does (for the most part) coin-op arcade games. The first game I worked on here was the driving game "The Fast And The Furious: Drift", and am now working on a new product which will debut at the IAAPA trade show in two weeks.

 

After Williams stopped making pinball in 1999 I had to remain at WMS, since my VISA only permitted me to work there. Once I got the Green Card I left WMS to work at Cisco Systems (with several other ex-Williams guys). After slightly over 4 years at Cisco I moved to Midway and worked on NBA: Ballers Phenom (September 2005), and then finally started at Raw in January 2007 .. which is where I am today :)

 

 

Cameron.

 

 

Great to hear the facts straight from the source. Thanks for clearing that up, Cameron. A very insightful first post ! I'll bet you have many great stories to tell about the "good old days" :badgrin

 

I enjoyed listening to the audio from Expo2008, especially the P2000 talk during Nucore's presentation.

 

Should say a big "thank you" for the work on CV and SS - My favorite DMDs - especially the Home Roms in the CV :)

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Wayne, you now have all of Williams' IP - that's fine. But I'm sorry, it doesn't make you an expert. I don't doubt that you like going through that stuff, but using it to back up nonsense makes you look a little foolish.

 

It bores my looking through that crap in fact, what makes people look foolish is hanging out trying to be a celebrity.

 

Cameron it was clear when Myself and Our Programmer spoke to you that you did some rules for games but had NOTHING to do with the operating System.

 

All i said was you didn't design the game, if you did software or software design that's fine but you were no game designer.

 

Actually, as an ex-Williams/Bally employee at the time working in the pinball department at the time, Cameron was, in fact, the software lead on CV.

 

And it should be noted, that Popaduik often gave/gives credit to his entire team as GAME designers, since many people have input on a finished game than just the single person who might have drawn up the playfield. Of course, different "Game Daddies" operated differently; some were true "everyone works for me" kind of designers, others were "I just draw playfields, you guys do the rules", a majority of them walked the middle ground; granted, they were team leads, but often took suggestions from the various people who worked on the game, and often, traditional "game designer created" elements (such as playfield toys and shots) were indeed dreamed up and tweaked by various team members during team discussions.

 

In other words, staff position names and table credits are NOT absolute.

 

 

Glad all you Ex Williams Staff are visiting our little Australian Arcade Forum.

 

Does this one have a name?

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