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Thread: Scanning Artwork

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    Scanning Artwork

    With the chase HQ I picked up from Manta one whole side artwork is gone.

    The right side is there mostly so I was planning to scan that side, do some photoshop touchups, mirroring etc and then get it printed out to apply to the left side.

    So a hand scanner is in order. Anybody have much experience scanning in entire sides of cabinets. Can it be done in one large image, or does it need to be scanned in A4 piece by piece stitched together.

    How does the stitching program work, does it track where the scanner is and can stitch overlapping images or how does it work?

    What about hardware, any decently priced hand scanners up to the task?

    Advice needed please?
    Hindsight is always in high definition!

    C64anabalt: 9647m

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    My weapon, and many others, of choice is the HP4670 scanner. Being see through allows you to see what part you are scanning and saves a bit of time. I like to mark the scan area out with tape first to make sure I have enough real estate with the overlaps.

    For stitching, there are a few programs out there but for quick and easy, use Photoshop and photomerge them back together. You don't have to be too fussy using that. Once you have them stitched back together you'll have to resize it a bit.



    Edit, make sure you scan at at least 300dpi.





    Sent from my HTC Sensation XE with Beats Audio using Tapatalk 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by spacies View Post
    My weapon, and many others, of choice is the HP4670 scanner. Being see through allows you to see what part you are scanning and saves a bit of time. I like to mark the scan area out with tape first to make sure I have enough real estate with the overlaps.

    For stitching, there are a few programs out there but for quick and easy, use Photoshop and photomerge them back together. You don't have to be too fussy using that. Once you have them stitched back together you'll have to resize it a bit.



    Edit, make sure you scan at at least 300dpi.





    Sent from my HTC Sensation XE with Beats Audio using Tapatalk 2
    Thanks but why the resizing? Does the scanner not scan 1:1?
    Hindsight is always in high definition!

    C64anabalt: 9647m

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    Yes it does but stitching a large area back together it shrinks it. I have had playfields drop up to 13mm. It's easy to resize anyway.

    Sent from my HTC Sensation XE with Beats Audio using Tapatalk 2

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    Ok, I guess the little overlaps you get with stitching it together shrinks it slightly.

    Resizing would just be photoshop resize by percentage I imagine? Never had to scan a large artwork before so this will be a learning experience.

    So with that scanner, you would lay the cab down on it's side preferably, and lay the scanner flat on that to scan each section. then spend hours piecing it back together.
    Hindsight is always in high definition!

    C64anabalt: 9647m

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    Yeah it does shrink it a bit here and there. Just something to remember. Once you have a stitched image in Photoshop, hit CTRL + T to resize it, enter the dimensions you want, including 'mm' and press enter. Job done.

    I wouldn't bother trying to stitch them manually mate. It much easier to do it automatically and spend the time redrawing and tidying the image up

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    The HP4670 seems to be fairly old now, probably not sold new anymore. I guess the only place to buy one is on evil or slumtree etc?
    Hindsight is always in high definition!

    C64anabalt: 9647m

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    I have scanned (A4) backglasses in the past and joined images together in Corel Draw which is time consuming and gives a fair quality. If you know someone who has good camera with 18 megapixels plus or more you'll find the images are sharp and allow for clearer editing in CAD software. The photo must be taken straight on and not from an angle as this will distort the scale of the image.
    http://www.oldpinballs.com/

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    Here is some free artwork that may help for one or other project
    http://vectorlib.free.fr

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    Quote Originally Posted by knight76 View Post
    The HP4670 seems to be fairly old now, probably not sold new anymore. I guess the only place to buy one is on evil or slumtree etc?
    Yep, its old. I picked up two for $10. They do a great job.

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