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Thread: Bride of Pinbot (2.0)- Williams - 1991 - Repair & Service Log

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    Bride of Pinbot (2.0)- Williams - 1991 - Repair & Service Log

    Welcome to a new Repair & Service log series. I'm still working away on machines for other people, but it feels good to also be making time to work on a game of my own again. This time I'll be going through a Bride of Pinbot, which has the 2.0 upgrade kit from Dutch Pinball installed. Originally released by Williams in early 1991 and over 8000 machines made, it's a game I've been wanting to own for awhile. The kit from Dutch Pinball was released in late 2014 and updates the machine to a colour display with an entirely new rule set. It also allows you to switch to the original game rule set too - which basically means it's two games in one. It runs the original game under emulation though and as a result there is some sound quality issues on a couple of the original speech sounds. I'm told this is due to the quality of the original speech clips being played out of the updated sound system. All up though both games are a hell of a lot of fun to play. I plan to do my usual clean and rebuild of the game, with additional plans in the future for a playfield swap (game came with a clear coated playfield) and new cabinet decals (to be purchased later). For now I'm keen to tackle it in small doses to keep the game in a playable state as much as possible.



    The first issue to sort out was one of the brides face plates not screwed in. The previous owner had mentioned to me the mouth coil was not popping the ball out 100% of the time and would look at it before the machine was shipped down to me. He must not have screwed the face plate back on as it arrived like this.



    Thankfully I'm overflowing with spare parts and so finding a suitable screw to attach the plate was easy enough to fix it. The next issue was not so straight forward.

    After a couple of games, I noticed some issues with a few of the switches. Most notably was the left outlane, which would trigger a tilt warning. Putting the game into the original BoP ruleset, switch issues became more obvious as the face is used more and I was seeing strange behavior around the eye and mouth switches. Putting the game into test mode, a pattern was seen. All 7 switches on row 5 would activate the switch above it in row 4 (and only the row 4 switch - none of the row 5 switches appeared on the display during testing).



    Interestingly, activating row 4 switches did not activate row 5, so they were not shorting. With the game in switch levels test mode, only 1 switch would activate per switch. I inspected each of the switches on row 5 and found an issue with the right trough switch. Looking at the right trough switch, I noticed that some soldering had been done to it at some point in recent weeks/months/year (not sure how exactly how recent) - and the switch wire (white+green) is connected to the banded side of the diode. I believe this should be connected to the non banded side as per the other switches across the machine. The switch itself looked like a replacement as the activating arm was far longer than the shorter one seen on older machines.



    Thinking that this switch was causing some sort of short, I disconnected the wire from the trough switch and then tried the other switches on row 5, but then none of them would register. They only register (all be it incorrectly) when the trough switch is engaged (as a side note, the trough switch (25) would be activating switch 24 - which is marked in the manual as "Always closed" which would explain why there is no 'missing ball' error preventing a game from starting).

    I moved the wire to the correct switch lug on the right trough switch. This resulted in no switches on row 5 working. I ran through all switches on the machine again and marked them off on the switch matrix to confirm that only the row 5 switches were failing and there were no cases where multiple switches were being reported.

    On the P-ROC board, there are a series of LM339 chips which are in charge of the direct and matrix switches on the game. Looking at the P-ROC schematics I found which chip was responsible for row 5. I replaced this chip and booted the game back up.

    At this point, the switches in row 5 started to register correctly. That is, until I activated the right trough switch again. At this point, the switches on row 5 became intermittent until they stopped registering entirely and was again left with row 5 not working (but all other switches fine).

    I replaced the LM339 chip again and this time also replaced the right trough switch. Booting the game back up and testing the switches again, row 5 now registered correctly and the right trough switch worked correctly. I tested the switches on row 5 on repeat for a few minutes, with a heavy focus on the right trough switch and no more failures or intermittent behaviour was seen.

    So from what I can tell, the right trough switch was the cause - not just the incorrectly wired lug, but the switch itself. I don't quite understand why the switch was causing the LM339 chip grief, but it's removal from the machine was necessary. Thinking maybe the diode was shorted or open, it was removed and tested, but it tested fine. Since fixing, I've played a number of games on both BoP and Bop 2.0 modes and both have run without any of the switch issues that were there.

    Now to look at the next on arrival issue with the game. A number of bulbs on the headbox GI were not working. They are located mostly on the left side of the headbox, although a couple do extend out to the upper and lower corners on the right side.



    At first I thought it was probably just a number of bad bulbs. Some owners aren't fussed about it so never bother to replace them. I found that after replacing a few of the non working bulbs with brand new ones, they still didn't work. Swinging the headbox door open, I had a look at the reverse side of the sockets. I soon saw a pattern indicating something more sinister was up. All but three of the non working globes were running off the same circuit, connected by a brown wire. None of the bulbs on the brown wire were working.



    The couple of non working bulbs running off the green wire were replaced and this got them lighting up again. Since none running off the brown wire were working, there was an issue up stream to look at. My first thought was a fuse. I had a look at the fuse chart inside the headbox to see which fuses were allocated to the headbox GI so I could inspect. But when looking at the fuse block on the PCB, I could see the burnt GI connector (located just below the fuse block) was where the issue lay. Where the brown wire should join the connector, it had burnt away. Someone had attempted to repair it in the past and just simply soldered the wire to the header pin - not very well though as the wire had come loose and was hanging down at the base of the headbox.



    Another connector in the area (sitting just to the left of the fuse block) also caught my eye, and it too is part of the GI circuit. This one too had bad signs of burning across at least two of the connector pins.



    Let's fix these properly. To do this, i'll need to get the board out of the machine. First, photos were taken of all the connectors around the board to ensure everything went back on correctly. It's important here as a couple of them are the same size, keyed the same and also sit next to/above each other so can easily be put back in the opposite spots. When removing the board, one of the burnt connectors began to crumble.



    With the board removed, the plastic on the old connector was cut into several smaller pieces and then pulled off the board. Then the solder on each pin was heated up and the pin gently removed from the PCB. Excess solder was cleared away and I installed the new pin headers on both connectors that had been burnt. I find this approach the easiest method for replacing header pins. Once done, the burnt connectors in the headbox needed to be replaced also. I have a tool that makes replacing the IDC plugs easy and each wire was transferred from the old connector to the new one.



    You should always replace both the header pins on the board and the connector. Both connectors and header pins are now in a much better state and as I switch across to LED's, there will be less draw through the connectors which should prevent it from happening again.



    Now that the connector and header pins had been replaced, I also swapped out a lot of the old bulbs from the headbox GI with spare LED's I had. I plan to play around with the colour combination and type of LED's at a future date. For now though I mainly wanted to ease how much power was being drawn by the headbox GI, so this layout will do for the time being. The replacement header pins and connectors did the trick though to sort the issue out and the LEDs sitting on the brown GI circuit were now working.



    On arrival, there was trouble getting the front right leg installed as the bolts wouldn't screw in. It was found that that leg plate that sits inside the cabinet was missing. The previous owner had not mentioned this and had left the nuts inside the cabinet for transport, having them bounce around on the long journey down. The machine was transported on it's back, but luckily one nut was found laying around in the base of the cabinet just inside the coin door. This allowed for the leg to be attached with 1 bolt. With the game set up, the playfield was lifted and the second nut found at the very rear of the machine and the second leg bolt installed.



    I have several containers of spare parts and was pretty sure I had picked up one as part of my junk parts purchases awhile back. I dug through the containers and found a secondhand leg plate, which I could install to do the job properly.



    The plate was screwed into position on the corner of the cabinet, with the earth braid attached. The leg bolts were then installed again. This is the reason I only throw out spare parts when they are faulty / failing as the most random parts come in handy at times.



    The next issue to sort out was the "Live" account. This one didn't really bother me much, but it was something I was keen to get working as it's a neat feature of 2.0. One of the core components on the 2.0 kit is a small NUC style computer which is installed into the headbox. It runs Windows 7 and has networking capabilities (both physical and WiFi). A keyboard and mouse can be connected up to access it.



    The network features allow you to connect your game online, which communicates with the Dutch Pinball "Live" page where your machine profiles are synced and it can stream the DMD display, allowing people to watch your display online during play. You can set up a profile for each individual player which will track their initials, own top 25 scores, stats and also trophies (achievement like things from Playstation and XBox console games - I love this feature!).

    I hooked up a mouse and keyboard, then connected my BoP 2.0 up to my WiFi network. To test, I brought up Internet Explorer (shudder - I hate IE, but to test that the WiFi was connected, it was necessary). So there I was, browsing google via my BoP 2.0 display, connected to my network. I couldn't help but laugh at the absurdity of surfing the web from my pinball machine. I then went to the Live page account that was provided with the machine, but it could not detect my game being online. There is a setting in the service menu which needs to be enabled for it to communicate, so I confirmed that was enabled. After double checking the network settings and also the service menu settings on the machine, I did some googling for similar issues. Not having any luck, I decided to contact the DP support email to see if they could help. Just over 24 hours later, I had an email reply with the corrected account details and my BoP 2.0 was now online with the profiles synced and DMD streaming enabled. Now my profiles sync and when ever my game is switched on, the DMD is streamed for people to watch.




    After playing a few games, I decided to update the game software. The machine was currently running 1.16, but could be updated to 1.19. Looking at the version change log, I saw a number of features and fixes that had been added to the game, so decided to do it. The software was downloaded to a USB stick and then inserted to the NUC in the headbox. From the service menu, you can install the software or revert to a previous version. This is handy as it allows you to easily revert if you find the current version is causing problems. The software was updated to bring the game up to the latest version.



    Another issue that was present on arrival was the ball serve. It would often take 3 or more attempts to kick the ball out into the shooter lane. A quick visual inspection of the assembly showed it to be quite filthy, so I suspect a service will sort this out. It could simply need a clean or there could be a worn part in need of replacement. I'll find out when I get the parts out. Rather than just rebuild the single assembly though, I may as well remove the apron and service the whole area. It's always my starting point for a rebuild, so let's dive in.



    The apron was removed to find the area in a reasonable state. A thin layer of dust sits along the surface and the trough needs a clean. But no nasty surprises and will clean up fine.



    The ball guides and out hole assembly were removed for cleaning. There was the usual collection of crap in the ball trough, but this will clean out fine.



    The last of the ball trough pieces were removed. The playfield area was cleaned and then polished with Novus.



    The metal parts from the apron area were cleaned up. Any small pieces went through the tumbler, while the larger pieces were cleaned by hand. The switch arms from the trough plate were removed for cleaning too.



    There are two assemblies that make up the apron. The first is the outhole kicker, which sends a drained ball into the trough. The second is the ball serve, which kicks a ball out into the shooter lane. Both assemblies were dismantled and cleaned. New coil sleeves were sourced and the shooter lane guard was also removed and cleaned too.



    The mounting bracket for the eject arm had been worked on before, with visible weld signs. The pin was also quite loose, so this will be replaced. It could well be the cause of the constant failed ball serve attempts.



    The assemblies were the put back together and installed back on to the playfield. The metal rails and apron clips were then installed too, leaving the area looking visibly better than before. The kicker and ball serve assemblies also had much nicer movement after cleaning.



    To complete the work on the apron, new instruction cards were printed up onto glossy photo paper and then laminated. Both the apron and shooter housing were cleaned, along with the metal bar that attaches to the apron. The ball serve assembly was tested across a few games and it was much better now, no longer needing multiple attempts to kick a ball out into the shooter lane. Another issue that can be marked off as fixed.



    Now that I had the apron area cleaned up and the ball serve assembly serviced, I wanted to add a little something to my machine. One of the first upgrades/mods I wanted to make to my BoP was back lit flipper buttons. I've done this on some of my other games (X-Files, LAH and Pinbot) and it's pretty easy to do. You can buy premade kits, but I do the kits up myself as they are quite easy and cheap to make. I connect them together with IDC plugs so they can easily be removed from the machine and also if I need to remove the coin door (which I will when freshening it up in a later update), I can just disconnect the mod in seconds. All up it costs about $12 in parts. The tired old red buttons were removed, ready for the kit to be installed.



    The power for the button LED's comes from one of the sockets on the coin door. I have swapped the three globes on the coin door pricing plates to orange LED's too. I plan to spend more time cleaning up the coin door at a later date. The wires run along with the coin door wiring to just inside the coin door, connected to via IDC to a Z header pin for easy disconnect.



    Inside the cabinet, the sockets and LED's are installed beside the flipper buttons. I find using the bendy style LED's offers a bit more flexibility in terms of angling and position around the flipper switches.



    Outside, the buttons glow nicely and give off a really cool effect. I plan to add more purple across the game in terms of lighting, so purple lit flipper buttons should fit in nicely.



    While I was in the zone of creating LED sockets, I decided to add two new ones under the apron. One to shine a LED from the outhole and the other to shine into the shooter lane. For now, I've used 4+1 LED's in cool white, but may switch to another colour (or a combination) once I start settling on what colours I want to use where on the playfield. The LEDs draw their power from the right return lane globe under the playfield.



    It adds some extra lighting around the outhole and shooter lane. I'll get a better idea of how it looks once I start switching the lower playfield area across to LED's. I'm not a fan of mixing LED's and bulbs - I prefer it to be all of one style. For now though, I can live with the mix as I continue to work through the machine.



    The shot which leads up to the pop bumpers should have a one way gate across the entrance. The gate takes up about a third of the opening, which helps prevent certain drains when the ball comes down on the left side of that path. This gate was missing on my machine.



    Turns out that buying the gate isn't so easy. After looking at several parts suppliers locally and overseas, I came up empty handed. However I was able to purchase the wire for the gate locally. After a quick dig through my parts box, I came up with a secondhand gate frame, which would fit perfectly. The frame needs a bit of a clean, but for now I'll put it on the game so I kill off those nasty ball drains. When I'm going through cleaning this area of the playfield, I'll run it through the tumbler.



    Next on my hit list is the translite trim. The right side is badly broken and flaps around. The top piece is not as bad, but split in a similar fashion. These will be replaced.



    The reverse side of the translite is in pretty good condition. The gaps are an intentional part of its design. There are some dirty marks across it though and these will be cleaned up.



    The glass was also cleaned up both sides and then the translite installed again with the new trim set, ready to go back into the machine.



    Now that the translite was cleaned and the trim replaced, I wanted to address one small item to close out this update. The lock for the translite had been removed at some point in the past and left out of the machine. The lock, plate and key arrived with the machine, but in a bag. I wanted to install this once again. The screws were missing however, so a new set were ordered.



    I cleaned the lock plate and then sprayed with satin black to freshen it up.



    The lock and translite were then installed back into the machine. That's it for the first update on the repair & service of my BoP 2.0. I was disappointed about some of the issues the game arrived with, like the burnt GI connectors and especially the switch matrix issue that the seller never mentioned even when directly asked about any existing switch/coil issues before purchase. Next up I'll be doing more work in the lower playfield area by rebuilding the flippers and servicing the sling shots. I will swap the insert bulbs across to LED's too. Still a lot of work to be done to get the machine to a level I'm happy with. Bigger tasks for next year will be the playfield swap and cabinet redecal, but all in good time.
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

  2. #2

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    Nice work, thanks for taking the time to document it.

    You can add this to the list with X-Files mate!

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    Nice work.

    You're making me think I should write more stuff down.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Aussie Arcade mobile app
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    Always enjoy reading your repair logs. Keep up the good work

    I had fun restoring my BoP 1.0, gets played most days

    If youíre not installing new ramps, these are a must for this particular game, if you didnít already know.

    http://www.passionforpinball.com/bop_ramps.htm

    Cliffy.jpg

  5. #5

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    Great documentation of repairs you are an asset to AA, previous owner sound like a shonk, or maybe not as knowledgeable about tech issues as you


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  6. #6

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    Over the last two weeks I've been waiting on the arrival of a parts order from Marcospec so I can continue on with my work on Funhouse. The upside to the wait is it allows me to get more done on my BoP 2.0 until that arrives. This update will be focusing mainly on the lower playfield area, with a few extra things thrown in. So assemblies like the flippers and sling shots will be rebuilt. The playfield area will also be cleaned up and any metal parts like the ball guides and mini posts will head to the tumbler. I have coloured Titan rubbers to install and also LED's from Pinball Life. Let's get started.



    The first step was to start getting the plastics and return lane ball guides off the playfield. The game is well overdue for a clean and there are plenty of ball swirl and trail marks. Thankfully the plastics are not broken, but I'm considering purchasing a CPR set soon. The screws that attach the return lane parts to the playfield connect to T-nuts which are installed under the playfield. Three of the T-nuts were missing and the screws attached by a lock nut instead. I'll be fixing this properly as I have some spare T-nuts from my work awhile back on Pinbot that I can use when I'm ready to get the parts back on to the playfield.



    With all the playfield parts removed for cleaning, next up was to get the sling shot assemblies off the playfield. The assemblies were quite dirty and overdue for a service.



    The sling shot assemblies were disassembled and each component cleaned up. New coil sleeves were purchased to replace the old filthy ones.



    One of the sling shot plunger links had a nice crack across the top of it. This will be replaced with another one.



    Next step was to remove the flipper assemblies for a service. The flippers weren't too weak, but I'm keen to rebuild them anyway so they are 100% and won't have to touch them for along time to come.



    The flipper assemblies were disassembled for cleaning. A flipper rebuild kit was purchased to replace many of the old parts. New bushings and rubber grommets were also purchased, along with transparent purple flipper bats (with the Williams logo) and purple Titan flipper rubbers. Both assemblies were now ready to be rebuilt and installed.



    Since the flipper and sling shot assemblies were off the playfield, now was a good time to clean the lower playfield area. I removed as much of the swirl and trail marks removed as possible. After cleaning the surface, it was then polished with Novus. The switch contacts on the sling shot blade switches were cleaned. These will need some adjusting as they were not sensitive enough before - but i'll do that once the posts and rubbers are installed. Two small mylar patches were installed where the ball drops back to the playfield from the wireform and heart beat ramp.



    Since I had already started converting the GI across to LED's, I was keen to switch the inserts to LED's too. I don't think LED's suit all games, but for a title like BoP, LED's will transform it. I really like the flicker free LED's from Pinball Life. I've used them on some of my other pins and decided to use them here also.



    The old star posts had seen better days, some of them not worth saving.



    The slingshot and return lane plastics were cleaned and polished. The metal parts went into the tumbler for a clean and polish also. I've purchased purple star posts and purple Titan rubbers to install, along with frosted cool white and purple LED's for the GI. The old lock nuts will be replaced with new ones and the 6 screws for the return lanes were replaced with new ones too.



    The slingshot and flippers assemblies were installed back onto the playfield, along with the metal rails. Clear lexan washers will be installed under the plastics and new lock nuts on top. The flippers were adjusted into the correct position and then the assembly tightened. The metal switch arms were also cleaned. Lit up - the lower playfield area looks transformed.



    A little further up on the left side of the playfield is a stand up target and power charge plastic which I want to clean. Since I had easy access to it, I decided to do it now.



    The GI bulbs are burnt, although still light up. They will be replaced with LED's. The three lower star posts should have a single rubber on each instead of a singel rubber across them.



    The plastic piece had some warping which I wanted to straighten out.



    The piece was heated up and then sandwiched until cool to remove the warping.



    New purple starposts and rubbers were purchased. New lock nuts and clear lexan washers will be installed. The metal posts were cleaned up and everything was ready to install.



    The stand up target was removed under the playfield and then cleaned and polished. The playfield area was cleaned and polished. The new star posts, rubbers and LED's were then installed. There is a metal ball rail that sits above the target - I will it later for a clean as I need to remove the shuttle ramp to be able to get it off the playfield.



    The wire form that runs from the ball lock to the left in lane was removed and cleaned. The arms on the ball lock switches were cleaned, along with the plastic housing.



    The last thing to look at for this update is the disappear post assembly, which acts as the ball lock on the wireform. The assembly was removed from the playfield for a well overdue clean.



    The disappear post assembly was disassembled and each piece cleaned. A new coil sleeve and insulator square were source to replace the old ones.



    Last step was to get the plastics back on to the playfield. I also swapped the globes on the skill shot to LED's too. It's coming along nicely. I'm considering adding LED strips along the apron to light up the flipper bats more and perhaps one on the shooter lane. I've not used strips before on my other machines, but there are a few dark areas on this game I'd love to light up more.



    That's it for another update. Having put several games in after the work done, the rebuilt flippers feel a lot better and the sling shots way more responsive. The switch to LED's has made a huge visual improvement too. In the next update I will be taking the heart beat ramp off and cleaning through the mid right section of the playfield. I'm still waiting on a parts order to arrive from the US, which will let me rebuild the shooter assembly and then the remaining assemblies on the upper playfield. That will probably arrive in the new few days. I'm absolutely loving both the BoP and BoP 2.0 rule sets. Still a lot of work to do, but it's coming alone nice so far




    Quote Originally Posted by pauly540 View Post
    Always enjoy reading your repair logs. Keep up the good work

    I had fun restoring my BoP 1.0, gets played most days

    If you’re not installing new ramps, these are a must for this particular game, if you didn’t already know.

    http://www.passionforpinball.com/bop_ramps.htm
    Thanks Pauly - I remember following your BoP thread, you did a great job with yours!

    I had planned to search for some sort of ramp protection as I am keen to replace the ramps. Those are exactly what I need!! Thanks for that link!
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

  7. #7

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    With four weeks off over the Christmas break, it is the perfect opportunity to continue with the overhaul of my Bride of Pinbot 2.0. The plan was to try and do the next few phases of the overhaul in smaller chunks, avoiding the downside of having the game off line for long periods. But this update turned out to be much bigger than expected and has been split into two updates. This happened mainly because getting the top layers off the playfield was a pain and having to put them back on only to remove a few days later for the next phase would create a whole heap of extra work. So once I realised I was in up to my elbows, I decided to keep going. Starting off small though, the first assembly on my hit list for this update is the shooter rod.



    The shooter rod assembly was removed from the game to be cleaned and rebuilt. The barrel spring is in need of replacement and there was a lot of stickiness in the movement of the rod. It didn't feel good when launching the ball. This stickiness restricts the movement of the rod, but I had become use to it and could comfortably dial up a Super skill shot in 2.0. After the clean, I'm going to have to adjust my ball launch to dial that skill shot in again, but it will at least be in a much better state and move freely.



    The assembly was stripped down and the metal housing cleaned and polished. The rest of the assembly was replaced. I opted to go with a clear handle, to work in with the clear (purple lit) flipper buttons. I'd love to get a transparent purple shooter rod handle as I think it would look great, but couldn't source one. I know the shape of the handle isn't a match for the original, but I don't mind changing some things where I feel the presentation of the game is improved. I had ordered a purple shooter tip from Titan Pinball, but my order arrived with a red one. I'll install it with a red one for now, but include a purple tip on my next order. Swapping the rubber tip over is a 5 second job in the future anyway, so it's not an issue I'm worried about.



    The shooter assembly was rebuilt and installed back into the game. The position of the assembly was tweaked a few times, to ensure it made sweet contact with the ball for the skill shot. The movement of the rod was so much better now and it felt and sounded nice when launching the ball. A small issue I noticed that had worked its way into the game was the skill shot flasher no longer worked. This flasher sits just below the kicker, that launches the ball back into play after the skill shot is complete. A quick inspection of the socket revealed the issue. One of the wire tabs had snapped off. It sits right next to where the playfield support arm rests, so most likely got caught at some point when the playfield was lifted.



    There was still enough of the tab remaining on the socket, so I was able to resolder the wire onto it to get the flasher working again. A nice simple issue to sort out. Now to move onto something larger - the right side of the playfield. This is a much bigger task as I will look at the skill shot assembly, right loop, heart beat ramp, mini playfield and pop bumpers. That's a lot to get through. One small issue I was aware of on this side was the 50K skill shot lamp. At times, this lamp stops working and then is fine a few minutes later. I know the LED is good - so when I get the lamp board out, i'll take a look and see if there is an issue there or with the connector.



    Getting access to everything on this side isn't so easy though. You have to remove the clear plastic at the top rear, followed by the helmet. Getting the helmet out wasn't so straight forward as there are a couple of large IDC connected to it, which need to be pushed out a gap at the back of the playfield and then moved around a few playfield pieces. With the helmet removed though, I had better access to everything. My plan was to complete the skill shot and heart beat ramp and then put the helmet back on, but decided to hold off and work my way through the entire top playfield section. It means the game will be in pieces for a few weeks, but once done I don't have to have the game offline until the playfield swap & cabinet decal phases (planned for later this year). The upper playfield area is in dire need of a clean.



    With the brides helmet removed, I figured I'd work on it now. An issue I found on arrival was the two flashers did not work. I suspected it was most likely blown bulbs as they aren't the easiest to get at and swap. The helmet has some cracks around where it connects to the playfield. I'd love to replace it, but sourcing a new one isn't so easy. I believe someone (or a company) did a run of them in the last few years, so I will keep my eyes out for one.



    Someone has been here in the past though as there has been some work done on one of the lamp boards. All lamps on the brides helmet are working though, which is good.



    The helmet was dismantled and cleaned. New red flasher domes were purchased, along with new red #906 LED flashers. New LEDs for the CPU controlled lamps were also purchased and i'll be going with purple, blue and green to add some colour around the helmet.



    The brides helmet was rebuilt and set aside with other parts to be installed when ready. Now I will focus on getting everything off the right side of the playfield. The heart beat ramp was removed and set aside. It has some serious cracks I wasn't made aware off and also some small metal posts installed where the ramp plastic should be (but has broken off) to prevent the ball getting behind the ramp. I'm in two minds about replacing the ramp completely as the entry gate has had to be moved previously due to damage and is screwed into one of the playfield plastics to support it (which i'm also considering replacing after finding some other 'fixes' on the left playfield side). The cliffy protectors also won't install on this ramp without additional modifications, which is forcing my decision - lots of hackery on this "tidy" game.



    The plastics were removed and set aside. Everything here needs a good clean.



    The skill shot assembly and lamp board were removed, along with the metal rails, star posts, lamps and spacers.



    As mentioned earlier, a small problem I noticed with the game from arrival was the 50K skill shot lamp. Another problem I wasn't told about. During the skill shot (and attract mode), this lamp would sometimes not light up. It happened quite frequently and was noticeable, especially during the skill shot where the lamps cycle for the super skill shot award. I was confident it wasn't an issue with the globe or LED. Now that I had the lamp board removed, I could inspect the connector pins and socket. Tracing the track from the 50K socket to the connector pins, I found the header pin had a cracked solder joint. Just the sort of problem that can result in intermittent lamp issues.



    I reflowed fresh solder across all header pins, which should resolve this issue. Looking at the other sockets on the skill shot lamp board, I noticed two more cracked solder joints. No issues had shown (yet) with these two lamps, but better to fix those joints now.



    Again, the joints were heated and fresh solder applied. The lamp board was set aside with other parts, ready to be installed back onto the playfield when the time was right. With all the parts off the right side of the playfield, it was time for cleaning. Any small metal parts that could go through the tumbler did so. Larger metal parts were cleaned by hand. Purple rubbers and post sleeves were sourced to go with the purple theme I'm using across the game. The old worn spinner decals were removed and new spinner decals purchased to install.



    The plastics were cleaned up and the red flasher dome replaced with a purple one.



    Now to look at the skill shot assembly. This was dismantled for cleaning. I'd have loved to replace the 5 rubber wheels, but they are no longer in stock anywhere.



    The kicker arm assembly that launches the ball back into play after the skill shot it complete was removed for cleaning.



    Any small metal parts went into the tumbler, while the larger parts were cleaned by hand.



    The skill shot assembly was rebuilt and set aside until I was ready to install it. Now to look at the mini playfield. The post configuration here is wrong and it's incredibly easy to get the ball down the right exit and have it return to the shooter lane.



    The mini playfield was removed and set aside so I could access the pop bumpers. Lots of filth here, ready to be cleaned away.



    The pop bumper assemblies were removed from the playfield to be rebuilt. One of the metal yokes had snapped in half, so i'm glad to be working on this now before the issue became larger. These assemblies are filthy.



    The playfield area had a lot of built up crap from years of use. There is the original mylar patch over the playfield section, so playfield wear has been kept to a minimum.



    There were a few marks around the base of two pop bumpers I couldn't remove, the rest cleaned up OK though.



    The pop bumper assemblies were cleaned up. I'm going with purple skirts and LEDs. I want to use clear pop bumper caps (instead of red) to give the area a brighter, cleaner feel. Purple star posts and titan rubber will be used on the sling shot assembly that makes up the pop bumpers. All metal parts were cleaned up and new bodies, sleeves, lamp sockets and yokes were purchased for the rebuild.



    Other small metal pieces in the area went through the tumbler. The values plastic was removed and cleaned. New purple star posts and rubbers were purchased. LED's were purchased for the values sign.



    The ball guides, posts, sleeves and star posts were installed around the right loop. The two red targets were cleaned up and new foam padding installed. The old bulbs were replaced with frosted LED's, leaving the right side looking so much better.



    I wanted to add a bit more light around the pop bumper area, so purchased a few LED strips in various colours. It's much cheaper to make your own and really easy to do. The wires then run to one of the GI sockets under the playfield.



    The pop bumper assemblies were installed onto the playfield, along with the star posts and rubbers. New lock nuts and clear washers were also added. I added a white strip to the back panel behind the pop bumpers and also a purple strip behind the sling shot. The white turned out a bit too bright. I used 9 LEDs on the strip, so I think i'll cut this back to 6 or 3.



    Plastics were installed back on to the right side of the playfield, with new washers and lock nuts to secure them.



    Now onto the mini playfield that had been set aside earlier. Many of the mini red star posts were missing and a couple were broken.



    I purchased a new mini playfield to install as the old one was average. The new mini playfield was rebuilt with new red mini star posts and red titan rubbers. The layout was corrected, which will make getting the ball down the right exit (which returns it to the shooter lane) more of a challenge. An interesting thing to note was one star post hole was missing on the reproduction mini playfield (the one at the very lower right). The position was lined up with the original mini playfield and a hole marked and drilled.



    The mini playfield was installed back into the game. I'm still of the opinion 9 LEDs is too bright on the strip at the back, so i'll trim that back and may change its position slightly. When the brides helmet is installed again it will dampen some of the brightness too. To test, i'll put some black tape over the LEDs and see how the change in brightness appears before trimming. I'm thinking though that 3 will be enough. Otherwise though, I'm happy with how much clearer and cleaner this area is.



    That's it for another update. Having the game in parts (and an unplayable state) for the next few weeks wasn't the initial plan when I started on this update. But it's a pain to get the brides helmet on and off, so I may as well do it all now. Next up I'll be working my way through the left side of the upper playfield and also the assemblies inside the brides head (eyes & mouth). I've ordered a set of Cliffy protectors for the ramp entrances, along with a new heartbeat ramp as the existing one had some hacks I wasn't aware of and I'd like to get rid of them. Plus I dont want to create my own hacks to get the cliffys on the ramp. The shuttle ramp has some damage too, but the cliffys can be installed successfully and will cover it, so may not bother swapping it over (at least for now). Still more to come though, so stay tuned
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

  8. #8

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    Just before I was finishing up the previous Bride of Pinbot post, an important parcel arrived from the USA. It contained the BoP ramp entry protector set from Cliffy! Due to the issues with the heart beat ramp, I was in some ways forced to replace the ramp (or leave the various hacks that had been put in place for it). I had no intention of putting the new ramp in until the protectors arrived - so I was glad to see these.



    Now, on with the left side of the upper playfield. The shuttle ramp is also smashed around the entrance on both sides, although at least the gate is still attached correctly. The Cliffy protectors will install properly over the damage, so I'm less worried about replacing this ramp right now. I do plan to in the future, simply because of all the work gone into the game to bring it up to a tidy state. If I don't install it until the playfield swap, I'm not too worried.



    The ramp removed easily enough and was set aside. Underneath there is a small amount of wear at the saucer exit, which isn't really surprising considering how fast the ball shoots out of there.



    This is the sort of hack fix I hate. The plastic that the flasher dome connects to has broken in half sometime in the past. It's an easy piece to break as it's not that strong and a careless knock could easily snap the thin section around the flasher. It's been glued back together with a cut out piece attached below - which is fine as I've done that myself and does give strength to support the broken section. The problem here though is the glue has stuck it firm to the metal post. It was impossible to get the plastic and flasher socket off the post without the plastic breaking again. A new hole had been cut through the plastic with a support post added - which really could have just used the existing hole in the plastic where the flasher dome attaches.



    I continued on and removed everything off the left side of the upper playfield. There is a heavy amount of ball trails around the loop and the usual filth in the areas you can't get to clean.



    With a little effort, the playfield was cleaned. There was a small amount of playfield wear in the area under the ball trails as this section isn't covered by mylar. It's not terrible though and I think the playfield would make a great candidate for repair and clear coat in the future.



    Meanwhile, the large metal pieces were all cleaned up by hand and the smaller ones sent through the tumbler. A purple flasher dome will replace the red one, along with purple sleeves, rubbers and star posts.



    The next assembly to deal with is the scoop kicker. I was surprised how large this thing was to be honest.



    The entire assembly was removed and cleaned. A new coil sleeve and rubber grommet were purchased.



    Now to look at the brides head. There are 3 small assemblies inside the face - left eye, right eye and mouth. Originally there were globes here, but I had replaced them with LEDs a few weeks back. The switch arms and kickers need a really good clean. I also plan to swap the roller switch that sits at the top of the brides head assembly. This allows the game to track which face is currently selected. The main reason for wanting to swap this over is the switch gets a lot of use and I had noticed during 2.0 play, the head would sometime rotate when it shouldn't. It's not common, but has been seen a few times - enough for me to look in to it.



    To get the assemblies out, it's not as simple as it should be. You have to remove the face panel from under the playfield too so you can undo the assemblies from the top and then feed them down below the playfield where you can remove them. You're best to remove the face plate below the playfield first as the assemblies, although small, have weight and when the drop through could easily smash the brides face plate.



    The three assemblies were removed from the head and each was cleaned up. A new coil sleeve and rubber grommet was purchased for each. The kicker heads are a lot cleaner now and ready to install back into the game. I also swapped over the roller switch in the brides head now, which I hope will fix that random rotation during play.



    I had been considering getting a replacement plastic set for the game, but then was more inclined to just replace a handful of pieces since it would/should work out cheaper. I was looking at replacing the sling shots, flipper return, triangle piece (sits below rail - this one had screw holes added as a hack to help fix the heart beat ramp) and the broken again left loop plastic. As it worked out, with postage added to the pieces I could get overseas, there was less of a difference between a complete brand new set locally than I had thought. So a new set it is.



    It wasn't until I lined up the new plastic against the old that the difference really stood out. It's an added cost to the overhaul, but there is a noticeable difference making it worthwhile in my eyes.



    As part of the CPR plastic set, you get a small 3D desk display, which is pretty cool - although could be dropped in order to lower the cost of the set in all honesty. It comes in several pieces which you assemble.



    I'm considering having this as a topper on the completed game. Maybe adding a small amount of lighting - not sure yet. But it's too good to waste on my desk and I love seeing toppers on games.



    The metal rails, posts and lamps were all installed back on to the left side of the playfield. New washers and lock nuts were installed on the plastics. I also went back through other areas of the game and swapped in the new CPR plastic pieces. I also added a red LED at the entrance of the scoop and a white LED strip at the back. Just like on the right side, I think this one is too long also and I'll be cutting it back to probably 3 LEDs on the strip and moving it lower. It's all a bit of experimenting to work out what works well and what doesn't. The key thing for me is to light up the rear of the playfield more. The strips are also reusable, so when I cut off a section, I can then solder wires to it and use it in another spot or machine.



    Time to work on the shuttle ramp. It's quite filthy, but nothing I can't clean up.



    One thing I noticed was a lamp socket at the top of the ramp was busted, with a section of the plastic broken off and the metal prongs exposed. I will be replacing this.



    The ramp was completely disassembled. All small metal pieces went through the tumbler. The large metal piece sits under the ramp entrance and it looks like some sort of after market or home made bit to help support the damage at the ramp entrance. This sort of fix is something I like as it's completely removable and installs without any permanent changes required. Although I'm installing the cliffys, I'll be keeping this installed.



    The ramp was put back together, ready to go back into the machine. I also cut up 2 small 3 LED purple strips, which I plan to install on the left and right of the lower exit on the this ramp. I want to create might lighting around the brides face and I think this will work well.



    The two white LED strips at the read of the playfield were cut back to 3 LEDs and repositioned, which I think allows them to give off enough light, but not too much. I also added to small 3 LED strips to the apron, giving off a nice purple glow at the drain hole.



    Before I went any further, now was a good time to look at an intermittent issue I had noticed for weeks. It was to do with one insert on the left loop. It would sometimes work, and other times not. Seeing the issue with the skill shot lamps (cracked solder joints), I suspected it would be a similar issue here. I had put off looking at it until it next occurred - which was now.



    With the playfield lifted up, I gently pressed on the connector and found the LED lit up. Removing my finger, the LED switched off. I disconnected the IDC, removed the lamp board and flowed fresh solder across the header pins. The problem went away and has not come back.



    Next up, the heart beat ramp. This thing is filthy and falling apart in multiple places.



    The entrance has been smashed with various repairs done. The gate is screwed on from the left into one of the playfield plastics and the right side is broken and reattached. Someone had also installed two mini posts on the playfield to guard where the ramp was broken.



    The ramp was disassembled and the small metal pieces sent to the tumbler. Other parts were cleaned up, ready to go on the new ramp.



    One of the last things to do was the skill shot plastic. I had originally not planned on replacing this, but because there was this lovely crystal clear heart beat ramp now installed, having a weathered skill shot plastic above it would look wrong. It's pretty cheap to replace, so went for it. I'm glad I did as the difference is noticeable.



    Before I install the helmet, I wanted to clean the face panels. They were removed in pairs for cleaning, with the ball guides removed and cleaned too. The metal pieces were put through the tumbler. For some reason I only took a photo of these panels and not the other two. Both received the same treatment. You can buy repro panels with new clear ball guides - but I've got no plans to do it at this point as there isn't any damage on these.



    The face panels were installed back onto the head assembly. The helmet was also installed along with the final clear plastic pieces to complete work on servicing the playfield. Looking back at a day one photo for comparison, you can see how far the game has come.












    It's good to have the game back in a playable state again. I've missed playing both BoP 2.0 and original BoP over the last few weeks. The game is playing really nicely right now. I'm not done yet though. I still want to do some clean up and improvement to the coin door and also clean the knocker assembly. Later in the year, I'll be doing a playfield swap and I also have plans for new decals on the cabinet. I'll probably do the coin door at some point over the next few weeks just to get it out of the way, but the larger tasks will wait.
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

  9. #9

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    Wow!

    That looks amazing mate, thanks as usual for posting such great restore threads.

  10. #10

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    Really good detailed posts and pics mate. Top job. I love the purple theme and coloured lighting, looks really nice. Will be one of the best BoP around.

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