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Thread: SEGA - X-Files - 1997 - Repair & Service Log

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    SEGA - X-Files - 1997 - Repair & Service Log

    Recently, a new machine entered my line up - X-Files. Release by SEGA in 1997 with 1500 (unconfirmed) made, it's the most modern machine to enter my pinball fleet. As you know by now, I'm not one to just get a machine in and play it. There's always work to be done cleaning, fixing and tuning my machines. I'm addicted to that side of Pinball. This one is no different and I'll be working my way through the machine in typical fashion for a full service.



    On arrival, there was an issue to fix before I switched the machine on. One of the pop bumpers was broken. The metal ring was sitting against the skirt and not upright like it should be.



    I pulled the glass off and could move the ring up and down freely with my fingers. It would not remain upright. With the playfield lifted up, I could easily see the issue. Both the fiber and metal yokes on the pop bumper assembly were broken in two and the spring had fallen out.



    Luckily, I had some spare yokes on hand that could be used. The pop bumper assembly was removed from the playfield and the broken yokes replaced. I grabbed a fresh coil sleeve for it too. I will be returning the pop bumpers at a later date for a proper service, but for now I just want it in a working state. The yokes I installed for now are second hand ones from other machines - and I had kept them for times like this. When I rebuild pop bumpers I replace the yokes with new ones. They get such a solid work out each game, they are worth replacing outright. So i'll be ordering a few when the time comes.



    With the pop bumper fixed, I wanted to find out what other functional issues existed before playing a game. After running the diagnostic mode for coils and switches, some additional problems could be seen. The first of which was the magnet, which did not work. Below the playfield is a single coil driven magnet. This lives just before the filing cabinet. Firing the magnet coil in test mode showed it to not be working as it had no effect on a ball rolling around the area. Under the playfield, I could see the fuse was not in a good way.



    The fuse was replaced and the magnet tested again. Still nothing. Off to the manual. Turns out there is a second fuse which lives on the power board in the headbox. A visual inspection of the fuse told me it too was dead. But to be sure, I switched the machine off and removed it for testing. It was confirmed dead and so replaced with a new one. I switched the machine back on again and fired the magnet coil - this time it was successful.

    While running the coil tests, 4 of the flasher lamps failed. The first lives under the trap door. Someone had decided to install a #555 bulb instead of the required #906. This was replaced. One of the other #89's that was failing could easily be reached and was replaced also. In coil test mode again, those two now worked. So I suspect the other 2 failing flashers are just dead #89's needing to be swapped. They are not easy to get to, so will do them when I perform a proper clean of the playfield.

    Happy with that I was seeing in the coal test mode, I jumped across to the switch test mode. I ran through the matrix of switches and found they registered correctly except for one - the opto switch that controls the magnet. This switch was constantly flagged as being on. I first attempted to adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver, without any success. Even perfectly aligned, the switch was still considered activated. There are two opto switches in this area and a visual comparison showed the faulty one was not as bright as the working one (the photo is deceptive as it looks like the LED is not on at all, while it actually is - it's just not captured well).



    Under the playfield, the receiver board has a LED at the base, which turns on when the switch is activated. This LED remains on at all times, hence what I was seeing in the switch test. You can buy replacement transmitter boards, but it seemed like overkill in this instance. A new LED was purchased and installed instead. Visually the difference was obvious.



    Back in switch test mode, the switch was now working correctly, solving another issue.

    The switch tests now all passed, along with the coils (minus a few flashers, which I suspect are just bulbs needing to be replaced). With the very obvious issues out of the way and game diagnostics looking OK it was time to actually play the game. This should hopefully show up any game play issues currently lurking there. Indeed, a few issues did show up which I would like to address before cleaning the machine.

    After a few games I noticed that the left orbit switch would get stuck once the ball rolled over it. Eventually, it would come free and return to its normal resting position. But something was preventing it from moving up and down freely. With the playfield up, I could see the switch wire stuck. It was being held there by the edge of the hole in the playfield.



    The switch arm looked fine and not bent. The two screws attaching the switch assembly to the playfield were loosened up and the switch shifted down slightly. This now allowed the switch arm to move freely when the ball rolled over it and return to it's resting position. No more stuck switch when hitting the orbit - it was good to go again.

    While looking at this switch, I noticed that one of the wires leading to the microswitch had previously been cut and twisted back together again and the bare wire left exposed.



    This was fixed up before moving on.

    The next thing to look at is the VUK (vertical up kicker). There are a few possible ways for the ball to reach this (Shooter lane, Filing cabinet and Trap door). All three lead here at various points of the game and the ball is then kicked up to return it to play. As you can imagine, this assembly gets a real workout. The are a few issues around this, but I suspect they are all related. Looking under the playfield at the assembly, I manually tried to move the plunger. It was incredibly sticky. As you can see, it can't always return to it's normal resting position. The flow on effect from this is weak kicking of the ball and the switch (used by the game to detect there is a ball sitting there) would not actuate.



    The whole assembly was removed from the machine, pulled to pieces and cleaned. There was a lot of crap built up around the coil sleeve and plunger. Looks much better now.



    The VUK assembly was installed back into the machine. The plunger now had unrestricted movement and could freely pass through the coil sleeve. This was a big improvement.

    One other intermittent issue was the ball launcher. It strikes the ball inconsistently. Since it's located under the apron, I may as well clean the apron and ball trough at the same time. On the apron, the decals have retained their colour nicely. You can buy reproductions of these, but it's not required here. Those old crappy apron cards will be replaced with something that looks much better however.



    With the apron off, I could see the area below was relatively clean. I like the use of Sonic and X Files logo printed on to the lower section of the playfield. It's interesting to see SEGA put Sonic on the playfield and also use their Saturn console logo on the flipper bats.



    Although the surface looked clean, there was a small layer of dust covering it. Wiping my finger along the top of the ball trough revealed a cleaner surface below. This will be quite easy to clean and well worth doing since I had the apron off.



    As mentioned, while playing I had noticed something up with the ball launcher. It appeared to be loose and would causes some odd movement / striking of the ball when activated. With the apron off I could now clearly see the shooter assembly and one of the screws that hold the coil retainer in place had come out. The other screw was also loose, although still holding on. The coil sleeve was filthy too.



    Before tightening it all up I wanted to clean the assembly, so the launcher was removed.



    Each part of the launcher assembly was cleaned and set aside to be put back together again.



    The old coil sleeve was long overdue to be replaced, so a new sleeve was installed back into the coil and the assembly rebuilt. No more wobbly coil and plunger. Much better. Now to look at the ball trough. X-Files has a 4 ball multiball mode and in the trough, are 3 microswitches to detect the presence of the balls. The fourth is an opto switch.





    The ball trough cover has been removed, so was cleaned up and set aside ready to go back on.



    The ball trough was removed from under the playfield for cleaning. The wires run to an IDC plug to allow for easy removal. The coil frame was removed for cleaning too. All components were cleaned up and the assembly was ready to go back onto the machine.



    The plastic apron was cleaned up and new apron cards installed. I printed off a custom set from www.pinballcards.com. These nicely compliment the apron and finish it off. I'm not a huge fan of the plastic style aprons Data East and Sega used as I think metal ones look much nicer. But they serve their purpose - and no rust / artwork scratching is a plus. The small plastic over the shooter lane was removed, cleaned and polished. The ball trough was installed back into the machine and the apron over it to complete this area. The erratic ball launcher issue was now resolved and the apron looking much nicer.



    A small mod I've done recently on some of my other machines (Pinbot & LAH) is back lit flipper buttons. For those machines I colour matched the LED to a transparent flipper button. Here though I couldn't find transparent purple buttons, so have had to go with clear buttons. I was tempted to use blue to match the faded side art, but the purple suits the apron decals and cards. I'm going to run with it for awhile - it's easy (and cheap) enough to change to blue if I decide to change. One cool thing about the purple on the right had side button is the LED is located just below a small purple plastic piece sitting over the shooter lane - the button LED gives off enough glow to subtly light this up. With the button LEDs hooked up to the coin door lights, they flash on and off with the GI at certain points of the game, which has a nice effect too.



    When the game boots up, it shows the current display and CPU ROM versions. The machine is running v3.00 for the display and v2.00 for the CPU. A quick check on IPDB showed the most recent ROM for the CPU was out of date, with the latest at v3.03. I reached out to @Skybeaux (Ken) and ordered a new CPU ROM, which was then installed to bring the game up to date.



    That's enough for my first update on the machine. A lot of progress has been made already towards getting the machine into the state I want it. The feature inhibiting issues were resolved, along with a few small intermittent ones. Some assemblies got a good clean and a bit of presentation work was done on the machine too. I plan to look at the other assemblies for a proper service, along with stripping the playfield for a decent clean. Next up I'll be looking at the two sling shot assemblies, along with the trap door and orbit diverter assemblies. I will also look to clean up the under ramp playfield (that leads tot he VUK). The right return lane plastic is broken on my machine, but I managed to find a place that sells them new (with a set of the sling shot plastics). These have been ordered and will arrive soon. More to come soon
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

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    It's time for the second update on my repair and servicing of a SEGA X-Files pinball machine. Less repairs for this installment and mainly servicing what's there. My focus for this update is to work through the remaining under playfield assemblies that need a service. X-Files is a bit thin on coil assemblies compared with other machines I've worked on recently. Outside of the flippers and slingshots, there are only 6 others to service (and three of those are pop bumpers). Once they've all been cleaned up, that will mean I'm ready to strip and clean the playfield. I'll be starting with the slingshots. The assemblies are just like the ones I saw on my Date East Last Action Hero. They get a good work out during play, so have built up a nice layer of black dust around the plunger, link and coil sleeve.



    The slingshot assembly was completely disassembled and each part cleaned. Both sling shots were done at the same time and in similar condition.



    The sling shots were reassembled and installed back into the machine. The contacts on the two switch blades for each slingshot were cleaned and also slightly adjusted for better sensitivity. I will hold off cleaning the plastic and playfield above the sling shots for now. I plan to strip the playfield and properly clean it in the next stage of servicing, so will deal with those then.

    Just up from the sling shots are a banks of stand up targets, with a set on each side. These targets are used in game to advance the end of ball bonus and multi-ball jackpots. They are quite dirty, so let's get them off the playfield and clean them up.



    Under the playfield, the target bank is actually a collection of 3 individual targets. Each target is it's own assembly, held in place by two screws. Each target is connected to the wire trunk via a small IDC connector.



    The IDC connectors were taken off the targets and each one removed from the playfield. Their design is quite simple and they activate a micro switch inside the housing.



    For a comparison, I cleaned one of the targets up with isopropyl alcohol and a cloth, followed by polishing with Novus. It makes a very noticeable difference.



    The second target now clean, shows how a little bit of cleaning can make an impact.



    Once all three targets had been cleaned and polished, they were installed back into the machine. Lit up, they look great - the red on the target plastic much cleaner. I'm looking forward to adding some LED's behind them soon. The targets on the other side of the playfield were handled the exact same way.



    Continuing my journey up the playfield, the next assembly on my hit list is the trap door. This one is made up of three parts (four if you include the plastic ramp).



    The coil assembly, metal trap, and plastic ramp were removed first. I'll return for the actual trap door shortly. The microswitches are joined to the game via IDC, which means they can easily be disconnected and removed for servicing.



    The coil assembly was disassembled and cleaned. A new coil sleeve was sourced to be installed.



    Under the playfield there is a ramp which carries the ball from either the trap door or the filing cabinet to the VUK (vertical up kicker). This thing is filthy.



    Lately I've started relying on Nifty for cleaning as it does a great job. It didn't fail here and really cleaned the plastic up.



    The last part of the trap door assembly was the door flap itself. Due to the shape, this was tricky to remove.



    The flap assembly was dismantled and each part cleaned. With everything from the trap door assembly now serviced, it was time to put it all back together.



    At the very top of the playfield is an assembly that looks very similar to the ball serve & launcher assemblies. This one pushes its post above the playfield and acts as a diverter on the outer orbit shot. It's controlled by the two orbit switches, so only engages for a short time to divert the ball. Some missions in the game disable this though, allowing you to make the full orbit shot, which is always cool to do. This assembly is working fine and just needs a clean and new sleeve.



    The assembly was removed from the playfield for cleaning. Compared with some of the other assemblies on this machine, it's not too bad.



    The assembly was cleaned up and a new coil sleeve sourced. It was installed back into the machine, ready to block my orbit shots.



    That just leaves the pop bumper and flipper assemblies to look at. I'll be servicing the pop bumpers once I have the playfield stripped. The flippers I will be putting off for a bit, simply because they are still reasonably strong and are not yet ready for a rebuild.

    That's all for the second update on my X-files service & repair. More positive progress made, bringing the state of the machine closer to where I want it to be. I have a few small presentation things to do next and I'll then advance to stripping everything from the top of the playfield so I can properly clean it. I'll then clean parts as they get installed back onto the machine, along with installing LEDs and coloured Titan rubbers. At that point, the machine should be in a state I'm happy with - so stay tuned as there is more fun to come
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

  3. #3
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    Love the X-Files show and really looking forward to seeing this finished.

    Underrated game IMO.

    Keep the photos coming, thanks for sharing.

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    After my last two updates, X-Files is already starting to play better and I'm happy with how the machine has progressed so far. While waiting for a couple of parts to arrive, I decided to get a few smaller things done around the machine. The filing cabinet has two globes pointed directly at it, with lamp shades attached to the socket. These act as spot lights during play and light the cabinet up. The one on the left was missing the lamp shade (also called a reflector).



    These can be purchased and since I didn't have any spares, ordered one to install. I regret not ordering a second to replace the existing one on the right as they newer reflector helps produce a much brighter effect.



    The right return lane plastic on my machine broken at some point in the past. I found a place in the US that sells a small package of the slingshot and return lane plastics together.



    While my slingshot plastics are not broken, it certainly won't hurt to replace them given they came in the set. It's a shame about the average artwork printed on them. I don't plan to install the replacements set just yet though and I'll wait to install them once I've stripped and cleaned the playfield. They have a thin protective layer on top, which will be removed during installation. Along with the replacement plastics, I also ordered a clear piece which sits over the top of the filing cabinet entry. This acts as a shield to protect the plastics in the area. I'm not sure if it's an after market piece as I've seen a number of machines with it fitted. It was not present on my machine, so will add this after the playfield clean too.



    I wanted to lift the presentation of the machine a little, so thought I would pretty up the front of the cabinet and the coin door. Sadly, the nice purple colour in the cabinet art has faded over the years from (most of) the machine. Blue still suits X-Files, so I can live with it. I have seen some custom art decals around (or at least discussed), but I don't plan on replacing the original set for now. There are some things that can be done to pretty the front up a little though.



    I decided to start with the ball launch button - the big X button on the right. This is hooked up to a microswitch inside the cabinet. It is also supposed to be lit at times in the game where the player can launch the ball. Right now the button does not flash, so it's most likely a blown bulb. I saw this on my Last Action Hero recently where both the start and smart missile buttons no longer lit up as the bulbs had never been changed. The launch button was removed and disassembled. Everything cleaned and some novus polish applied to give it some shine - especially the clear plastic at the front of the button, which was looking dirty.



    Back on the cabinet, a few remnants of that nice purple that once lived there can be seen. The small holes that appear at the top of bottom of the button line up with small bits on the back of the plastic button to help align the button in position. This also means when reassembling the button components, it's possible to incorrectly align things so you end up with a side ways X... as I found out



    Something I like to do on my machines is replace the foreign currency pricing plates. In this instance, no pricing plates existed. The game is set to free play, so I wanted to add some free play decals. At first I was tempted to print up some X-File logos, but it's already in use on the launch button. I decided to get an X-Files font and print up the words free play. The small metal plate is there to prevent coins from being put into the slots.



    One of the coin entry housings has a nice crack through the plastic. I rummaged through my spare parts and came up with a matching one to replace it. I love finding perfectly suitable second hand parts in my stash to swap in where required.



    I downloaded an X-Files font and printed up some decals. These were installed into the coin reject buttons. The red plastic was cleaned and then polished up with some Novus.



    The housings were then installed back onto the coin door. One last thing I wanted to do here was to have an X-files keychain for the keys. A quick look on ebay turned up quite a few results, but in the end I settled on creating my own with the translite artwork. As a side note, there are some sets of X-Files slingshot plastics available which include a tag for a keyring - but I decided against buying another set of new sling shot plastics just for the tag.



    Having had the playfield up a few times recently, I've noticed that the underside of the large X insert is filthy. Before moving on to the top side of the playfield, I'll give this a decent clean.



    There are 9 bulbs attached to a clear plastic backing, which are used to light up the X as you progress towards "TRUTH" multiball mode. The lamps were disconnected and the backing plate removed. It has collected a lot of black dust, which is heavier towards the areas next to the two sling shots.



    Some Nifti and a cloth made easy work of cleaning it though.



    Back on the playfield, the black dust had also attached itself to the underside of the insert. This affects how much of the green light shows through the insert during play. As with the clear backing, the black dust is centralised around the section closest to the slingshots.



    After a wipe down, it's looking so much better.



    The green caps on the bulbs were cleaned also. I plan to replace them with LEDs soon. The clear plastic was installed back under the playfield and the lamps put back into place. A little bit of cleaning has made a huge difference.



    A similar issue can be seen with two inserts for the agent badges. These also had a nice layer of black dust on the underside of the inserts.



    With the dust cleaned off, the insert looks nicer and lights up cleaner during play. This was repeated for the Agent Scully insert on the other side of the playfield. When I get around to installing LEDs on the inserts, I will be giving each one a wipe down too.



    One last small thing to clean are the two FBI badges at the rear of the playfield. I've seen a small mod done to light these up from behind by cutting out sections of the rear panel. I won't be going to that trouble.



    The two agent plastics were removed, cleaned and polished.



    That's it for this update. Hopefully my parts orders will arrive in the next few days. I'm waiting on a bunch of LEDs for the playfield GI and also some Titan rubbers. I'll be using a mix of red, blue and green across the playfield, along with a few purple post sleeves. Once they arrive, I'll strip the playfield and clean. The pop bumpers will be rebuilt as part of this process and the metal parts put through the tumbler. There is a broken flasher dome that will be replaced too . Lots of good things still to come.
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

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    excellent update and great photos explaining the process of restoration as you go along.

    Thanks for sharing

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    Hey @Jesder, which transmitter optos did you use and where can I get some? I have a Maverick with similar problems. Cheers.
    Last edited by Limorange; 31st July 2016 at 12:33 AM.

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    .....another great read wouldn't expect anything less

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limorange View Post
    Hey @Jesder, which transmitter optos did you use and where can I get some? I have a Maverick with similar problems. Cheers.
    It was purchased from Ken (Skybeaux) at the same time I ordered the updated CPU rom from him.
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

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    Time for an update on the service and repair on my X-Files pinball machine. After the work done so far, the game has been holding up well. I have really come to appreciate it and going by the audit menu, I've put just over 150 games into it. It's a fun title and I think does not get the credit it deserves. While it's playing well, it can be even better. To get the machine into the state I want it, I need to give the playfield (and all its surface components) a really good clean. I also want to rebuild the pop bumpers and add LED's for the GI. That means it's time to take the machine offline for the next week (maybe two) and give the playfield and it's parts a solid clean.

    First to come off the machine were the ramps. This then allowed me access to the plastics below. With the plastics off I could then access all the various posts and ball guides. There are quite a few to remove. The plastics all need a good clean and these will get the novus treatment before being installed again. Often, dust and crap attaches to the underside of the plastic too, which can affect how well they look lit up. So both sides of each piece will require a clean. I also removed the sling shot parts and return lanes.



    I continued to remove parts from the playfield, taking more photos along the way until finally it was clear enough for cleaning. The pop bumpers will be first on my hit list and from there I will move onto cleaning the playfield and it's parts.



    The easy to reach places on the playfield were not too dirty. But those covered by ramps or plastics were the opposite and in real need of a clean. To show an example of the cleaning result - here is the outer right orbit shot. Before cleaning, the playfield is filthy and a few lovely "dust bunnies" cling on to the wire guides.



    After a good clean, the playfield in this area is looking nice again.



    There were several cases of this across the playfield. My approach is to first vacuum up all the loose crap floating around the playfield. I then switch to nifti and a soft cloth. I gently wipe away the filth that's build up on the playfield over the years. I then finish off with Novus 1. Before I get too far into cleaning though, let's look at those pop bumpers. I'm not a fan of the flat pop bumper caps - and I don't think they are easy to come by either if you want to replace them. As you can see there is a lot of dust and general filth in the area. Working on the pop bumpers is one of my least favorite assemblies to look at. However, freshly rebuilt pop bumpers are a sweet sound and are worth the effort



    Under the playfield, the pop bumpers are a very standard set up. The lamp wires are soldered onto some near by boards - I really loved how Bally did a connector on some of their machines as it made working on the pop bumpers so much easier. But here I'll have to desolder the wires to get the pop bumper body off the playfield.



    To begin, I decided to work on two pop bumpers first. I do this simply so I always have 1 to reference if need be. The skirts are a bit eaten up at the edges and lots of black dust built up around the base and bodies. The rings are still very serviceable, however I have new ones to install this time. I will run the rings through the tumbler for a future machine though.



    The assemblies for the pop bumpers were then removed from under the playfield for cleaning. As always, there is a lot of black dust built up around the spring and yokes.



    Going onto this machine are new bodies, skirts, rings and yokes. I will also be installing new spoons and sleeves. The pop bumpers get a real work out in any game, so I don't mind putting a little bit of money into them. Plus I'd rather service them once and not have to return for a long time (...ever).



    With the pop bumper rebuild coming along nicely, I decided to clean the playfield at this point. First up, the wireforms were cleaned with steel wool to remove crap that have become attached to them over the years. The vacuum was then used to suck up anything loose across the playfield. I then hit it with nifti and a soft cloth. This made easy work of the dirt. The pop bumpers were the installed back into the machine and some LED's installed in the area for the GI. I swapped the black rubber for red titan rubbers and also went with red skirts (instead of white). The pop bumpers are looking good and I can't wait to try them out in game once the playfield is back together.



    Something many of us can probably relate to when working on a machine - our other machines become storage / benches for parts. So not only have I got 1 machine offline to work on, but the other three also not able to be used until parts go back onto the playfield. I better keep moving forward then and get X-Files back together again. Or maybe buy more machines? Now that sounds like a solution



    While I had been working away at cleaning the playfield and rebuilding the pop bumpers, all the small metal parts went for a session in the tumbler. This thing works wonders and I can't recommend them enough.



    With the pop bumpers rebuilt and playfield cleaned, it was time to begin the task of installing everything back onto the playfield. This is always a much slower process than stripping it down, as everything needs to be cleaned before going back on. I started with the metal posts and various star / regular posts around the playfield. I decided to swap out some of the black posts with transparent red, blue and clear posts to bling the playfield out a bit with them. I also decided to swap in transparent blue star posts for the clear ones on the sling shots. I am also using Titan rubbers around the playfield (except for the flippers, which use normal rubber). The lower playfield area started coming together first.



    With the effort going in to clean the machine up, I decided to install new flipper bats with new blue flipper rubber. This wasn't really necessary, but fresh white bats looks great on a cleaned up machine (and they don't break the bank to purchase). I find it interesting that SEGA chose to include the logo for it's Saturn console on the flipper bats.



    One thing I wanted to do as part of this clean was replace the two mylar patches at the sling shots. These have worn around some parts of the edges and also allowed crap to collect under them. This is a photo from before the playfield strip.



    The two patches were removed by applying some heat and the remaining sticky was removed with eucalyptus oil. Once the playfield was cleaned, new mylar patches went on, leaving the slings looking much cleaner. The new flipper bats were installed, and the return lanes also went back onto the machine. The replacement return lane and sling shot plastics were installed. The metal washers used on the slingshots were replaced with clear lexan washers.



    At the top of the playfield, various posts were installed and the large metal ball guides for the orbit shots were cleaned and installed once again. LEDs were installed throughout.



    Above the pop bumpers, the red lane posts were installed once again, along with all the posts and new rubbers. This area has really cleaned up nicely. Something interesting on this outer orbit shot is the playfield has an extra switch hole on each side that is unused. I'm not sure why they were included - unless it's a way to increase the difficulty in registering an orbit shot?



    Across the upper area of the playfield, more of the regular posts were installed back onto the playfield. The ones left as black are all hidden under plastics and ramps, so I didn't feel the need to swap in transparent red/blue/clear for them. With a quick clean they were good to go.



    That's it for another update. Right now, I only get about an hour to work on the machine each night. That means progress is a little slow - but it's important to keep momentum and do what I can. That way the machine continues to come back together each day. I'm happy with the pop bumpers being done now and also cleaning up the playfield. Getting a playfield back together is always slower since you're cleaning parts as you go, but the end result is always worth it. In my next update I'll have the playfield fully back together and also hopefully sort out LED's for the inserts. These SEGA machines are known for their ghosting issues with LED's, so i'll be looking to the non ghosting variety or an ocd board. More to come soon
    Eschew the standard. Turn the paradigm upside down.

  10. #10
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    Wimmera, Victoria
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    Hey Andrew, just seen this post & thought that, If you wanted a Purple lit flipper button had you considered a Blue plastic button with a RED led inside it. Blue & Red make Purple, I hope this helps you.

    Gemini2544's 4th Pinball meet Saturday 21/03/2020



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