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WPC 5V reset workaround.

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  • #31
    one of the easiest ways to judge someones sales skills is look how quickly they denigrate their competition. Most techs fail at it.

    i really prefer just fixing things properly also.

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    • #32
      Nice to see someone from the US make it easier and cheaper for us Aussies to get their product, thanks Rob.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by wiredoug View Post
        one of the easiest ways to judge someones sales skills is look how quickly they denigrate their competition. Most techs fail at it.

        i really prefer just fixing things properly also.
        Is it really that hard to replace a couple of capacitors?
        Also none of it will work if the incoming and outgoing connectors are not re-pinned, in itself a much bigger job than replacing two (maybe four) capacitors.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Boots View Post

          Is it really that hard to replace a couple of capacitors?
          Also none of it will work if the incoming and outgoing connectors are not re-pinned, in itself a much bigger job than replacing two (maybe four) capacitors.
          It is not advisable for most pinball owners who aren't skilled with a soldering iron to replace capacitors on a board. If they try they'll likely damage the through hole and potentially worsen the problem. These little boards are inexpensive and are useful to have on hand for that time your game starts resetting just when you've invited people over. I did that five years ago on my Flintstones and have been too lazy to get it repaired.
          In my opinion they certainly have their place - probably proven by the fact that the person who called them a 'bodge' and a 'patch' is now producing copies of them!

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          • #35
            Interesting how so many people seem to think it's always capacitors that cause resets and the shotgun approach at replacing them. Also I remember Homepin bagging the product and users of them, has now reverse engineered it and now manufacturing it trying to grab a slice of the market

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            • #36
              I was thinking the same thing. In my expirience its very rarely capasitors or bridges. A lot of the time its connectors, headers or tired regulators and surrounding componants.
              I still think the above products are good in a jam.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Arcade King View Post
                I was thinking the same thing. In my expirience its very rarely capasitors or bridges. A lot of the time its connectors, headers or tired regulators and surrounding componants.
                I still think the above products are good in a jam.
                So very true. Problem is the original way the 5VDc was achieved was poor to start with. May have been cheap in the US at the time to make the circuit but certainly not the most efficient way to create a stable 5vDC supply.
                The regulator, the LM323k Texas InstrumentsOEM one, not the Chinese copy some may find if they look hard enough but be quite surprised at the asking price of this rare and limited part. Here it is here...
                http://https://au.element14.com/texa...323/dp/1197405
                If you find one much cheaper, it is a cheap copy and probably not made to the same specs as the OEM device.
                Even with this part, it is still a linear regulator and the downside of these regulator is heat. These days you would simply install a switch mode power supply to get the 5vDC. It will do exactly the same job with no heat generated.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Autosteve View Post

                  So very true. Problem is the original way the 5VDc was achieved was poor to start with. May have been cheap in the US at the time to make the circuit but certainly not the most efficient way to create a stable 5vDC supply.
                  The regulator, the LM323k Texas InstrumentsOEM one, not the Chinese copy some may find if they look hard enough but be quite surprised at the asking price of this rare and limited part. Here it is here...
                  http://https://au.element14.com/texa...323/dp/1197405
                  If you find one much cheaper, it is a cheap copy and probably not made to the same specs as the OEM device.
                  Even with this part, it is still a linear regulator and the downside of these regulator is heat. These days you would simply install a switch mode power supply to get the 5vDC. It will do exactly the same job with no heat generated.
                  Fixed your link:
                  https://au.element14.com/texas-instr...323/dp/1197405

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