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Junkyard Playfield Resto

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  • Junkyard Playfield Resto

    Hey AA'ers, just thought i'd go through the motions of a little project we are currently working on. Thought i'd use it as a way to say howdy and possibly introduce you to some techniques you may or may not have seen. Excuse me in advance for any newbie mistakes in posting photos etc. as this world is entirely new to me
    OK, she came in fairly shagged - abuse in all the standard areas for a Junkyard - but still well within the limits of our capabilities, and miles from becoming 'much loved wall art'.
    First step, top 'n' bottom strip down, then a big bad clean and assess all damage.
    As a rule of thumb there's generally between 50 and 100% more damage on a playfield than what you can actually see at first glance, shagged rear holes, worn rear trails and delams under posts being the main culprits.
    Junkyard Playfield resto1.jpgJunkyard Playfield resto2.jpg

  • #2
    After she's stripped back to JUST the playfield, clean-down begins.
    This can go one of several ways depending on mylar, art and print condition, factory protection and it's integrity etc. - from literally DAYS of goo and gunk removal, to possibly just a custom mix of Ethanol, IPA and suspended micro-grit working 2 rags, then a 3 stage clean - every playfield is a mystery. We perform a series of tests then decide the best course of action.
    Junkyard here needed little in the way of intense mylar removal but required care around all the art as the 'factory protection' took long service leave back in the nineties and never returned...
    Last thing you want to do is create more work for yourself so this is finicky cleaning at it's best. White scotchies and IPA, quick clean wipe ups, and then decent adhesion promoters down the track.
    Once this is done it's on to the 'abused woodwork'...

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    • #3
      Great game. Good luck with the resto

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      • #4
        Abused wood work needs love, and care, but most of all it needs 'sealing' and 'tooth' on a tiny scale.
        Step 1 is a decent clean and flush of the offending area and it's immediate surrounds with whatever alcohol based liquid takes your fancy.
        Step 2 is to give it a decent chew out (and i'm talking 36 grit here folks, no bull) for mechanical adhesion, but also to open up the good ol' fibres and pores to allow step 3 to do it's job properly.
        Step 3 is the application a modified (over reduced) resin soak - applied by brush, air-brush or syringe - to penetrate and secure the opened up woodwork.
        Make a hot mix if you want, finish is nothing crucial here, it's about penetration.
        Once this has gone off you can re-tooth it with anything between 80 up to 240 and/or a red scotchy and your choice here will depend on what filler goes in next.
        For ultra abused holes (think AXL's hole), hack back and use 80, 120, then use a fibre-reinforced filler...
        For semi abused holes chew down with 120 then a standard polyester filler / putty.
        For small and detailed abuse scrub out with 120 then 240 , then use a fine filler or glaze (think rollover lanes, post delams, etc.)
        KEEP THESE REPAIRS AS LOCAL AS POSSIBLE !
        I cannot stress that enough. Wander and pay the consequences. More art destroyed, more colours to match, more $$ down the drain.

        (apologies that the below pics don't show all stages - i'll capture that on the next PF - but they are examples of before & after compression delams, and a finished hole prior to primer)

        Junkyard playfield resto 3.jpg

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        • #5
          Looks like you got your work cut out for you there

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          • #6
            Hi Mate, welcome aboard. That playfield looks like a challenge. Could you provide further explanation to step3. Cheers.

            Originally posted by FLAIMBOY View Post
            Step 3 is the application a modified (over reduced) resin soak - applied by brush, air-brush or syringe - to penetrate and secure the opened up woodwork. Make a hot mix if you want, finish is nothing crucial here, it's about penetration.
            I have propelled the ball along the proper trajectory and been rewarded

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            • #7
              Nice write up. I'll be interested to see how you handle the half tone touch up.

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              • #8
                One look at that playfield and I would of said " No Way " anyone could or would bring that back to its true Beauty. especially the center area . I will be following this thread.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jono View Post
                  Hi Mate, welcome aboard. That playfield looks like a challenge. Could you provide further explanation to step3. Cheers.
                  Hi all, and thanks for following.
                  Jono, not sure which part of step 3 you'd like me to elaborate on... the mix or the application, so i'll do both.
                  Imagine you are now confronted with fluffy, chewed up, delaminated ply. It's not enough to just go swiping filler or putty into it as most do.
                  You want to solidify the base you are working with, otherwise you will get horrendous shrink-backs down the line (wood and filler expanding and contracting at different rates) or even worse, the repair will come away in a chunk.
                  So to 'sure up your foundations' you want to impregnate the wood to a certain degree, and to do that you want to apply a fairly wet (over-reduced) 2 part resin that will seep into the local area and give you something more 'solid' to work with (tooth up with mechanical adhesion) for when it comes to your filler step.
                  If you can, literally set the PF up on an angle that will allow gravity to do it's thang when it comes to seepage, then start gently applying.
                  The first coat or 3 should disappear into the wood. THIS IS GOOD! If it doesn't, then something's wrong (not chewed up enough, too much old wax build up, etc.)
                  Thanks to the extremely wide variety of work we do here at AIM we developed this technique back in the 80's when repairing high-speed Waterskis such as MAHAs and DCs, and also when doing hull repairs on boats like Seacraft Syndicates etc. (see pics)
                  I hope that answers your question.... if not please don't hesitate to specify which bit needs more clarification.

                  junkyard plafield resto4.jpg

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                  • #10
                    Next bit is boring so no pics (tight budget but essentially we seal it off at this stage with 2.5 to 3 coats of 2Pack UHS Clear, then after an initial shock of 65 degrees for 45 minutes we let it cure fully for a couple of days.
                    'God's Oven' is great at this stage and we use it as much as we can, from a lovely little stint in the bright sunlight, to chucking them in the backseat of the apprentices car... it's all free, gently forced curing.
                    Depending on how the above goes (thumb test it, break the top off and sniff it a bit) the playfield can be ready for knocking back in as little as 24hrs or anything up to 5 days.
                    We are nasty to it sometimes, going as harsh as 240 on long flat blocks, (I even started with 120 once ... Ooooooo!!!) but always going up grits incrementally and always arriving at 800 (wet) or 400 on a R.O.Sander with 3mm orbit. (actual machine can vary to a 5mm orbit in the later clear-knock-down stages)
                    Once it's flat 'n' matt, bring on the touch-ups !

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                    • #11
                      Next step is to mask off the 'jalopy' and airbrush in the background blue with a colour-matched base-coat - Pic 1.
                      Once that's dried (2 to 3 minutes) you can go in with your brushes (in this case, a dagger liner - see brush styles in foreground) and swipe in the Light blue grid - Pic 2.
                      Once that's done remove the mask (Pic. 3)
                      Then i very clumsily and casually fog in some areas of colour on the 'jalopy' (using brush, airbrush, my little finger, a q-tip, and a rolled up receipt i found in my pocket). These are just big random tones. They are laying a rough base down for the detail work.
                      It's kind of hard to describe what's going on here, but in a nutshell imagine you are going in a PF Resto knowing that you will be doing multiple clear-coat sessions.
                      Now for starters all the 'not under glass!' purists should relax at this point.
                      At this stage we are literally using the clear as a high-build primer. In most cases up to 80% of each session gets sanded off. It's purely to fill lows and seal each art session.
                      OK now that's out of the way lets continue...
                      ... knowing there will be multiple 'clear sessions' you want to engineer the job in your head so that multiple layer & colour 'art' areas get broken up into stages, so that detail isn't effected by any underlying recent work. THE BEST MEDIA TO WORK ON IS THE SANDED CLEAR.
                      So don't rush. Don't over-do an area. Don't try and do too much to an area.
                      Know that between every clear session you will see areas - tiny little areas - around posts, under ramps etc. and you'll just gently and daintily touch them up.
                      Then once you do a clear session you'll see more, and wonder how the hell you missed them! Then you'll make a list , sand down the PF and touch them up...
                      ...then once you do a clear session you'll see more, and wonder how the HELL you missed them! Then you'll make a list , sand down the PF and touch them up...
                      ...then once you do a clear session you'll see more, and wonder HOW THE HELL you missed them! Then you'll make a list , sand down the PF and touch them up...


                      14681039_1773652376185399_5358163627978835228_o.jpg

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                      • #12
                        2Pack UHS clear as a primer surfacer ... hack back time
                        Got a few questions re: knocking it back, I reckon a picture tells a thousand words (maybe just 100 in this case
                        Once fully cured it's out with the assortment of blocks and start going up through the grades.
                        Make sure to do this though! CRUCIAL ! Place your nose on the glossy surface before you sand and breathe in ... nothing ?
                        Yep, cool. Now knock the tops of the highest bits so there's a decent matt'ed up area, then plant your nose again in the same spot and inhale ...
                        PHEWWWWYYYYY!!!! Congrats! You just helped tail-end solvents escape! And they are MUCHO grateful
                        Depending on the intensity of the pong (did you keel over?) give the whole surface this process then sit it somewhere vertical, preferably in the sun.
                        Let 'em do a runner for an hour or two, then give it an hour to cool down, then step up to next grade.
                        Repeat. Repeat. Repeat, until you end up with a matte and dead flat 4/500 dry or 800 wet finish.

                        Junkyard PF resto 7.jpg

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