Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 24/09/21 in all areas

  1. things have changed over the last 3 years. will be offering up many one off pinball and arcade signs, signed 60s and 70s flyers, rare 80s promo pinball posters, auction posters plus more. offering up here first, will start up sunday. transitioning into retirement, time for others to enjoy.
    17 points
  2. Honestly, I am a little sad it has turned into this. Dont get me wrong we all want to make money and know we have great investments.... But, for me...bring back the days of affordable games like Shadow, no fear, Congo and Roadshow, and many other B/W of the time so new players are not scared off! You should not have to spend 5k minimum on a piece of shit. There will always be the haves and haves not.... I have always shared my collection to all that would like to play, Honestly, the current situation makes me a little sad....
    14 points
  3. Ice Cold Beer (not the drinkable kind). $3500 NSW Illawarra area. Fully working condition - tested. Imported from the states some time ago, brand new isolating step down transformer included. Power supply fully operational and tested, all voltages and currents are tested correct. New bridge rectifiers installed all to original or better spec. Motors are working great, new belts installed. Previous owner had extra pulleys installed (not necessary). New ball on play field. I’ve done some work on the board to bring it back to life including new amp and cap kit for sound. Some new transistors. New errant ball solenoid and plunger kit. New fluro light and starter. All play field lights are working with one new LED on hole 6. The sound is great although has a bit of a hair trigger between good and loud but no functional problem. The errant ball solenoid can take a few times to kick the ball back onto the play field. Cosmetically the cab is almost 40 years old and has its share of scars but is in good condition considering. The left hand side decal has some scratches and is slightly lifting a small section at the bottom. The right side decal is about the same but someone thought it would be a good idea in the past to screw a few holes towards the top (nothing crazy). The control panel overlay is about the same as the sides and is standard for the game, start button replaced for new. The glass has paint missing in the usual places and the play field is as good as it gets living behind glass it’s whole life. Video in action:
    13 points
  4. There was a proposal put forward a few days ago to the IFPA Australian Country Directors and State Reps for the appointment of the two new IFPA Country Directors for Australia listed below, and all agreed on the proposal. I would like to take this opportunity to announce the appointment of Jason Lambert and Jimmy Nails to the roles of IFPA Country Director (Australia) and look forward to their contribution with their knowledge, experience and passion for pinball and helping drive further growth in competitive pinball in Australia. Most of you would know how much Jimmy and Jason have already achieved over the years in hosting major IFPA events and enticing players not only in Australia but beyond. They have been instrumental in the growth of pinball in Australia. Jason is also ranked one of the top IFPA pinball players in Australia and has also represented Australia in the IFPA World Championships as well. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Luke Marburg for his many years as IFPA Country Director (Australia). Luke has decided to step down from the role. I cannot begin to thank Luke enough for his commitment, passion and absolute wealth of knowledge in helping oversee IFPA events in Australia over the many years. Luke was instrumental in helping grow competitive pinball in Australia, on behalf of the IFPA, and I will certainly miss his assistance. Luke is not only one of the top ranked IFPA pinball players in Australia, having represented Australia in the IFPA World Championships, but also responsible for creating a number of formats that players have enjoyed using in their events. I look forward to what lies ahead as we start to open up Australia again and pinball events start to increase over the next few months. I will be providing more information in the coming days and weeks on what changes are coming, so stay tuned. Regards Dan
    12 points
  5. Bally fathom pinball in good condition. Cabinet and backbox have been re stenciled and painted. New backglass installed Nice original playfield with minimal wear near upper ABC in lanes and around bumpers Plastics are in good condition with no yellowing Small touch up to lower front panel of back box above left hand side of grill. Games presents and plays well $8500.00
    11 points
  6. first for sale is this huge original pinball arcade sign. o asking 2.8k - will update with more info later today
    9 points
  7. Hi Pinballers, Aussie Arcade welcomes to the Visual Pinball Gaming League with VPGL 20 - Ball Save. This tournament is the 4th of the year and part of the overall VPGL 2021 and all gamers worldwide are welcome to play. You can join in at any time and play. Competition: The player with the most points in this tournament will be the VPGL 20 champion. There will be 9 games played over 8 weeks, competing world wide on some of the most challenging and toughest pinball games of all time. 2 tables will be released at the start, then 1 table each week, with the final 2 tables released at the same time for the finale. Games are only open for 17 days each, so pinballer's must play their best in that time and post their scores before the game is closed. At the end of each VPGL, points will be accumulated for each gamer toward the Visual Pinball Championship of 2021 Scoreboard. The highest score after four VPGL's are completed will be the undisputed champion of Visual Pinball for 2021. Prizes: There are currently no prizes on offer for VPGL however if someone wants to offer something up, let me know. Point system: The incremental point system will be used for each pinball table. 1st place will earn 100 points, 2nd place 99 points, 3rd place 98 points and so on. All players will earn competition points for their scores. If there is a tie on the overall scoreboard, then a head to head game win count will be used to determine the final placings. For example, if two players tie for 18th place, then whoever has scored higher per game on a head to head basis will earn 18th place and the other gamer will earn 19th place. If there is a tie also on head to head game count, the gamer who has the highest accumulated game score points will be the winner. Overall Point system: The overall point system for VPGL 2021 will be that points are awarded to anyone finishing in the top 20 for each VPGL in the year. 25 points for first, 22 for second, 19 for third, 17 for 4th and then it decreases by 1 point per position down to 20th. If there is a tie after 4 competitions for the 2021 Champion, it will be based on a countback where the player with the most game wins will be the outright winner, if still even it will go on the number of second place and then 3rd places. If still even, it will be on total points awarded for placings from all games within 2021. If then the top players cannot be separated, it will be deemed a draw. Games: Tables are nominated by the competitors and sent by PM to the game master (JustAnotherRat). Tables must be selected from those readily available to Visual Pinball 10 (VPX) that do not require additional installation such as P-Roc to run (games using PinUp Player are accepted). Original tables are not to be nominated without prior approval (we've had problems previously with them not being competition ready). If there are multiple versions of the same table available then the players can choose to use whatever version they wish to use. The game threads often contain discussions around what version seems to be the easiest and/or best to play. Please nominate tables that you've played and tested (at least a little) so that we don't have broken games come up in competition The number of games that can be nominated by each competitor in VPGL 20 is 6 which are to be made up of 2 x EM, 2 x SS and 2 x DMD. (Alpha numeric games can be nominated as either SS or DMD games at the nominators discretion). The games to be played in the competition will be randomly drawn from the pool of nominations. The order of game play will be determined by the Gamemaster and each game will be released weekly for competition. If you would like to nominate games and have a say in what is played, please send them by private message (PM) to JustAnotherRat by midnight Sydney time on Wednesday 13th October 2021. The first two games will commence on Friday 15th October 2021. Games can be played on a cab or desktop and is all inclusive. Additional exclusions for VPGL 20 and not eligible for nomination for this VPGL are (all games from VPGL 2020 and VPGL 2021): Abra Ca Dabra (Electro Mechanical) Aladdin's Castle (EM) Alien Poker (SS) Attack from Mars Back to the Future (Alpha Numeric) Batman - Dark Knight (DMD) Big Brave (Electro Mechanical) Big Hit Black Jack (SS) Black Knight 2000 Black Pyramid (Solid State) Bride of Pin-bot (The Machine) CARtoons Centaur (SS) Centigrade 37 (Electro Mechanical) Comet (SS) CSI Diner (Alpha Numeric) Eight Ball Deluxe (SS) Elvis (DMD) Fathom (Solid State) Fish Tales (DMD) Flash Gordon (Solid State) Funhouse (Alpha Numeric) Gilligan's Island (DMD) Grand Prix (Electro Mechanical) Gridiron Heat Wave (EM) High Speed II - The Getaway Humpty Dumpty (Electro Mechanical) Indiana Jones (DMD) Indianapolis 500 Jacks Open (EM) Jungle Princess (EM) Kings & Queens (EM) Krull (Solid State) Lariat Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Medieval Madness (DMD) Melody (EM) North Star Olympics Paragon PlayMates Pro Football (Electro Mechanical) Prospector Quicksilver Red & Ted's Road Show Scorpion Seawitch Space Shuttle (SS) Start Trek the Next Generation Taxi Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Data East) (DMD) The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle & Friends (DMD) The Flintstones (DMD) The Walking Dead (DMD) The Who's Tommy Pinball Wizard (DMD) Theatre of Magic Tom and Jerry Total Nuclear Annihilation (Counted as DMD) Volley Settings: The ROM settings will be posted in each game thread and gamers must ensure they compete on these settings only. No continues are allowed when submitting a score and must be played from the beginning of the game. Submissions: Gamers are to post a screenshot/photo showing their score in the game thread. Games are only open for 17 days and any score submissions made after the game is closed will not be accepted. Players: Players can play all or just some of the games. Players do not need to nominate tables to play, they can play any table during the tournament. Streaming games and posting/sharing tips are encouraged, as is friendly banter in the gaming community. Striving for PBs, learning and playing the best you can are all highly encouraged. As all members at AA are registered, there is no additional registration process for the championship. Good gaming and good luck to all competitors. JustAnotherRat @kane@PPLBob@RusstyT@legin@Crakkers@mozzie1@JoeSoap@Bishop83@Capp@Yogo@skids@Jed@Almorte@tcholeaway@AxedBandit@redferatu@starcommand79@Wob@acejas@Kiltem Invite your friends and your foes, invite everyone that you knows(?) Let's see the year our with a bang and have the biggest competition yet. One final note. I plan on this being the last VPGL that I run. I'd love for someone to keep the competition going and will happily supply support whoever takes the lead as well as share spreadsheets etc. to make the competition run. I just don't have the time to run the competition anymore and I believe I'll be even busier next year.
    9 points
  8. Every time I have mentioned my pinball collection with my parents, i am meet with ridicule. A stupid hobby to waste money on. (My step-father owns a few classic Mercedes, but that is OK) Until this week, the amusement auctions that have been going on, must have been mentioned on the ABC, and suddenly I am a shrewd investor
    9 points
  9. It's been a while since I have done a write up, mainly because they can take as long as the actual repair to put together, plus most aren't that interesting as write-ups, but this one was bit fruity - a Super Hang On PCB set from a cabinet restoration that another AAer is doing. I got some detailed photos of the boards condition beforehand as Sega boards can be riddled with track rot and unfixable, but this one was pretty mint. The usual suspect on Sega PCBs from this era is the big black Hitachi module in the master CPU socket, often a FD1094A, or a FD1089B in this case. These are the infamous suicide modules, a form of 1980s copy protection, to stop operators from upgrading to a newer game by burning a different set of EPROMs. While you could copy the ROMs from one game to another you'd need a decryption module with the right key in it to actually get the game to boot. Putting in a standard 68000 CPU was no better than putting in an FD1094 bock with the wrong encryption key, unless you had a way to decrypt the code. So the only way to get the latest game was to buy the official board from Sega as even if you could get hold of a spare module you'd still need the right encryption key and a way to load it into the module. Eventually the keys were reverse engineered (in the mid 1990s), but only very recently (2018) have the modules themselves been reverse engineered, to the extent that a dead FD1089 can be revived and reprogrammed with a new key. Check out the blog post by a guy called Arcade Hacker if you want to know what's inside these blocks, its hardcore stuff. Anyway, along with lots of photos of the boards there was also a spare 68000 CPU and a set of 4 EPROMs... ...which is a de-suicide kit for the board, EPROMs containing the unencrypted game code, and a normal 68000 CPU to replace the FD1089. As it looked like these had never been fitted the owner swapped them into the board along with the 68000, to check if that was the only problem, but the board was still dead. So it arrived on the bench for some TLC. The 1089B module has a lid that's easily unclipped, unlike the FD1094 which has a metal plate glued on, but both are much the same inside, space for 3 batteries but only ever one used, and wires disappearing into the block. In this one the date code on the battery was January 1987... … so no surprise it was dead, with volts so low that this would have died a long time ago. A few things to note on first inspection, firstly a lone 27c256 EPROM in at location at IC56. This doesn't belong on the board, if it did there would need to be another ROM in the empty socket to the right, at IC74. These 6 sockets are the program code for the main CPU and each of these ROMs contributes 8 bits of data towards the 16 bits on data bus, so only having one makes no sense. It does contain code that is part of the Super Hang-On ROM set, but I'm pretty sure it for another board configuration. In fact the MAME ROM set "SHANGON" is a bit of a tangle, with all sorts of files that don't make sense for this board. It wouldn't be the cause of a dead board as the program code doesn't address the space where those ROM sockets would sit in the address space. Some good news is the board doesn't have the hugely problematic TMM2063 64KB SRAMs anywhere, instead using ASAHI brand, which gave more hope this wasn't dead due to galloping RAM failures. There were also only 3 Fujitsu TTLs on the board, again very good news from a future reliability perspective. With low numbers of Fujitsu TTLs I opt to just replace them all, dead or not. The only other oddity was a single TTL IC in a socket at IC105, socketed TTL which is usually a sign that someone has been trying to fix the board before, but this was totally original, and a handy way to disable the watchdog circuit without resorting to desoldering one end of the zero ohm resistor R5. With my power and video harness hooked up I flicked the switch and yes it was pretty dead, but not totally, the board would give very brief flashes of white lines on the screen on a regular basis. (Yep the toyroom is a mess, it's always a mess) This is the sign of a Sega board trying to reboot itself due to the watchdog circuit firing. The watchdog is a timer circuit that the game code has to constantly reset every few milliseconds or it will pull the master reset line to logic low which will reset all the CPUs on board. It's there to allow the board to recover from a game crash without needing a human to power-cycle the entire cabinet, otherwise the game sit there in a wedged state unable to slurp up players coins. For a random crash this works well, but a faulty board it will sit there constantly resetting for ever. First step was to go over the board with the oscilloscope looking at the usual suspects, but aside from a dead 74LS109 in the road section I couldn't find anything by cruising around. There are two 74LS109 on the board and neither should break the boards ability to boot, you'd get weird faults like a static road if IC102 is bad, or a road that is totally missing if IC7 bad, but the main CPU doesn't care about either of those so that wasn't the main fault I was chasing. Super Hang-On uses the same CPU board as Outrun, just paired with a simpler video board, as the game doesn't have as much sprite or object data. For some reason I ended up with 6 Outrun board sets last year in quick succession so I got to know the CPU board quite well. One major difference between Outrun and Super Hang-On is that Outrun actually draws two roads, as there are two carriageways on screen that merge into one 6 lane highway, and then diverge at the end of the level where you get to choose the left or right track. Super Hang-On only draws one road, so the left half of the road logic on the board is unused, which is why there only one road ROM and an empty socket where the left road ROM would be on an Outrun board. By swapping the Super Hang-On CPU roms to the Outrun test ROMs, and plugging it into my own Outrun video board I could quickly test the CPU board, both CPU buses, all the bus transceivers and line drivers that the CPU board uses to talk to the graphics board, basically a tonne of stuff in one go. The board passed with flying colours, mostly. The ROAD LSB and MSB errors (least and most significant bit) were just from the fault I'd already found in the road section due to the dead 74LS109, but that wasn't the fault that had downed the board. Usually you find these boards will loads of RAM errors in the Main, Sub or Palette sections, but this was all clear. This suggested that the fault was on the video board, but converting an Outrun CPU PCB to Super Hang-On and pairing it with the Super Hang On video board got me a working Super Hang-On board set. So I had just proved that the CPU board was OK and that the video board was also OK but putting them back together gave me a dead board set again. Weird! I'd already eye-balled the pins in the board interconnects as squashed or missing pins can happen, but all the connector pins were there and with no signs of corrosion. It's possible but unlikely that the Outrun code somehow doesn't touch all the areas that Super Hang-On does, especially as Outrun is much more complex, so in theory gives the hardware more of a workout. Time to wheel out the big gun, the Fluke 9010A and a 68000 pod from 1982. This is pure overkill for a lot of board repair, but for a PCB that won't boot and gives no clues as to why it is the weapon of choice. On any PCB the CPU can only execute the instructions that it can fetch from the ROMs via the PCB tracks, sockets and control logic ICs. These instructions are all very low level operations like fetching a byte, or a word in the case of the 68000 and doing something with it, such as moving things in and out or registers, reading and writing from RAM, or doing mathematical operations on numbers that the instructions have pulled in. If these instructions make sense and keep up with the housekeeping, like maintaining the stack, then the CPU will just keep working away. If the instructions don't make sense then the CPU will just crash, and end up in a hung state unable to do anything, often with the address and data lines doing odd things. On a faulty board you probably only have a few milliseconds before the crash, and then a few milliseconds of quiet time before the watchdog restarts it all, leaving you with a twitching system thrashing around in a mess, very hard to work on when using a scope or logic probe. The CPU has no choice in what it will or won't do, it just ploughs blindly on, but the Fluke 9010a lets you become the CPU and have that free will. With that control you can perform all sorts of operations with no way to lock yourself out, and run a load of built in tests, if you know the memory map for the board. You can also ignore all the things which would stop a normal CPU in its tracks, like the the watchdog pulling the /RESET line low, or the other CPUs on the board asserting the /HALT line if they see a bus error. The main benefit is that you can test exactly what a real CPU would be able to do from the actual socket it would be sat in, proving everything from the socket itself all the way through the glue logic to the RAM and ROM blocks out in the memory space. On complex boards there is a tonne of logic that controls the addressing logic, read/write modes, and output enables, where any fault can easily brick a board and being able to validate all that quickly is really useful. So I pulled out the 9010A and the 68000 CPU interface pod and ran straight into the first problem, the 315-5195 Memory Mapper IC. The problem is that these boards are software configurable, and first thing the CPU does when the board boots is to run a short piece of code in ROM that write values into certain registers within the 315-5195 to configure the board. That sets up the board so the later stages of the program can access all the blocks of RAM and ROM that aren't connected before the mapper is programmed. So if a board is so bricked that it can't run any code then it can't configure itself to the point where you could use a Fluke 9010 to test the RAM and ROM areas that a CPU on a fully working board would see. While this looks like another bear-trap for bootleggers I suspect it was an attempt by Sega to future-proof the platform, potentially make software development easier, but mainly to make the PCBs far cheaper to manufacture. Basically it is an implementation of virtual memory, allowing the CPU to think it has it's full memory space available, but in fact the mapper IC is intercepting what the CPU asks for and silently diverts it off to the right hardware, leaving the CPU unaware that most of the memory space it thinks it has doesn't actually exist in hardware. The 68000 CPU has a whopping 16MB of address space defined by the 24 pins of the address bus. Games like Outrun and SHO don't need anywhere near that amount of space, but I suspect Sega had plans to use the platform for many more titles than the four that were ever actually released for it, with future games using up more space. On System 16B hardware the logical layout is apparently divided into multiple regions, and it is probably the same for the Outrun family of boards. Region 0 - Program ROM Region 1 and 2 can be used for additional program ROMs or other hardware. Region 3 - 68000 work RAM Region 4 - Text/tile RAM Region 5 - Object RAM Region 6 - Color RAM Region 7 - I/O area So, the memory mapper IC is hooked up to the full 24 address lines and the CPU control signals, and is used to convert it into 16 bit bus and a load of chip select lines which head off to the various slabs of RAM and ROM on the board. This seems like a lot of hard work but as a 24 bit bus needs 24 address lines, and 3 of whatever octal logic is used on the bus (e.g. transceivers, line drivers, latches) a 1/3 reduction in lines and chip count is a significant saving on PCB layout and parts costs. PCB production at the time was incredibly expensive so it would have been insane to physically layout 16MB of address space, especially for a game that used less than 2MB all up. Production costs, and additional PCB layers were certainly avoided but it presented me with a problem. I had no way to know if the board was able to configure the memory mapper before crashing and the watchdog jumping in, which also resets the mapper IC. In retrospect, knowing the actual fault I'd say the board probably was able to do this, and I probably could have used the Fluke to run the board as if it was a normal CPU and let it crash. I could probably have manually taken over leaving the mapper registers intact, but I would have had to have disabled the watchdog circuit on the board. At the time I had set the Fluke up to ignore the watchdog, but the mapper IC would have been reset instantly, losing the board config. I opted to go down the rabbit hole, to dig into how the mapper sets up the board. MAME would look like a logical place to start, but I'm not sure it bothers with emulating the mapper as it solves a hardware problem which doesn't exist when the whole thing is emulated in software, especially when you have a million times more RAM than a 68000 dream of in 1987, its simpler to give it 16MB of RAM and not worry about the big gaps. Hats off to Charles Macdonald who wrote the System 16 hardware notes, cmonkey and the late Zabanitu from Italy who did document their efforts on UKVAC to understand the mapper, and what it was actually doing, their notes on UKVAC were really useful in getting my head round it. Ultimately you can work out the bytes being written to the mapper IC (if you know where the mapper physically sits in the address space) by disassembling the 68K code and looking for the section which pumps data into the registers at the mapper location, before then branching off somewhere else, to start the actual game code. In the case of SHO the mapper initialisation code is this, which is a for/next loop counting down from 15 to 0, pumping the byte pairs held in ROM at 00153e and upwards into increasing register addresses starting at $ffff20, which is where the mapper sits on the SHO/Outrun CPU board. L_001000: moveq #$0, D0 ; clear D0 moveq #$f, D1 ; initialise the loop counter lea L_00153e.l, A0 ; address of data to send to mapper registers into A0 lea $ff20.w, A1 ; address of the memory mapper configuration registers .1: move.b (A0)+, D0 ; get a byte of data and post-increment data pointer move.w D0, (A1)+ ; move a word of data to mapper registers dbra D1, .1 ; loop L_00153e: dc.b 2,0 ; map $10000 to $3ffff to main cpu EPROMs dc.b $0d,$10 ; map $100000 to $11ffff to tile/text ram dc.b 0,$12 ; map $120000 to $12ffff to palette ram dc.b 0,$13 ; map $130000 to $13ffff to sprite ram dc.b 0,$14 ; map $140000 to $14ffff to unknown?? dc.b $0f,$20 ; map sub-cpu program to $200000 to $23ffff and maps work ram dc.b 0,0 ; does nothing dc.b 0,0 ; does nothing Machine code never was my thing, but working through this did give the clue I needed to break the mystery of why two working boards couldn't work together. I didn't need to set up the full memory mapper config, just to set it up enough to get access to the main system RAM. The first two passes through the loop above write h0002 to $FFFF20 and 0000 to $FFF22, which set up the board to have 128KB of ROM (at boot it only has 64KB) and it sets the base address of Region 0 to 00000. This seems to unlock the higher addressing where the RAM sits too. After poking those values in at those locations I could then read the full 128KB of ROM space and the RAM partially appeared in the memory map at 60000-63FFE and the NVRAM at addresses 64000-67FFE. I say partially because while the Fluke has built in test scripts for exercising RAM these instantly failed when I tried to run them on the RAM space, but writing a bit pattern to the first address location and reading it back showed what the fault actually was. When the SHO CPU board and the SHO video board were connected I only had an 8 working bits on the data bus, not the full 16. The fluke is great but the strobe on the vacuum fluorescent display makes it hard to photograph... Writing 5555 at memory location 0x60000 should allow me to read it back out again. But reading the data back from 0x60000 got me 5500 instead of 5555. With the CPU board powered up solo, with no video board I had a fully working 16 bit bus, and the RAMs on the top board passed their tests, but when the boards were connected again the lower byte of the pair was unusable. Pointing the scope at the RAM chips themselves showed the /WR (write enable) signal on pin 27 of IC115 and IC114 was held high, i.e. never write enabled. I could read them fine, but I couldn't ever get them to store any data, so the CPU would have had the same issue. When reading back the lower byte would always be zeros leading to the crash. The stuck write enable line for the lower RAMs is called LWR on the schematic, while the equivalent upper byte write signal UWR was working fine. With the Fluke set up to continually write to address 60000 I could track the issue to the edge connector (which is referenced by the signals going to page 7/7). The UWR on pin 13 was active... ...but LWR on pin 15 is stuck high... ... and when the boards were powered up separately the LWR was active again. Separating the boards while powered up is a great way to blow all the line driver ICs so I didn't even attempt that test. This initially looked like a fault on the video board jamming the LWR signal high, but is actually turned out to be a line driver problem on the CPU board. All ICs have a drive capacity, in terms of how many downstream gates their output pin is able to pull low. The default logic level is high, and a drive transistor in the output stage within an IC will conduct and pull that line down to ground via current limiting resistors to prevent a dead short and magic smoke. In this case the 74LS244 at IC123 on the CPU board had a weak output drive on pin 12 and didn't have the ability to sink the enough current to drive the LWR line when it had all the gates and pull-ups on the video board connected up. Piggy backing a new IC on top of the old one gave enough drive to the line, enabled the lower /WE line and the board could finally boot! It's alive! As to why this CPU board was happy with the Outrun PCB but not its own video board, it would come down to how many gates are hanging off the LWR line. I suspect that because Outrun has a much more complicated video board it has a buffer on this line to take over some of the load, so as far as the 74LS244 chip was concern Outrun is an easier board to drive on pin 12 than the SHO video board. So it looks like the video output is clean, and the sprite system appears to be working perfectly, but I have no road, corruption in the background, and a lot of pink. Oh and no sound at all. The 7th rule of board repair is to take any help the board offers, so if it has a test mode you should use it. The 8th rule is don't trust the 7th too much, as the built-in tests can be misleading and are usually far too quick to be doing any in-depth testing, but to get to this test menu I needed some inputs to mimic the accelerator pedal and some switches. The I/O on Sega boards of this era don't share the same power supply as the rest of the PCB, so you'll find them powered down unless you pick up power from the board and feed it into the right pins on the edge connector. Word is they did this to avoid the problem of people getting free credits using a piezo clicker to shock the board as the input section is only optically connected to the actual game system. With the power plumbed in, three wires off to a potentiometer robbed from a TV chassis and two wires for Test and Start... ... I could get into the test menu. By the way, the pinout of SHO is very different to Outrun, connecting an Outrun harness to SHO will cause no end of damage. The CRT check ruled out any issues with the video output stage as all three colour channels were there and white is white, not impacted by the pink... and the RAM test... ...shows all passes except these 4 road SRAMs. Not surprising really as the the dead 74LS109 I found earlier at IC7 will break the boards ability to see those. One trip to Jaycar later for a pair of 109s... ... and a piggy backed one lit up the disconnected outputs. Piggy backing doesn't always work, but Fujitsu TTLs often lose their internal connection to their output legs, so it is as if the on-board chip isn't there. As long as it isn't shorted on its other pins a piggy backed chip will take over the work with no issue. At nearly $5 each, Jaycar is pretty expensive per chip, as an online fake will set you back about 20cents, but you can't beat instant gratification and I still find it impressive that I can walk down the road and buy a spare part for a 1986 arcade machine. Now it looked a lot better, the pink is gone... the scene has the road now drawn, just very glitchy and with aspects of the road scattered around. Hard to catch on camera but you can see some pixels scattered either side of the central rider.. This quickly got worse, probably because the new 74ls109 was driving a section of the circuit that had been disabled up to this point. Repeating the ROM and RAM test now gave the results in bright green, with a white smear down the screen, and showed only 1 RAM as bad. But it kept changing its mind as to whether that was 21 or 39. The question now was whether 21 or 39 are actually bad, or whether it is something in the tangle of 244s that make up the road logic. During attract mode, or when showing the test menu the road circuit should be quiet, as no road is needed, this is controlled by two signals /ROAD, which is buffered into /REN (Road Enable), which drives the /G pin on about a dozen LS245s and a signal called /SRD which controls the direction of the multiplexers, and feeds an LS138 which controls the /WE pin determining whether the 4x SRAM is in read or write mode. Between these two they control whether the road cicruit is active, and whether the RAMs are being loaded with the stage data, or whether they are in output mode streaming the road data outwards. I suspect /SRD means speed road as it seems to determine how fast the road is rolling. When the road is deselected the whole system should be quiet, except D3 (pin 15) on IC21 there was a very rapid uniform signal... and on IC39 a slower signal that looked much more normal for a data output pin. As these two chips are supposed to be interleaved I'd suspect the faulty one is the noisy one i.e. IC21, and IC39 is resisting it. If the two signals clash while the board is trying to read from either then it would confuse the RAM test but it could be both or neither if that signal is coming from somewhere else, the only way to find out is to remove and test it off board. It failed! With the chip off the board I fired it up and went into the diagnostics again. The RAM/ROM test gave me this.. IC39 shows as bad, and IC21 shows good, despite IC21 being an empty location now, so the testing code has the RAM location labels reversed, which is not that uncommon as I doubt the coders ever saw what the final PCB looked like. The colours look much better, but unfortunately dull green was what Sega chose for the menu system, the sky blue is only temporary. With new 6116 SRAM fitted at IC21 it looks a lot better... ...but there is still some corruption in the road. It looks minor in a still photo but this was a flickering mess in real life. Suspecting there may be more RAM faults in the bank of four RAMs I hooked the Fluke up again and ran both the short and long tests on the road ram which is mapped between 0x68000-0x68FFF in the address space. Despite the fact the road is run by the sub CPU the memory space is shared so it is testable through the main CPU socket, and the road RAM passed even the very intensive long test. While I had the Fluke connected I ran through all the address spaces I could find, had some issues with the Sprite RAM but I suspect that was down to the sprite custom IC's taking control and doing their thing while I was trying to run my tests. Read writes kept flipping between pass and fail, but as the sprites are perfect there isn't a real fault here. I suspect there are some registers I could poke to disable the sprite custom IC access, but if there are I don't know them. Cool effect when long testing the text SRAM memory bank... All the RAM tests passed but the odd tearing in the road and the column over the splash screen was starting to become a permanent fixture. This looks suspiciously like the base road, when it inst stretched for perspective purposes, without the horizon applied and when the kerb isn't chopped up into the stripes. Especially as after the attract mode has shown a desert stage the column changes to the same colour as the sandy road. This took a while as the fault would come and go, but it never happened when the board has just been power cycled. The first splash screen was always perfect, and the issue would appear after the first attract mode cycle. To make it more annoying the fault would sometimes just vanish as soon as I touched a certain pin on an IC. I've met faults before where the additional load of the scope probe annoys the issue but this was rather too clean, but was ultimately pure coincidence. As the RAM tests fine even when the fault is present the issue has to be on the read-out section of the road system, that takes data out of the ROMs and passes it off to the video system for inclusion in the final image. For a while I was stepping around the road circuit waiting for the attract mode to cycle through and hoping that the fault would symptoms would be strong when it did, but I was chasing ghosts getting nowhere. The fault then suddenly vanished, for days, with both cold and warm restarts. I'd leave the board running for hours while I was working and I'd catch the odd flicker out of the corner of my eye but nothing I could catch with the scope. Thankfully the problem finally came back in a major way after 3 days, with the column of crap starting to appear as a few sparkly lines before gradually getting worse to the extent the stripe was nearly filled in fully. With the fault now present all the time the issue was easier to find with the scope... ...output pin 4 on the 74LS257 multiplexer at IC46 had turned to crap. Intermittent faults like this are pain, as when the image was fine this chip was behaving normally, and until it failed again there was no way to track it down. Shot-gunning a board this size isn't viable, plus desoldering on Sega boards is a bit of a fight sometimes, the power and ground planes are massive heat-sinks. With all the graphics bugs finally squashed the road finally looks mint! The last fault was the complete lack of sound. First port of call was the Z80 work RAM, the TMM2015 at IC87... ...whose outputs looked pretty horrific on the scope. Off it came... ..and surprisingly enough it passed an off-board test, and when fitted back to the board in a socket the sound was fine. Suspicious that the heat treatment from desoldering had revived the IC so it was retired and one from my stock went in. The last of the piggy-backed chips got replaced, the remaining two Fujitsu TTLs (the other 74ls109 and a 74S04 at IC85) were replaced with non-Fujitsu chips, and it spent a few days on soak test to ensure nothing else was about to die. All up the guilty culprits were these. With them now retired to the bin I'm calling the board fix complete!
    9 points
  10. I know it's been a while, but I wanted to at least post something. @Fairground I'm so sorry, Mark was an awesome dude and always cheerful. A real pleasure to be around, even as briefly as I was. I'll remember him happily. I hope you're doing ok.
    8 points
  11. Event Title: Newcastle Pinfest Event Author: JustAnotherRat Calendar: Community Calendar Event Date: 13/11/21 09:30 AM to 14/11/21 03:00 PM The Newcastle Pinball Association is proud to announce... PINFEST 2021. Yes its on again for the 10th year! IMPORTANT EVENT INFORMATION MUST READ OR YOU WILL MISS OUT. Tickets will only be available for pre-purchase on-line on our website. No tickets will be sold at the door. Tickets will go on sale on the 29th October at 6pm. Visit our website in the PINFEST 2021 section for more information. https://pinfest.com.au/pinfest-2021/ LOCK IN THE DATE! Hope to see you there. #NPAPinfest (Please refer to the Club Macquarie rules of entry before buying a ticket) Newcastle Pinfest
    8 points
  12. After exactly one year to the day the wait is over.
    8 points
  13. So.......Godzilla.......Looks good. Deadflip Pro reveal today. https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1164809778
    8 points
  14. Hey all, Just wanted to share a project of mine I've been chipping away at since the beginning of the year. A couple of progress pics before the story are probably the go! This is the resto as it is currently. The project is a Nintendo HeliFire cab (if you're not familiar, HeliFire is a reasonably rare Nintendo cab released 1980 pre Donkey Kong... I thought I knew Nintendo but I hadn't heard of it until I lucked across this one 👍) - after completing a resto on that Space Fever Cocktail Cab last year I was keen to get the chance to restore a game I didn't know all too well and by chance this one popped up! I wasn't 100% ready to start another project when it came up of course, but hey, when the opportunity comes up you gotta jump on it 😄!! A mate shared the ad from FB marketplace which appeared to be a Red Nintendo cab, early 80's design which caught my eye straight up. I noticed the cab had a yellow bezel, which I thought was a bit unusual though. It was not immediately evident to me from the photos which game it could have been, so I took a gamble and grabbed it as soon as I could anyway. Based on my knowledge at the time I figured the cab could have been any of the Early Nintendo Cabs like Space Firebird, Radar Scope or any Donkey Kong conversion-era game. The bezel design looked like it was from a Radar Scope cab - although Radar Scope Bezels are Blue. I checked with a mate who checked with a contact of his in the US who said it sounded like a "HeliFire"... At first I didn't know what the game even was. From the photos it was definitely going to be a fixer-upper though! I went and looked the HeliFire cab up to find it was actually extremely rare. A little info on the HeliFire game/cab from KLOV - Info below also available on this link: https://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=8101 Snip for those who don't hyperlink TL;DR = Was keen to start project so I jumped in 😄 Found out the cab was more rare than i had originally thought Here's what these cabs look like as new Aaaand here's what the cab looked like when I went to pick her up: I knew it was going to be a 'fixer upper' all right, but that hit me the first chance I had to see the cab in the flesh. Having a walk around there wasn't anything on the cab that didn't need work. The first thing on my mind was to determine what game the cab originally was... I removed the Serial Tag on the back to take a closer look. Typically the model of the game should be denoted on the tag but not always. As below, nothing on the tag RE the model. Serial 262 meant it was very early in production, I have not seen an earlier version of this cab anywhere to date (hope to of course 🙂 ) So this actually checked out. The early Japanese made Plywood Nintendo Cabs did not even denote they were a Nintendo cab, it looked like some didn't have the model stamped on either. The Serial Tag had taken a big gouge too, which was a bit annoying. I did some research later on and found that these cabs were produced in 240v 50hz also. Anyway, disappointments on damage of the tag aside, the details on the tag itself seemed to make sense. The next bit was to open the cab and have a scratch around for more evidence of what the cab was originally. So looking inside the cab, four things added up for me... 1. The cab was fitted with what looked to be the original Sanyo Monitor. The Chassis was replaced with a Kortek, am guessing the Sanyo EZ20 chassis would have been turfed ( 😞 ) 2. The cab was fitted out with a Sanyo speaker and I knew from my Donkey Kong cab that the speaker connector was the same as a Nintendo cab. 3. The Single Mech Coin Door was correct compared to photos i checked, and it still had the Asahi-Seiko 740 coin mech installed (filed out and set for AUS 20c coins, but still legit 👍 ) 4. The spray pattern on the inside of the speaker panel of the cab was the same as other original Japanese-made Nintendo cabs i'd seen on other posts/forums at KLOV This meant the chances of this cab being a bootleg were actually pretty slim, and that it was in fact a genuine Nintendo cab. I just needed to confirm whether it was actually HeliFire or if it was another cab with a HeliFire Bezel fitted to it. Snooping around I noticed the adjustment instructions stuck to the inside of the rear door of the cab. I had a read of the adjustment instructions which mentioned TUB I/O and TUB ESS, both of which are boards of the HeliFire PCB (the third being the TUB-CPU board). Also, DIP Switch info details number of submarines, pots for adjustment of wave height etc... I cross confirmed this info on Mikesarcade.com https://www.mikesarcade.com/cgi-bin/spies.cgi?action=url&type=info&page=NintendoList.html Confirmed HeliFire cab found in the wild in QLD!!! So there wasn't much else left to do but load it up on the ute, get it back home and start restoring to its former glory After getting the cab back home the first thing to do was take stock of the cab and start to strip that god-awful green paint off the sides to see what the original gelcoat (laminate) condition was like underneath. If it was possible i would have liked to have left it as its original patina for a bit of character. Alas, but anyway read on for more... Both the Speaker Panel and the Coin Door Panel had about 15mm of gelcoat torn clean off the bottom of each. Somehow? I was trying to think to myself how a strip like that could have been removed from both panels in that way. Still cannot work it out. The RHS of the cab had some big strips torn off the bottom which looked pretty recent and made me doubtful of what I could do to leave it be with minimal work. But I wanted to strip it back and see what it looked like anyhow. So I went to work with Orange Goo remover and Magic Erasers to carefully remove that green paint on the side panels. What a bastard of a job. I will say with the combination of magic erasers and certain removal products (there was a Diggers Vanilla scented metho based cleaner i used from memory?) that all the paint came off easily without affecting the gelcoat underneath During stripping the green crappy paint off the side panels I managed to get a fair bit of gel coat chip off and get stuck under a few fingernails too which felt amazing After a week off and on I managed to get both sides stripped down and my feelings on the matter were a bit mixed To be honest, I wasn't surprised but still disappointed to see it was in pretty bad nick. There were a lot of damaged areas that weren't exactly hidden, but didn't look as bad under the Swamp Thing green paint that the cab had slapped on the sides of it. Now that the paint was removed, it really didn't look so flash. I removed all the internals from the cab and laid it on its side for a closer look. ^ As above the gelcoat was all lifting and I would need to either rip off the loose parts, or try to glue it all back and save as much as possible. I decided on gluing and clamping to save what I could. Also, I got onto painting the base satin black again as quick as I could so I couldn't see as much Green on the poor cab anymore 😄 Along with the large chips (and in some cases as below, strips) of gelcoat removed, there were a multitude of dents and deep scratches found in the base. Further to the physical damage from impact, strips peeled off etc there was also the matter of the cab no longer looking remotely like the original colour. It was then i had decided that leaving the cab in as-found condition like this would have made the cab look like a big faded red turd. It was going to need to be colour matched as close as absolutely possible to the original, repaired and repainted. I decided against new flowcoat/gelcoat because of my experience with it (none), and also the lack of availability, as much as I would have liked to try it. A hard, smooth enamel finish should approximate the finish almost perfectly and last for another 40 years all things being good!! Taking a chip off the least sun damaged part of the cab possible I used a bit of cut and polish to return it to its original lustre (as close to anyway) and took it to Dulux to get colour matched. The above is a bit of a crap photo, but the colour matching looked very, very, very close to the original, I think Dulux did an awesome job of matching it. All that was clear was that the new enamel had this really bright quality which made the rest of the paint chip look quite tired looking in comparison despite being cut and polished. Over the next couple of days, I ordered a whole bunch of parts for the cab from different places, clamped up the front of the cab and started to bog up the damaged Speaker and Coin Door Panels and get it ready for a paint. With everything ready to go, all that needed to be done was prep the two front panels and apply a new coat to see how that colour would set! Thanks and stay tuned for more on this one, I hope to put up more of the progress story shortly!
    8 points
  15. Sure are, bit like ACDC. Heaps of those bought in. Put the Marshall 3D prints on mine, adds a nice little touch.
    8 points
  16. I deal with this every week where people have bought machines from Lloyds that have minimal work done to boot it out the door to auction. The cost to get these machines up to the level you'd expect for the price is high. It takes a full day just to strip, clean, LED and rubber then there's circuit board repair and tweaking. A lot of AAers would be aware of the time it takes to do the job properly. Even more surprising is these people don't care about the cost to repair/refurb/restore. There's 2 camps in this hobby, those of us who love tinkering and those who have the cash to pay somebody else to do it.
    8 points
  17. I realised I never updated this thread with new photos. It's been ages since the reno finished and I still haven't painted or put down new carpet tiles in the games garage 🙂 What I did do was organise all the machines and have my first games night in a while. Photos show the new garage and carport space, should have snapped a photo of the deck, that's where all the important drinking and discussion was taking place 🙂 Had just over 20 people there and the space held up well. Plenty of room on the deck and it's great to be able to flow down from the deck, into the carport with the projector setup and then into the garage with the games.
    8 points
  18. Funny history with your 3 pins, Who Dunnit, Fish Tales and World cup Soccer 94....Each one of them had a drama when they were either made or sold. Fish Tales...... was the first pinball LAI sold after importing where the operator could pay it off rather than cash up front. Rumour has it they had 3 containers of them and they weren't moving because the market for Fish Tales was saturated. Very popular machine that earnt very well. Every operator had at least one. We had about 8 state wise.That fish on the top had nearly the impact on earnings as the Addams' hand. World Cup Soccer 94......was supposed to be made in a supa pin size but was redesigned late in production back into a normal cab. I think it would have done quite well as a supa cab because it has a lot going on mech wise and is a little cramped but that is my opinion. It was always regarded as a bad omen dating a pinball in it's title. Supposed to shorten it's earning life carrying a date in machine's name. Who Dunnit....Another one LAI had trouble moving. Supposedly to different...Probably why I liked it but they had trouble moving them. Again, rumour has it they dropped the price around $2000 NIB to move them. I think your got yourself 3 pearlers. The first two earned great money, not so much Who Dunnit but each game is different and all have a different appeal.
    7 points
  19. Having a chat with a mate yesterday. We have talked at length over the last 12 years as to when the bubble will burst and what would cause it. So we had a GFC that didn’t burst it! We had a recession in there somewhere that didn’t burst it!! And now a global pandemic that really should have but actually increased prices by as much as 40-50% on some titles. We decided it’s a waste of time talking about this anymore. The bubble is made of steel not soap like we thought. Lol !!!
    7 points
  20. I went halves with my sister to buy a Who Dunnit? just over a year ago, then a few months ago we went halves in a World Cup Soccer 94. I have a few weeks ago purchased a Fish Tales. These I consider to be my first 3 machines although I did have a Duotron for a short while. I bought it, didn't really enjoy it and moved it on quite quickly. Did I overpay due to the current pricing? Probably. I felt the fairest price was Who Dunnit? I feel as though I have over paid for the other two but don't care as anyone who knows me (from the pinball world) knows that these two were grail pins for me. My wife told me she'd buy me a pinball machine for my 40th birthday after I had been wanting one for years and I didn't get it as pinball prices were already climbing and we couldn't afford it. The entire time I've watched pinball pricing which would be around 20 years, they have gone up. The prices people ask are only stupid if people don't pay them. As a kid I dreamed of being able to have an arcade machine at home like they did in the TV show Silver Spoons, it was a crazy concept at the time but a reality for me now.
    7 points
  21. R.I.P Bill Hicks The current pricing hasnt changed my love of the hobby at all, if you have a few machines already then you have enough skin in the game to roll with the punches. At worst, no reason you cant do one in, one out still. In a strange way what we will see is maybe the great reboot to the old way. The pinball resurgence has attracted a lot of mucky mucks for sure, & lets be honest - when is that ever 'good news'? But, its also generated a whole new generation of younger players. These younger players most certainly cannot 'buy in' to the market, but instead of it getting them down - they are going out go play pinball the ol fashioned way - in arcades or barcades. In reality this is the natural home of pinball, not our lounge rooms, garages etc. I just feel blessed i was lucky enough to get to a point where i can have them in my home. I think sometimes we just forget that our sentimental attachment to these machines is not memories of playing alone in our houses, but being out in arcades with our mates. I sometimes walk down into my games room and wonder if this is actually my life, or have I walked into a scene from that ol Richard Pryor movie 'The Toy'. I try my best to share my collection with as many people as i can, especially those who dont have machines themselves. Be it my son Elvis' mates, their Dads & mums, or just new players who i meet out at work or comps who love the game & hope oneday to maybe get 1 themselves. Thats where i get my kicks with it most - watching people appreciate what we got & i think we (including me) take for granted. Most of the people i know who enjoy playing pinball the most, are the guys who dont own a single machine. I always ask my fellow AA mates with big set ups - "get to play them much?" - answer is almost always "No". Owning games was never part of the deal of being a baller & i definitely think its not necessarily the best way to enjoy them. So in that sense the change in prices hasnt hurt my passion at all. If anything its made me appreciate it even more & more, & motivated me to share what i've accumulated with other people who will legit get a massive kick from playing them, & not be judging me on their condition, flaws, lack of mods, toppers etc. Basically, the natural reaction to when money takes over passion & it 'sells out', is for it to go back to grassroots.... viva la punk.
    7 points
  22. Very nice Xenon for sale $6250 This machine belongs to me but a mate Mark is selling it for me Thanks Ian Click link for more Detailes https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/burnie/collectables/xenon-pinball-machine-reduced-to-6-250-ono-/1282897846.
    7 points
  23. Cool, Interesting to note, Jukebox vs gameplay light show is way different. The machine really comes alive during gameplay. Katz and team out did themselves on this one, Pure Genius Though the shine has been tarnished by playfield woes, I believe the Aussie batch to be sound. My CE 404 playfields were manufactured Dec 27 last year and Jan 27 this year. clear on both is hard and like glass. It appears that some early CE batches may be problematic ? From what I have read early LE's may be hit and miss ? Perhaps a reason never to be in a hurry for a new title, lucky we come close to the tail end of manufacturing here in most cases. This gives the builders opportunity to sort out problems. Super happy with mine its mint, I did wait and was not going to play without bulletproofing. Peace of mind. Many thanks to the bulletproofing brains trust. 404 is BOLTED to the Floor !! JJP GnR kicks ass ! Holds its own against my 3 mad Sterns.
    7 points
  24. I put together a new bench for the new garage and workshop. Too much time wasted in the past with a small workbench with not enough storage space or work space. This one is a 2.8m section of Dexion pallet racking with three shelves, mounted to heavy duty castors so it can be wheeled around. Eight outlet power board provides power for everything and can be plugged into whichever wall (or ceiling) outlet is closest. Three separate spaces on the work surface dedicated to soldering and PCB work, mechanical disassembly, and research (for viewing schematics, manuals, etc). Currently got my PC on the bench in the research section but will probably replace this with a flatscreen and a mini PC when I have the time. Still some changes to make to it but I'm happy with how it's worked out so far. You can mount a whole playfield rotisserie on it if need be.
    7 points
  25. Hi. Just joined this forum today. Grew up playing pinball machines and arcade games. Mustang was one of the first pinballs I played as a kid, in my local pinnie parlour, and it cost 10c a game back then.... Used to love playing one flipper each with my cousin on Phoenix as well, that way our money would go further. I grew up in an era where Space Invaders was the latest craze! And then had the pleasure to be entertained by Galaga, Frogger, Bomb Jack, Dig Dug etc, just to name a few. Main reason I joined here, is because I need some help restoring my Cosmic Princess Pinball machine, and figured this would be a good place to start! I also own a stand up arcade game that has Chopper 1 installed (on portrait screen}, with the option of installing Double Dragon Game (on landscape screen}. Chopper 1 works ok. Haven't installed Double Dragon for many years.... Anyway....... gday...
    7 points
  26. Got this totally awesome bowling game at a garage sale. Seller is in late 60s selling up parents place as it sold and left over possessions. All complete and works. Simple but so cool. Seller said him and his siblings played it alot as kids
    7 points
  27. Saved this from the trash a few months ago. All working, although not high fidelity.
    7 points
  28. This is a fun game. I wrote this guide last time we played it a few years ago. I hope it helps someone get a new PB!
    7 points
  29. 100k might be a 2-3 game collection these days 😂
    7 points
  30. And the last game I have for sale is.... Tron LE #36/400 signed by Gary Stern and John Borg. One of the handful of games originally delivered to Australia. Not sure you will find a nicer game than this. Too many upgrades to list but highlights includes full mirror art blades, lightup cityscape, colourdmd, speaker upgrade, hallmark light cycles, arcade cabinet, hottoys full light up light cycle topper. Playfield and cabinet are in perfect condition. My favourite game of all time so sad to see it go. Serious enquiries only. Don't think it will last long. Will consider trades for newer Stern LE's etc. $25k
    6 points
  31. Unless someone else has a burning desire to be the organiser next year I’ll look after it .
    6 points
  32. Put the cab back together today and dropped the monitor in. This project will now stall for a while as I wait for the control panel from China and the decals from Belgium. @Ryan555 has taken the distro box to wire me up a harness that suits it. So now I just have to play the waiting game for a bit. I have a few more small things to do, like sanding back the control panel surround to bare metal before applying the decal. There are also a few paint sections I am not happy with, so I may do a little more painting. I also need to start cutting down the bezel I have. It's a square shaped bezel, which is what I need, but it's too large and needs to be trimmed on all sides. The bezel is made from fibreglass it seems, and is far sturdier than any of the thin plastic bezels I have in my other cabs. No idea how I am going to trim it without damaging it.
    6 points
  33. So Rich is doing awesome work on the Meteor ! So we needed to try and get Stern Coin Door Slot parts. So I finally decided it was time to start playing with a 3D printer ! So I bought a printer, watched a lot of Youtube Tutorials and produced a fairly good replacement part ...Its amazing how such a small part of the pin, can take such an effort to create ! Design the 3d part, then design the clear polycarb insert to go in it ( this is done in AutoCad) But once the hard yards are done, then I can replicate easy enough. Also lessons learnt with the 3D printer is now allowed me to make the Light Shrouds for the back Box. I also figured out that when it comes to complex 3D stuff, I will get @swinks to do that for me !
    6 points
  34. Well that's fixed. Wrong position.. Correct position. Matches the other side. Hinge clearances are perfect. No more scraping. I love the old school look.
    6 points
  35. The wires to the fish coil broke regularly when the games were getting over 6-700 games a week. Simple solution for wires breaking through fatigue at a solder joint is form a spring in the wire. I had this shown to me many moons ago but I thank that guy, long dead now. Grab a pen and twist the wire around it a couple of times to form a spring shape. Not to many twists or the extra weight of the wire will work against your intention. Now solder the wire on. The wire suddenly stops breaking. Magic.
    6 points
  36. Thanks Jady quickly installed the Snackbar mod. Looks awesome.
    6 points
  37. 520,860 Changed my strategy completely from the guide I wrote a few years ago. I go after everything now. My target for the first seven rounds is 30k plus per round or it’s a restart. Also take a lot more risk to get all four dinosaurs on each round. It’s worth it.
    6 points
  38. Well, after a massive hiatus I got back into it today. Sanded down the enamel primer to smooth it all out and then dad sprayed on the first two coats of gloss white with his spray gun. It's not a professional job, but it's a damn sight better than some of the rattle can jobs I have seen on candy cabs. Didn't bother properly matching the colour to the auto paint colour, mainly as the auto paint was insanely expensive. I just went with a gloss white enamel. Came up looking great. Now that the cab is painted, when it dries, I will move it back to my garage and start working on the internals. Oh, and ignore the painted over lock on the door. I don't have keys and I couldn't be assed drilling it today. So we just sprayed over the top. It will be drilled and replaced with another lock down the track.
    6 points
  39. "No sweetheart, I haven't seen your measuring spoon." 🤥
    6 points
  40. 348,000 I achieved this score live on Twitch on my last broadcast. I am working on some new strategies that are a bit different to the guide I wrote.
    6 points
  41. They look awesome, happy the way they turned out! Anyone wanting the .STL file to print these here is the link. http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3592200 4 inches or 10cm in length will do, 100 percent infill with whatever colour you want. - Con
    6 points
  42. Inspired by @Maxthecat and his Moon Flight, I have been on the look out for a project machine. I picked up this Game Plan cocktail pinball with a pretty much complete playfield but no boards or transformer. Michael (Maxthecat) has been super helpful with advice and photos of aspects of his build so you will see that I have copied his Arduino Shield layout for the mosfet resistors exactly. I built my own mosfet driver board but used his as a reference. I actually needed 11 drivers for the coils on this machine but only had room for ten resistor sets on the shield, so I have ignored the knocker. I had been wanting to try programming an Arduino for a while, having done ‘C’ programming for fun way back in the early days of home computers but not using it for a very long time so it was like a fresh start. This seemed like a good project. It’s not finished as I still need to add extra players and maybe do a bit of work on the sound. It’s currently running a Williams type 1 sound card out of my Flash. I had a wav player installed but it died. Interestingly enough the digitalWrite‘LOW’ I was using to trigger the Flash card wasn’t working but by putting a relay board in, driving the relay to ground the pins works fine, I can adjust the length of the sound by a delay. (As can be seen in the video at the kick out collect bonus). Hopefully the YouTube link works. The sound relay is the blue one on the left. The black relay in the centre is enabled for the 24v when the game is credited up. The +12 and -12 and 5v for the sound card and lights comes from a pc power supply, 5v is split and fused. The lower power supply is 24v for all solenoids. Sorry about the messy wiring but there is an awful lot in a small area 😀 The only issue I am having is that I am scanning a switch matrix that uses 8x4 to cover 32 switches, if any of those switches stick (drops dropping gently, rollover sticking eg) it causes the game to stall, I haven’t worked out how to test this at game start yet. The Start button is off the matrix so the software waits for this button before enabling the 24v.
    6 points
  43. Completely agree. The next 12-18 months in a post lockdown era will be interesting and we should get an idea of what direction things are heading. Also agree on the second hand market not being sustained. Many people seem cashed up not travelling/holidaying, not eating at restaurants, not attending shops to buy shit, not refuelling the car as often, etc...... When things open up and we get back to some form of normal, I can see the wives of many first pin owners saying, "Now I want that holiday, I want this and that, etc, so you need to sell that pinball machine you paid $20k for. You don't play it that often anyway!" I could be wrong but I think there will be a larger supply of used pins advertised in the coming year/s. I've said it many times, it's all about supply and demand. Demand appears to be very high currently and supply seems limited. There are many people buying pinball machines for the first time who literally know nothing about them. I think this will change in the next 12 months. I know a guy that paid a very high price for 90's machine, only to be shocked when he learnt of the cost involved to get a tech over to fix a problem. He told me it cost more to service and fix his pinball machine than a major service on his car! I stressed the importance of learning about them and rectifying minor issues himself. I'm tipping his machine will be on the market in the near future. But, time will tell gentlemen, time will tell..........
    6 points
  44. Non I just couldn't resist..... Probably the best Starscream I've seen hands down without the killer price of the Takara Masterpiece series. The articulation on these things is out of this world...far cry from the old Transformer toys that barely resembled what we saw on the cartoon. I think I'll get Megatron next.
    6 points
  45. Wait until you start blowing 100 million plus song jackpots! I’ve never yelled at one of my machines like I do this one. I love it.
    6 points
  46. Been a bit busy but I have completed the suitcase power supply. You probably wouldn't want a kick from these! Ha ha. Replacing the four diodes on top: All sorted! Now for the linear supply 🤙
    6 points
This leaderboard is set to Brisbane/GMT+10:00
×
×
  • Create New...