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Thread: What is the best soldering iron temperature?

  1. #1

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    What is the best soldering iron temperature?

    I was wondering what the best temperature to set my soldering iron or desoldering tool to ?

    Is it different for circuit board work to soldering coils ect under the playfield?

    Does it differ from make or game (possible different solder used)?

    Thanks

    LAP
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    Depends on a variety of factors.

    Soldering iron / solder /what you're working on etc.

    I don't pay attention to numbers, just set it hot enough to easily melt the solder wire. Hard to explain but you'll develop a feel for when you don't have enough heat or have too much.
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    Yeah use a bit of judgement,PCB obviously lower so you don't cook it

    Depends on the solder grade too

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAP View Post
    I was wondering what the best temperature to set my soldering iron or desoldering tool to ?

    Is it different for circuit board work to soldering coils ect under the playfield?
    Yes.

    It can also differ on the same board depending on the size of the traces and the components involved.

  5. #5

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    310F degrees for normal circuit board work with 60/40 solder.

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    Under 350deg (300 - 325)for board work and for line chord or coils crank it to 450deg


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    I generally solder at 300C - 375C depending on the job.

    Use leaded solder. 60/40 is fine, but 63/37 is nicer to work with.
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    Depends on your iron though.

    E.g. when I started out I had a cheap temp controlled iron. When the dial was at 450c the actual tip temp was only about 250c.
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    I got a goot soldering iron (not station) and has its own temperature cutoff at 325deg. So it wont stuff up board tracks unless you really try to.


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  10. #10

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    Soldering quickly at a higher temp can be better than taking a long time to get the job done at a lower temp.

    Dry joints can also be caused by low temperature and/or lingering far too long on the joint.

    If the solder doesn't flow cleanly almost instantly as you apply heat, the temp is too low, the solder is unleaded or you're using the wrong technique.
    "Everyone's always in favour of saving Hitler's brain. But when you put it in the body of a great white shark, ooohh! Suddenly you've gone too far!"

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