Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WPC Alpha: DMD or Solid State era?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • WPC Alpha: DMD or Solid State era?

    Usually people split games up into eras based on the technology they use and the WPC-Alpha boardset is right on the cusp, still having alphanumeric displays like System 11c, but having the boards, processing power, etc of the later WPC DMD machines.

    There's 3 machines that used the WPC Alphanumeric boardset: https://www.ipdb.org/search.pl?searc...dvanced&mpu=10

    Funhouse (late 1990)
    Bride of Pinbot (1991)
    Harley-Davidson (1991)
    (and a Dr Dude prototype?)

    And then the DMD era proper starts with T2 (mid-1991) etc?

    Dr Dude (system 11c):
    Dr Dude (WPC prototype):
    Funhouse:
    T2:

    Do you consider Funhouse, Bride of Pinbot and Harley-Davidson "solid state" or "DMD" era machines?
    14
    Solid State
    64.29%
    9
    DMD
    35.71%
    5
    Last edited by ajfclark; 19th July 2018, 04:01 PM. Reason: Fixed busted link
    Live on Twitch, when I can at random times | twitch.tv/ajfclark | You can vote for what machine I play, click here, follow my channel and type '!vote' in chat for details | Movember: mobro.co/ajfclark

  • #2
    Solid state.

    Comment


    • #3
      WPC Alpha Numeric
      I believe Gilligans Island was the first Bally DMD to hit the market before T2 but definitely DE holds the title of first DMD pinball on the market.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hotty View Post
        WPC Alpha Numeric
        I believe Gilligans Island was the first Bally DMD to hit the market before T2 but definitely DE holds the title of first DMD pinball on the market.
        Correct, Gilligan's is May, T2 is July 1991.

        And yes, Checkpoint from DE in February 1991.
        Live on Twitch, when I can at random times | twitch.tv/ajfclark | You can vote for what machine I play, click here, follow my channel and type '!vote' in chat for details | Movember: mobro.co/ajfclark

        Comment


        • #5
          None of the above

          Early Solid State (games not much removed from EM)
          Second generation Solid State, (1979 on, games started having interesting rules and light shows)
          Alpha Numeric
          DMD
          LCD

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Pop Bumper Pete View Post
            None of the above

            Early Solid State (games not much removed from EM)
            Second generation Solid State, (1979 on, games started having interesting rules and light shows)
            Alpha Numeric
            DMD
            LCD
            I don't really understand the solid state terminology given that SS, early SS, late SS, DMD, LCD, etc they're all solid state machines. I've heard SS used to refer to everything pre DMD as a group, but Ok then Alpha numeric or DMD?

            Does the display really change the game that much (given most of the time I never seem to be able to look at it anyway) or is it the capabilities of the hardware underneath?
            Live on Twitch, when I can at random times | twitch.tv/ajfclark | You can vote for what machine I play, click here, follow my channel and type '!vote' in chat for details | Movember: mobro.co/ajfclark

            Comment


            • #7
              Solid State is anything that is a semiconductor, basically in Pinball Terms after EM machines. The use of transistors replaced relays, in jukebox terms the transistor replaced the valves used in the amplifiers. The only thing that changed in pinball generations apart from solid state technology was how the scores are displayed. eg score reels driven by solenoinds and steppers, then CRT 6-9 digit displays, then Alpha numeric displays, then DMD using a matrix to display animations and now LCD. The rest is still switches, soleniods and headaches.

              Comment


              • #8
                Do you think you could fit the rules of Iron Maiden into a System 11?
                Live on Twitch, when I can at random times | twitch.tv/ajfclark | You can vote for what machine I play, click here, follow my channel and type '!vote' in chat for details | Movember: mobro.co/ajfclark

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ajfclark View Post
                  Do you think you could fit the rules of Iron Maiden into a System 11?
                  Why? Re-Theme? I doubt it with the Sys 11 OS.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hotty View Post
                    Why? Re-Theme? I doubt it with the Sys 11 OS.
                    So something else must have changed besides just the way the scores are displayed?
                    Live on Twitch, when I can at random times | twitch.tv/ajfclark | You can vote for what machine I play, click here, follow my channel and type '!vote' in chat for details | Movember: mobro.co/ajfclark

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Capacity of the machine and being able to program a game makes a huge difference

                      Look at Bally
                      They used the same MPU from the late 70s to the mid 80s, but I would not compare games from either end of that era

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ajfclark View Post
                        So something else must have changed besides just the way the scores are displayed?
                        Of course but I was basically speaking in terms of the way pinball has evolved, technology has advanced with the use of IC's and PC driven software and game design layouts but what stands out in front of you is the way the scoring displays have changed over time. But to address your original post the 3 gen of sys11 alpha and DMD WPC are all very similar in their internal design. Comparing a Iron Maiden software design isnt comparable with Sys11. some of the stuff they use now didnt exist back then.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quite simply DMD=Dot Matrix Display, those games specified don't have one so they aren't one.
                          the labels given to different technologies is mainly to help give people an idea of era, there will always be a grey area at the points of change.

                          This is just my opinion.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Whomever came up with these "labels" introduced the confusion or grey areas to start with (and their massively uneven brackets), because DMD games are solid state as well anyway.... litterally. "SS" describes accurately from mid 70's to current (no matter how advanced or complex). It makes no sense. Nonsense so to speak Lol. It's a bit silly in my opinion. DMD goes from 1991 through to current (such as TAG)... that is a huge bracket... and there is a very distinctive difference between a TMNT and an AC/DC, isn't there?

                            Wouldn't it be just so much simpler to go with what Decade the game is from?

                            The era (and the "feel") has very little relationship to what kind of score display a game has. TNA has seven segment score displays... are we calling it a "solid state" now?

                            Aren't late 80's SS significantly different than late 70's SS ? ... there you go.

                            Same goes for EM's. What kind of score display is totally irrelevant. Just use decades and be done with it!

                            - - - Updated - - -

                            Originally posted by ajfclark View Post

                            And then the DMD era proper starts with T2 (mid-1991) etc?
                            Gilligan's Island is the start for WPC DMD (or Slugfest if you count non pinballs), and besides Data East was Really first anyways, with Checkpoint


                            - - - Updated - - -

                            Now we also have a gaping overlap between LCD and DMD titles, so score display based brackets (and "Solid State" based brackets as well) are still providing a silly big grey area yet again, really.

                            - - - Updated - - -

                            A: I call them ALL 90's pins. Easy

                            *This "classification system" is Completely Outdated and out of its depth... soooooooooo last century!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [MENTION=19966]razorsedge[/MENTION] this is kind of what I was getting at. I tend to think of thing based on the boardsets that drive them as that was what sets the possibilities for the machines and that generally correlates to both decades and the other labels that people use (eg. system 11 is mid to late 80s or "late SS era" or alphanumeric) but there are some oddballs on the shoulders like Funhouse that don't fit as well.

                              You're probably right though, decade of release is simple, unambiguous, makes for good comparisons between manufacturers, etc.
                              Live on Twitch, when I can at random times | twitch.tv/ajfclark | You can vote for what machine I play, click here, follow my channel and type '!vote' in chat for details | Movember: mobro.co/ajfclark

                              Comment

                              Users Viewing Topic: 0 members and 1 (guests)
                              Working...
                              X