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Found 8 results

  1. Im feeling somewhat nostalgic and searching for pics and vids from back in the 80's Sydney in particular Anyone got some good leads ? Vid about 90's was interesting
  2. Tron! I won this machine in auction in 2012 for $506. It belonged to a local movie director and he had it in his mancave which wasn't the ideal location for a cabinet made of particle board! The floor was damp and I believe they had a big party and destroyed a part of the roof which let even more moisture. See the pics for the description. It did run for a little bit when I bought it but eventually it went up in smoke and it's has been dragged around with me since. Every time I moved it I said to myself this will be the last time it will be moved without falling to bits, because it was, and it would leave a trail of particle board across the shed floors like a crusty snail. So 9 years later it is time to get it Tron Upright #17549 sorted...
  3. Been a while since I've posted an arcade project and I really wanted to test the new forum software. This cab has been sitting in my garage for years as a long non-started project. I recently took a couple of days off (in lockdown) and decided it finally needed some love. Originally a container import out of Italy, it arrived non working. Italian Gaming Licence ID: 0 There was no life in the 35 year old Hantarex Power Supply rattling around loose in the cab and the Orion tube/chassis would also not fire up. Knowing virtually nothing about the electronics on those particular parts, combined with the age and state of them I ended up removing them from the cabinet. 0 I gave the cabinet a thorough clean as I'd never seen one like this and I loved the artwork and style of the cabinet. I had to repair the front frame of the monitor mount. Its made out of MDF and in glued and screwed into the sides but has started to collapse. I ended up filling it with MDF glue, clamping it back into shape and letting it set overnight. I think its stronger than new now ๐Ÿ˜‰ 0 Unholy of holies I have a stash of 19" CRT PC monitors so I decased one and slotted it into the chassis frame. A little diligence in cutting some of the plastics and it fit like a glove. Yeah yeah I know Arcade Tubes are far and away better and several of my other cabs sport them but I was in lockdown with no access to any other parts so sue me ๐Ÿ˜‰ The control panel is covered with a sheet of acrylic now as the original underneath has many marks from cigarette burns. Notice the cigarette holder on the right. That'd never fly in Australia. I gave it all a good clean, removing the rusted bolts and giving them the treatment. The treatment being locked into a cordless drill and spun against some finishing paper. Then undercoated and sprayed black. As usual they came up really well. The cigarette holder was removed and polished. The bolts for those were also rusted but I sanded them and then clearcoated to prevent them rusting up again. I'd retained the jamma harness and all of the micro-switch connections had been soldered on. Good practice but a bitch for replacement and maintenance. I was lucky in that there were no broken connections. I re-built and old Dell PC I have a few of. Windows 7, Mame and MalaFE all configured and ready to go then interfaced it all with a J-Pac. Hands down the easiest way to get your controls running. Some test drives, configuring a few of the controls at a global level and everything is working as expected. Another advantage of the J-Pac is the Shift Key function so I don't have to drill holes and add extra buttons for Exit and Coin Inserts. Further to this the coin mechs were still all wired up to the harness and dropping a 50 euro cent coin into the slots triggers a credit. Love it although I only have 5 of the coins. Thinking about modifying them to use the 100 custom tokens I have but with the J-Pac's shift keys it would purely be a novelty. Note the Price on the Inserts. I do need to replace the bulbs in there so they look nicely backlit. (Note this photo is before I cleaned it all) I've configured the PC to start up after power loss and MalaFE to start up with Windows. The cab has a power socket on the top with a fused switch. I wired that into a 4 port powerboard that I mounted inside the cab. This powers the monitor, PC and eventually a flourescent tube for the marquee. The original was practically disintegrating. Unfortunately the marquee (glass) was broken. So I scanned it with a flatbed scanner and have been restoring the image after I vectorised it. It's almost complete and I'll send it off to be printed on a new acrylie marquee to fit. Things to complete: All up this cab has 3 locks on it. The Coin Door, The door to the cointray and the back panel which is metal. I'm going to purchase 3 that are keyed alike Install marquee light Get Marquee printed There is also a mount for a volume control. I'll be installed one of DavidAVD's in-line volume controls into that in the next few days which will allow me to control the volume on the original single jamma powered speaker. There is a chunk of chipboard missing from the top. I'm of two minds on whether to repair it or not. All up I'm very happy with the result and it plays really well. I customised the Layout file with my name ๐Ÿ˜‰ Note you can see the wall behind it as I haven't put the back panel back on yet. Its outside after being cleaned. Cheers, Brad
  4. My latest project and its been a while between them for sure. I'd seen some examples of similar things like this before so started doing some research on what it takes to make something like this. I tend to be obsessive when I start something and went all in. I based my project on the one outlined here: https://www.brainy-bits.com/post/mak...h-256-rgb-leds Like the author above I made mine a 16 x 16 array which is the general size of most early arcade sprites until tech got better and it went to 32 x 32 and then even more. 16 x 16 was practical from a sizing perspective and especially since this was my first attempt. You're not limited in your sizing but would need to modify your materials list to suit anything different. Materials List: 1 x Arduino Mega 2560 (You can use a UNO but get far less storage so your call) 1 x 5 meter Roll of WS2812B Non-Waterproof LED Strip (These are individually addressable) 1 x 240v to DC 5V 10A power Supply 1 x Kmart Anko 12" x 12" Shadow Box Frame 1 x Can of Frosted Glass Spraypaint 1 x Sheet of 5mm Art Foamboard (A1 size) 3 x 20cm Male-Male Dupont Wires for Breadboard (Optional) 15 x LED Strip Light Connector Cables (Optional) Arduino Mega 2560: There are projects out there that use a Raspberry Pi and other types of boards but the Arduino is really cheap and reliable. Also the code uses Flash Ram to store the data. Differences: UNO Flash 32k bytes compared to only 2k bytes of SRAM The Arduino MEGA has 256k bytes and 8k bytes of SRAM Whatever your choice, you will need to modify your code to suit. Power Supply: That's a beefy power supply but 256 LED's is a lot of lighting. The generally accepted method for calculating power requirements is: You need to know the required current (Amps or milliamps) for the LEDs. Typically, you can estimate 20mA (0.02 Amps) for one regular LED or 60mA for an RGB LED. In this build we have 256 LEDs. If they're all lit at 100% brightness and white in color, then the total power consumption would be around 16A. (60mA x 256) / 100 = 15.36Amps. Remember these are 5 volt NOT 12 volt leds Since Iรขโ‚ฌโ„ขm only use 15% brightness and not all the LEDs will be lit up white at any time, Iรขโ‚ฌโ„ขm using a 5V 10A power supply which is more than enough for my purposes. (I'm sure people with far more experience will chime in here) Panel Cutting: If you're lucky enough to have a router, cnc or laser cutter you could create your lighting matrix board using those. You could even in theory print one with a 3D Printer. Either way to look good it needs to be very accurate as you'll be lighting this from behind so every defect is immediately noticeable. I used a laser cutter but its only a low power model. Fortunately the work area is 400mm x 430mm and I needed 306mm x 306mm so perfect. I originally wanted to use soft timber for my array but my cutter is too low powered and the amount of passes required scorched the timber too much. A little experimentation with settings and materials found that black 5mm foam board works perfectly. I used Lightburn Software to create the cutting templates. Lightburn has a handy array creation function, so I set 2 burn paths. One for the full square and then another for the 256 squares representing CRT pixels. Note I said 2 templates as I made one for mounting the LEDS and a top one for the CRT pixel representation just like in the linked original project although he has 3 layers and I only have 2. The Anko Frame is only so deep but it still worked very well. LED Bottom Template: The squares are 6mm to seat the LEDS in snugly. Since the core is foam and foam contracts under heat I had to experiment on distance between each square on the top pixel layer so that it didn't burn through to the other side. If this happens light will bleed into the cell next to it ruining the effect. Distances ended up being 14.5mm squares with a distance between the centre of each LED being 16.8mm. This is the STD distance between each LED in a 5 meter WS2812B roll that I've found. Wall thickness is roughly 2.3mm, Based on my laser cutter, material and settings each panel took 1 hour to cut. It is set and forget though ๐Ÿ˜‰ Here's the cutter in action! Here's the final result! Construction: Now the LED strips are 3 pin. 1 x 5volt, 1 x Ground and 1 x data. This is the WS2812B spec. One downfall of this is that if a single LED or resistor fails on a strip, anything after it will stop working. The WS2813 spec LED's avoid this by having 4 pins, doubling the data link. If a unit fails, it juts won't light up anymore but the rest will. This of course would still be insightly but at least it will still work. For construction, you need to cut the LED strip into lengths of 16 LED's. The strips have 3 copper points between each light. You cut down the middle for each cut giving you enough surface area to achieve a connection. You'll layout and connect the strips in a backwards and forwards pattern snaking down the panel until complete. Like below. --------------> <-------------- --------------> <-------------- Now if you're like me and solder like a gorilla, the optional quick connects are recommended. This allows a solder free connection from one link to the next. Here is the result. Since the Arduino is powered by 5 volt USB, like the project site linked I spliced a spare old USB cable to fit both into the Arduino AND the power supply adapter provided. The power supply can now power both the Arduino and the light strips at the same time. I taped down the strips as I went as they tend to curl up, especially when the joiners are attached. I ended up saving the tape as a good solution to keeping it all in place. Connect the 5volt and Ground wires to the provided harness connector on the 1st strip. The data wire, goes straight into Pin 3 on the Arduino which is the data output pin we're using in the program. Shadow Box: The shadow box is essentially a deep photo frame. I picked a Kmart brand Anko 12" (30cm) x 12" version. Take the glass out and spray one side with the frosted glass spray paint. Only give it a light coat so that it doesn't run and coats evenly. I gave it 4 coats and waited an hour between each. This gave the perfect result. Once ready assemble all the parts into the frame. Frosted Glass first, followed by Top Large Grid, then the RGB LED grid with everything attached. You can then re-attach the back with some padding to hold everything in place if required. I still need to work out the best method for being having the power supply cable neatly integrated. Programming: Last but not least we need to provide the Ardunio with something to display onto your brand new light panel. Since my original intent was classic arcade game sprites, my goal was to create as many as I liked. The code uses an array of #rgb colour values like is often used for building websites. You define the colour for each LED. You can get tricky with other values such as brightness, repetition, patterns, fading etc but lets start with a static colour. Looking at the code below you can see the RGB values organised in a 16 x 16 array of 256 values. 0x000000 = Black or for RBG LEDS turn off. 0xcccccc = Silver or Grey 0x0066cc = A shade of blue 0xff0000 = A shade of Red // Create the array of retro arcade characters and store it in Flash memory const long DigDug01[] PROGMEM = { 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000 }; However making these by hand is not only difficult and confusing but damn tedious. So I started with sprite sheets I sourced from https://www.spriters-resource.com/arcade/ I thought the grid pattern mandated an easy solution in using Excel to create the sprite maps. So using the sprite sheets as a reference I then created using colours in excel, replicas of the sprites: But then I wanted an automated way to generate the RGB code values above so created a Macro that grabs the referenced cell colour and displays it. I also used the Excel CONCAT formula to add the 0x prefix and the trailing comma so all I had to due was cut and paste the values straight into the Arduino IDE. Now I can get really tricky and make the spreadsheet create the entire needed code but I'm not up to that yet, so in the meantime it's semi manual. The sprites aren't much other than a still picture without simulating motion. this technique uses stop motion effectively so for any movements you need to create a sprite for each change. String them together much like a cartoon and you have your movement. In the Dig Dug example there are only 2 sprite sheets I've created and I alternate between them to simulate movement exactly how it looks on an arcade monitor. In the code I call Sprite Sheet 1 to display and then sprite sheet 2 and tell it to repeat 8 times. // Put DigDug first frame for(int passtime = 0; passtime < 8; passtime++) { // The value 8 here can be changed to whatever you like but here is says run this entire sequence of code 8 times. FastLED.clear(); for(int i = 0; i < NUM_LEDS; i++) { // Telling the program to use the number of LEDS stated at the start of the program leds[i] = pgm_read_dword(&(DigDug01[i])); // DigDug01 here is the 1st Sprite Array Name above. } FastLED.show(); // Display the lights delay(250); // 250 Millisecond delay before moving to the next below // Put DigDug second frame FastLED.clear(); // Clear the lights turning them off in readyness for the next frame for(int i = 0; i < NUM_LEDS; i++) { leds[i] = pgm_read_dword(&(DigDug02[i])); //DigDug01 here is the 2nd Sprite Array Name above } FastLED.show(); delay(250); 250 Millisecond delay before moving to the next } Important Point: The Code above is going to use those colour values in strict order. Now since you HAVE to string your lights in a single unbroken chain, they will display in that order but think about it. You snaked the LEDS backwards and forwards so the true required order is not how the colours are displayed in the Excel picture. They must be in the same zig zagging pattern, so the forumals I wrote in excel do the same thing. If you look closely you can tell that Row 1 values run left to right --> and row 2 values run right to left <-- Effectively every second row is displayed in reverse! Full code snippet just for the Dig Dug animation: /* Arduino 256 RGB LEDs Matrix Animation Frame * Using WS2812 LED Strips Created by Yvan / https://Brainy-Bits.com This code is in the public domain... You can: copy it, use it, modify it, share it or just plain ignore it! Thx! */ #include <avr/pgmspace.h> // Needed to store stuff in Flash using PROGMEM #include "FastLED.h" // Fastled library to control the LEDs // How many leds are connected? #define NUM_LEDS 256 // Define the Data Pin #define DATA_PIN 3 // Connected to the data pin of the first LED strip // Define the array of leds CRGB leds[NUM_LEDS]; // Create the array of retro arcade characters and store it in Flash memory const long DigDug01[] PROGMEM = { 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000 }; const long DigDug02[] PROGMEM = { 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0x0066cc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xff0000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0xcccccc, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000, 0x000000 }; void setup() { FastLED.addLeds<NEOPIXEL,DATA_PIN>(leds, NUM_LEDS); // Init of the Fastled library FastLED.setBrightness(15); } void loop() { // Put DigDug first frame for(int passtime = 0; passtime < 8; passtime++) { FastLED.clear(); for(int i = 0; i < NUM_LEDS; i++) { leds[i] = pgm_read_dword(&(DigDug01[i])); } FastLED.show(); delay(250); // Put DigDug second frame FastLED.clear(); for(int i = 0; i < NUM_LEDS; i++) { leds[i] = pgm_read_dword(&(DigDug02[i])); } FastLED.show(); delay(250); } } Connect your Arduino to your PC, upload this code, plug it back into your frame and power it on and voila! Note I have not fixed and sealed the back yet so you'll see some odd shapes and light seeping through on the edges but when fixed properly it looks fantastic. Extras: One thing I have done is to source some WiFi integrated 2560's as I want to be able to program them over my WiFi Network instead of USB. I have not started this portion of the project yet. Audio is another optional accessory that I considered but I think whilst very doable may become annoying. You can do this and even add a volume control if you like. WIP Result. I've created around 100 sprites so far ๐Ÿ™‚ Cheers, Brad
  5. Another instance of checking an unfinished project off my list. I still have the pinball to go but this one is easy and that one is hard ๐Ÿ˜‰ This one should be real quick. I bought this ArcadeWorx cab of @namastepat back in February. It's surprisingly large, taking up a lot of space on my garage floor so time to get it working and sitting somewhere else. https://www.aussiearcade.com/showthread.php/92614-Arcadeworx-Bartop-cabinet-with-19-inch-monitor-75?highlight=bartop Cabs is a little banged up with a few nicks but over all pretty good. All black and I love the Space Invaders cut-outs in the marquee area. So I thought I'd continue with the Space Invaders theme and keep the cab Black and Red. It didn't hurt that I had a pack of both red and black buttons ๐Ÿ˜‰ I'd also bought a power supply and jamma harness to match the Pandora 4S I bought back in April. I installed the buttons and joysticks. Will need to check the controls for the Pandora to see if I need the other 3 holes. I'll use what I need and try to find some of those caps to cover any not used. Also the top row holes are smaller than the player button holes ๐Ÿ˜ž The P1 and P2 buttons I used (STD size) will never come out again LOL! Installed speakers inside the audio cut-outs. The IEC socket I have is not round like the hole that had been cut out ๐Ÿ˜ž Traced around and then did a little free-styling with my jigsaw. The flange on the socket hides the shoddiness ๐Ÿ˜„ Wired mains socket, power supply and jamma harness power. I then fired it up to see if smoke would come out. Success! Damn I love how fast these Pandora's boot up unlike those shitty 60-1 jobs. It was getting late so I'll finish wiring in the joysticks and buttons next weekend. One last thing was to mount the fan cover into the top. The Alien one I had suits the theme. With the top cut-out I've love to put in some acrylic and then an LED strip that swipes from left to right. Not sure how I'd do that but lit up red and sliding across would be awesome. I also need to source some black t-molding as the control panel strip is missing. I am bummed its a widescreen monitor but the bezel was cut to match and the screen came with it so I can't complain. Cheers, Brad
  6. I've had this machine sitting neglected in my garage for almost 2 years. Had the parts just not the inclination but over christmas the bug got hold of me and I started working on it. The cab is an old LAI Rampage cab: http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=9261 There was no board, jamma harness, control panel, coin mech's or artwork included. What was included was the original 19" arcade monitor, power supply, fluro light and dodgy mame marquee. I started by creating a new control panel. The original was a 3 player setup but I've built this with 2 players in mind and a centre spinner. As my art skills are non-existant, in the short term I built the panel out of ply and stained and varnished it. Sure not original or normal but it came up okay with the result below: As you can see the player 2 joystick is a top fire as I wanted to be able to play Tron, Battlezone and Two Tigers easily. I'm sure there are other games with possibly doubling the top fire button as a push pull option for games like Discs Of Tron and Frontline. The Top Fire is a normal 8way stick with a modified shaft and top button. I have to say that the joystick itself is a little sloppy on movements and the shaft feels is too short due to the flange at the top. For normal games it's not so bad but I think I need to adjust it and put stronger springs in it. The left joystick is a baton type which I've never used before. I'm a huge fan of MCA's but I had no black ones left so used this out of a mame pack I'd bought ages ago. I'm actually quite surprised at how good it is and would definitely use them again if I had too. The panel has 6 player buttons each, Player 1 start, Player 2 start and Select & Escape buttons. The Select and Escape buttons are temporary until I grab some clear ones so I can print labels for them. Coin Inserts are supplied for P1 & P2 by using a custom made label and 12 volt LED rectangular buttons I had laying around. The spinner is a Turbotwist 2 that I got for christmas 2 years ago ๐Ÿ˜• It is a fantastic piece of kit. USB interface, engineered to fit into a standard 28mm arcade button hole and has a range of options for knobs and wheels. I stuck with a reasonable std blue anodised knob with room for an insert. Many have mounted BYOAC tokens of which I have 100. I'd like to use an Aussie Arcade one ๐Ÿ˜‰ I also added the energy storage cylinder which is effectively a steel piece that fits to the base and lets inertia keep spin going for a LONG time. It works REALLY well. You can check them out here: http://groovygamegear.com/webstore/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=86&products_id=268 The spinner really comes into it's own for the games I've tried it on so far. Tempest and Arkanoid are simply awesome. Cameltry is now an extremely enjoyable game. Star Trek which I only ever play in Sydney's George st arcades in the 80's brings a tear to my eye ๐Ÿ˜‰ Sure it's not in the original environmental cab but I can now play it properly. Other games I've played so far are Blasteroids, Cosmic Chasm, a few other racers and finally Tron. If the Top Fire joystick was restricted to 4 way (it does come with a restrictor) Tron would play much better. Spinner wise though it's perfect. What I need to do is wire in one of David's digital restrictors.....a project for another day. Bare Spinner Blue Anodised Knob 6" Steering wheel The steering wheel is well made and works great but is limited without pedals. Works really well on 360deg driving games such as Pole Position, Sprint, Super Sprint etc but gear changes etc are an issue. What I've done is use the top fire as a gear stick and the top fire button as the accelerator until I get my Pole Position cab rebuilt. I mainly bought the wheel for unknown future uses and due to the fact that shipping separately at a later date was going to cost a bundle. Here's a shot of the bare bones PC components. Using a old GeForce 4 video card and Soft 15khz. Works great on this dodgy old arcade monitor. You can probably see the mini amp up the back. That's a $9.00 Ebay special and interfaces to an old set of car audio speakers. Currently trying out Maximus Arcade as the FE but having a few issues with it. It works but seems to have a few niggles with extra buttons and long delays on exiting games :unsure I'll see if I can tweak it some more and if not ditch it for good old Mamewah or Mala. Still to be done on this cab, tidy the wiring up, new artwork/marquee and I need to purchase decent bolts for the control panel and joysticks. The ones I have used are rat-shit. Oh and one last thing. Just a note to any boofheads like myself. If your using a laser mouse to setup your Mame Cab, stay away from using red cocktail stools as a platform. It took me about 3 hours to dawn on me why it didn't work.......the damn mouse laser is also red and obviously the red laser was being absorbed by the red stool. I didn't realise the spectrum was so wide :lol Cheers, Brad
  7. I've had this bartop carcass in my garage for about 4 years now. Acquired it from Woka. Like many of us, too many projects and not enough time and/or motivation. As is normal with me I get to a point where I want to complete a project that I've put off for some time so I pick one and work on it until done. The biggest kicker for this is that I bought an arcade pack off Ebay pretty cheaply knowing it would suit this. It included 60-1 pcb, power supply, jamma harness, 12 player buttons, 1&2 player button, 2 joysticks, 2 speakers, speaker grills and 50 PCB mounts. Bare carcass here which didn't come with a back or control panel. So using a 19" 4:3 LCD monitor as the template I measured up to see how I could fit everything in. The 19" just fits vertically so I measure up some timber rails to mount both the control panel and rest the monitor on, then glued and screwed. Measured up a control panel and dicked around with control and button layout. Test fitting here. Made a rear door and fitted with a barrel lock. Also cut out a hole for the IEC power socket. Now most people opt for a Galaga based bartop or some sort of custom job. Me, I'm more partial to Galaxian so I've elected to go that way. Woka also included enough T-Moulding to fit this that matches the original Galaxian cab colour. Overall colours will also match so I'm going gloss white and then I'm going to get original artwork sized and printed. that will include Marquee, Control Panel, Sideart & Kick Plate. Not sure I'll bother with a bezel as it would only be the width of the monitor bezel which is 10mm. Now I suck mightily at graphics but I've managed to use Adobe Illustrator to modify the original Galaxian control panel artwork to suit my bartop. Original I printed off a sample on plain paper to ensure it fit and to my great surprise it fit perfectly, down to the button holes. Everything else will remain original, just re-sized to fit. Work to do next is another coat of undercoat and then start the gloss white paint job. And photos can go **** themselves. Doesn't matter how I rotate, they persist in coming out sideways :realmad: Cheers, Brad
  8. I picked this cab up from a Tip Shop a few weeks ago now. I was hoping it was working but they would not let me test it. I took it home anyway to rescue it. The locks had no keys so I had to drill them out. Once I got it open I sadly discovered that the 19" tube had been broken at the back and was not salvageable. The upside was the discovery of a 1942 PCB. I have no way to test it but still a nice find. I'm not sure I'm keeping this cab as I simply do not have the room so I might re-sell it after I've reconditioned it as much as I can with spare parts. First was stripping it down. I took all the metal parts out such as the hinged monitor door, control panel, bolts, rear handles, hinge and any outward facing bolts. A quick wipe down and vacuum got rid of all the old dust, debris and cobwebs from a long storaged machine. I threw the old monitor, yoke and chassis away as effectively useless for me. Stripped monitor door and control panel. A light sand of all steel components with fine grit sandpaper and then 3 coats of satin black spraypaint to bring the components back to new. I also sprayed all of the bolts so that they blend into the black timber panelling. The monitor plexi was held onto the door with double-sided tape which I had to carefully separate so that I did no damage or scratches. Once separated I then had to remove the tape from both parts. The rainbow colour on the plexi has been sprayed on from the back so I had to ensure that I removed the residue without lifting the paint which was successful. I'll put it back together using new double-sided tape once it's all done. The control panel was fitted with a single player setup. A black MCA joystick, 2 player buttons, Player 1 Start, Player 2 Start buttons and a small single button to the right. I suspect that this had been rigged as a credit insert button as it looks to me it had been sitting in someones home for years and there was no coin mech installed anywhere. The MCA was rat shit, so I've replaced it with a spare (I have about 14 of them). Unfortunately I don't have any black ones so I'm using a single yellow I had that matches the yellow in the panel. All of the buttons I'll reuse as they are all fine including the micro-switches. The credit button however will need to be replaced as the top has snapped off. I'll need to try and source one as I've never seen one of these before and I don't want to drill a bigger hole. You can see the restored top unit below. I spent some time wiring up a new power supply, jamma harness and 60-1 board. I decided to use the 60-1 as this cab was a vertical cab and the bezel and monitor shroud were being re-used. I'm a real weenie when it comes to electricity so was concerned about wiring mains 240 power to the arcade power supply but 2 youtube video instructions later and I re-wired a std power plug into the arcade power supply within 5 mins. Hooked up the jamma harness to 5volt, 12volt and ground points on it and test-fired the arrangement. The power supply, board and monitor all turned on, the board initialised and after the 60 second startup (why so damn long?) I had the iCade menu displaying and running. I tidied up all the wiring and used cable ties to neaten it all up. It always surprised me how much room there is in an arcade cab. Really the monitor takes up most of the room. I've gone with an LCD as it's the easiest for me to mount although I do have several spare 19" crt PC monitors hanging around if I feel the need to change it to a CRT look. I ended up modifying the monitor frame to accommodate the LCD. I also created a new internal bezel to suit using 3 ply and sprayed it black to blend it. Once bolted together the monitor sits nice and flush to the front door. I'm creating an instruction card to suit the unpainted space left in the exterior bezel that will fit flush. Unfortunately my colour printer is almost dead so I need to wait till after eater to print it at work before I can remount the exterior bezel. I'll upate this thread once done. Thanks to @Homepin and @DavidAVD knowledge and part I've also mounted a volume control onto the rear of the cab. This is wired in between the jamma harness speaker output and the speaker inside the cab. I've re-used the single speaker that was already in the cab and mounted the control knob into a std button hole that a previous owner had drilled into the back. It's come up pretty nice and fits really well. The back of the cab also had a large square cut-out that gave access to the old monitor yoke but there was no cover. I bought a grill piece, sprayed it black and mounted it. It looks pretty good. Front View minus exterior Bezel Now with bezel minus instruction card until I can get it printed. Apart from that all I really need to do is do something about the damaged sides. Not sure if its worth it or there is a cheats way but the laminate has a chunk out on the right and some deep scratches on the left. It does give it character. I also replaced the barrel locks. Cheers, Brad
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