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  • Berty's Collection and Projects

    I'd thought that I would start a post about my collection and the projects that I'm working on. Some of these projects will be retrospective, others will be current. Like many of you in the hobby, I tend to spend more time fixing things than playing things. Personally, I get more satisfaction out of this part of the hobby these days.

    Megalo 410 Project
    This is my second Megalo 410 and the first project Megalo 410. I bought this can via GT from another member here. The state of the cab when I got it was as follows;

    - Disabled
    - Missing pretty much all of the internals except for the AC input and master power switch
    - Usual damage to the body
    - Really poor paint
    - No fresnel lens for the RP
    - Control panel was there, but no buttons.
    - No locks.

    The good news was that there was no major issues. So long as I could get parts for the Megalo 410, I would be able to restore it. My goal for this project was to have a JVS compatible cabinet that would be either 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratio and look and feel as much like a regular Megalo 410 as possible from the outside. I didn't take any pictures of it when I got it, but here is after the long weekend.



    To get the cabinet to this point, the header was completely disassembled and painted. The paint that was on it was really crinkled so I had to sand it right back and then use a high-fill plastic primer. From there, I applied some automotive paint (just in a rattle can). After a few days of leaving it to cure, I used 2000 and 3000 grit sandpaper and some buffing compound to give it a gloss finish. I also took the time to repaint the speaker grill and the metal casing of the header.

    Internally, any rust was cut away and surfaces were repainted with a rattle can. For the white sections, I applied an 800 grit wet sand and painted using appliance white. Not that the whole machine was in pieces while I was doing this so it made life much easier. For the blue plastic parts, I wet sanded them with 2000 grit sandpaper and then applied buffing compound to get rid of the scratches. I also did the same to the gloss cardboard instruction card.

    Once the cab had been painted, work began on the internals, starting with figuring out how to replace the rear-projection system. The cab came with a mount for a 32 inch LCD panel. As I'm really only interested in older games that used 4:3, using an LCD panel is never an option for me. I've done a number of cabs now where I replaced the rear projection system with a modern ultra-short-throw project. I really like this solution, because if you couldn't see the internal electrics, you'd just think that you are looking at a perfect rear projection image. My weapon of choice for these conversions is the Hitachi CPA range of projectors. They are cost-effective, can deal with sub-640x480 RGB inputs and can often be retrofitted without needing to retain the mirror. The downsides of these projectors are their size and relative lack of adjustability compared with some other units.

    In the pictures below, you can see how the projector sits within the body. I buy ceiling-mount projector stands to add them into the cabinet permanently. The second images shows the cut that I made to the frame - I remove a three-centimeter strip of metal so that the image was not occluded by anything. I'll come back to the projector setup later as this conversion gave me some challenges,







    The next part of the restoration involved sourcing the internal boards and wiring and pricing that back together as best as I could. Luckily @Redferatru had gutted his Megalo 410 so I bought the internals and wiring loom from him. Then began the task dropping in the old wiring loom and converting the machine to 115V.

    In the picture below, you can see two transformers, so power distribution boards and a normal Australian power-point. The Megalo 410 has two switches - one on the rear of the cab and one under the control panel. The switch at the front of the cab triggers a magnetic relay at the back of the cab and this magnetic switch requires 240V for it to trigger. I learnt this the hard way.



    Initially, when I wire the cab up, I dropped the AC voltage to 115V as soon as it entered the machine. This meant that the magnetic really was only getting 115V AC to it - not enough to trigger it to turn on. I red-did the wiring so that the step down from 240V to 115V AC happens after the fuse, rear switch, relay, and line filter. In the picture below, you can see that 115V output of the transformer goes into the two AC voltage distribution boards.

    The second transformer in the picture is an 18V VAC that is used for the sound circuit housed in the power supply. I also added an internal power socket for the projector which you can see at the bottom of the image.

    Next up I had to figure out the internal wiring loom and board setup. Although there is no wiring diagram for a Megalo 410, it does have a lot in common with other Sega cabinets including the Blast City. I made a plyboard board so I could start mounting.



    So that's where I'll leave this project for now. As of last night, a lot of the internal wiring was done. I couldn't get the PSU to fire up though so I need to trace some of the 115AC wiring. I know that the blast city cabin sets had a safety switch that cut the 115V AC circuit when you opened the door. I'm not sure if the Megalo is the same. Plenty more to do which I will talk about at a later date.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Berty; 21 April 2020, 08:35 AM.

  • #2
    Heads up, I can't see any of the pics on phone or iPad.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Berty View Post
      I'd thought that I would start a post about my collection and the projects that I'm working on. Some of these projects will be retrospective, others will be current. Like many of you in the hobby, I tend to spend more time fixing things than playing things. Personally, I get more satisfaction out of this part of the hobby these days.

      Megalo 410 Project
      This is my second Megalo 410 and the first project Megalo 410. I bought this can via GT from another member here. The state of the cab when I got it was as follows;

      - Disabled
      - Missing pretty much all of the internals except for the AC input and master power switch
      - Usual damage to the body
      - Really poor paint
      - No fresnel lens for the RP
      - Control panel was there, but no buttons.
      - No locks.

      The good news was that there was no major issues. So long as I could get parts for the Megalo 410, I would be able to restore it. My goal for this project was to have a JVS compatible cabinet that would be either 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratio and look and feel as much like a regular Megalo 410 as possible from the outside. I didn't take any pictures of it when I got it, but here is after the long weekend.


      To get the cabinet to this point, the header was completely disassembled and painted. The paint that was on it was really crinkled so I had to sand it right back and then use a high-fill plastic primer. From there, I applied some automotive paint (just in a rattle can). After a few days of leaving it to cure, I used 2000 and 3000 grit sandpaper and some buffing compound to give it a gloss finish. I also took the time to repaint the speaker grill and the metal casing of the header.

      Internally, any rust was cut away and surfaces were repainted with a rattle can. For the white sections, I applied an 800 grit wet sand and painted using appliance white. Not that the whole machine was in pieces while I was doing this so it made life much easier. For the blue plastic parts, I wet sanded them with 2000 grit sandpaper and then applied buffing compound to get rid of the scratches. I also did the same to the gloss cardboard instruction card.

      Once the cab had been painted, work began on the internals, starting with figuring out how to replace the rear-projection system. The cab came with a mount for a 32 inch LCD panel. As I'm really only interested in older games that used 4:3, using an LCD panel is never an option for me. I've done a number of cabs now where I replaced the rear projection system with a modern ultra-short-throw project. I really like this solution, because if you couldn't see the internal electrics, you'd just think that you are looking at a perfect rear projection image. My weapon of choice for these conversions is the Hitachi CPA range of projectors. They are cost-effective, can deal with sub-640x480 RGB inputs and can often be retrofitted without needing to retain the mirror. The downsides of these projectors are their size and relative lack of adjustability compared with some other units.

      In the pictures below, you can see how the projector sits within the body. I buy ceiling-mount projector stands to add them into the cabinet permanently. The second images shows the cut that I made to the frame - I remove a three-centimeter strip of metal so that the image was not occluded by anything. I'll come back to the projector setup later as this conversion gave me some challenges,






      The next part of the restoration involved sourcing the internal boards and wiring and pricing that back together as best as I could. Luckily @Redferatru had gutted his Megalo 410 so I bought the internals and wiring loom from him. Then began the task dropping in the old wiring loom and converting the machine to 115V.

      In the picture below, you can see two transformers, so power distribution boards and a normal Australian power-point. The Megalo 410 has two switches - one on the rear of the cab and one under the control panel. The switch at the front of the cab triggers a magnetic relay at the back of the cab and this magnetic switch requires 240V for it to trigger. I learnt this the hard way.

      Initially, when I wire the cab up, I dropped the AC voltage to 115V as soon as it entered the machine. This meant that the magnetic really was only getting 115V AC to it - not enough to trigger it to turn on. I red-did the wiring so that the step down from 240V to 115V AC happens after the fuse, rear switch, relay, and line filter. In the picture below, you can see that 115V output of the transformer goes into the two AC voltage distribution boards.

      The second transformer in the picture is an 18V VAC that is used for the sound circuit housed in the power supply. I also added an internal power socket for the projector which you can see at the bottom of the image.



      Next up I had to figure out the internal wiring loom and board setup. Although there is no wiring diagram for a Megalo 410, it does have a lot in common with other Sega cabinets including the Blast City. I made a plyboard board so I could start mounting.




      So that's where I'll leave this project for now. As of last night, a lot of the internal wiring was done. I couldn't get the PSU to fire up though so I need to trace some of the 115AC wiring. I know that the blast city cabin sets had a safety switch that cut the 115V AC circuit when you opened the door. I'm not sure if the Megalo is the same. Plenty more to do which I will talk about at a later date.
      Pics are broken mate.

      Comment


      • #4
        Weird - they are showing on my end.

        I just re-uploaded the images. Hopefully, that works.

        Comment


        • #5
          No pics showing for me either... Not coming thru web browser on PC for me.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm ok on my phone

            Comment


            • #7
              Daytona USA Project(s)
              Once I start posting more about my collection, you'll soon see that I have a sickness for large, dedicated machines. If I'm given the choice between a sensible, compact arcade cabinet and a ridiculous, full-size deluxe machine, then I will always take the deluxe.

              A few years ago now, a fellow AA'er posted four Daytona USA Deluxe machines for sale. All of them had issues and the one I put my hand up for had a rear-projection screen which was on its last legs. Although I have my own box trailer, I knew these things were massive, so I decided to hire a larger trailer to pick it up. Fortuitously, the only trailer that was available at the hire place was massive. This paid off because when I arrived to pick up the machine, I was offered another machine for free!

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              As you can perhaps tell, these machines came from a well known QLD amusement park.

              Here were the issues with both of these machines;

              Machine #1 - 'Chrome Bar'
              - Complete & working, but showing the signs of being on location for 20+ years.
              - Rear project system working, but not great
              - Rear bumper damaged and needed fiberglass repairs
              - Crappy Happ steering wheel - i.e. not the 'Gallop' Sega one.
              - Issues with the amplifiers

              Machine #2 - 'Black Bar'
              - Missing the main stack, sub-stack, steering wheel, gear shifter, etc
              - Seat rail system stuffed
              - Rear Projection system completely dead
              - Missing bits and pieces from all over the cab.
              - No Coin mech
              - Busted service and volume switches

              'Chrome Bar' was dropped at home and put into my garage-cade as it working, and "Black Bar' was placed into storage at my work while I went through the process of accumulating all of the missing bits.

              Chrome Bar is a very cool machine. It looks like it was originally owned by AMF in Australia and then changed hands to Dreamworld. I found some AMF tags inside the machine as well as some relics from Dreamworld - Tokens and Tickets. I still recall the look on my beautiful wife's face when I pulled up to the house after picking the machines up. I vividly remember seeing her lips utter the phrase W...T...F... I took it that she was as impressed as I was with the score!

              The first bit of work I had to do on Chrome Bar and Black Bar was to do fiberglass repairs to the bumpers. Given my rich bogan heritage and experience, this was a pretty quick and painless job on both machines.

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              The next bit of work was possibly the most challenging. The Black Bar machine was missing it's sub-board. This is a combination of a few boards, all in one common housing that includes the steering I/O, MPEG soundboard, three amplifiers, DC power supply, and some power distribution blocks. Luckily, all of these parts are common Sega Parts. The steering I/O is the same that is used on Virtua Racing (NB - The Deluxe Daytona doesn't use the normal Daytona steering board - not sure why this is), The amplifiers are common sega amps and the MPEG soundboard is used on a range of Model 1, 2 and 3 stuff and can be easily reprogrammed with some EPROMS and updated dip switches. Here is what the sub-board should look like. This is the one from Chrome Bar...


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              After a while, I was able to source all of these, but then came the hard part - making the complex wiring harness from scratch. This took ages...

              Bottom of the sub-board.
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              And top...

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              Now that this was done, it meant that I could finally run Black Bar, and here she is...


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              The rear projection screen is Chrome Bar died fairly quickly after buying it. The burn-in was nothing short of spectacular!

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              So, both of the read projection screens got gutted and I replaced them with ultra-short throw projectors...


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              Attached Files

              Comment


              • #8
                You're a sick puppy Love it

                Comment


                • #9
                  Afterburner Commander Project

                  So this ended up following me home a few weeks ago...

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                  Some of you may recognise this cab from a previous AA thread. It's a 'Commander' type After Burner II machine. To cut a long stay short, I went to pick up some Neo Geo carts from AK, and ended up buying this too - kind of sight unseen. The previous owner (not AK) had it stored in sub-optimal conditions. Although the machine powered up, the movement didn't work, nor did any of the buttons or controls. There was also no sound.

                  Upon disassembly of the machine, it was apparent that the wiring harness needed some love. There were about 20+ repairs that needed to be made to the loom. As luck would have it, once all of the damaged wires and plugs were repaired, the machine was90% working again!


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                  The last major issue was due to a broken rose joint in the mechanism that is responsible for moving the main carriage.

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                  Below you can see the shiny new rose joint installed in the cab.

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                  I started doing some research on these cabs and found that the base had been re-painted so I decided to bite the bullet and do a resto on the machine, starting with a repaint of the base in the same Battleship Grey colour that they left the factory in.

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                  I also took the opportunity to replace all of the nuts bolts and washers with new, black bolts and washers. I also took the opportunity to do rust treatments and re-sprays of the internal base components while it was apart. This included putting all of the wiring harnesses into conduit to mitigate the risk of future damage to the wiring harness.


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                  I've already re-made the protective rubber guards for the cabinet. Next up is a respray of the blue frame and some work on doing plastic repairs to the chair. Thanks so much to AK for hooking me up with this. I'm really stoked to have it in the collection. (so much so that I got a speeding fine on the way home from doing the deal)

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                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Berty Not sure you meant to have the last photo there mate?

                    Love your work as well though!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cursed View Post
                      Berty Not sure you meant to have the last photo there mate?

                      Love your work as well though!
                      Thanks mate. I left it there as proof of the speeding fine.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        So glad this went to a good home. Made me sick where it ended up next door

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Some minor project updates...

                          Megalo 410 Project
                          The majority of the internal wiring is now done - including additional connections for kick harnesses, etc. I had to remake sections of the wiring harness that were missing such as the control panel harness and some of the sound wiring. Luckily RS Components stocks all of the necessary connectors and crimps. I had intended on using a short-throw projector in this machine however, I had all of the parts needed to do an LCD conversion so I did that to try it out - it's the first machine I have ever owned that has an LCD and boy does it look like shit compared to a CRT / Projection. Sure it's sharper but the lag and blur between frames is really shocking - no more LCD conversions for me!


                          The Megalo 410 is now completely playable. It is JAMMA and JVS compatible, but for now it is running a Pandora's Box 6. There is more work to go on this cab, but nice to be able to finally use it.

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                          Afterbuner Commander Project
                          Most of the spare time that I have has gone into the Afterburner machine. The carriage got a lick of paint a few weeks ago. Here is the rust-proof primer layer...

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                          Then followed by the final topcoat...

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                          I also got the control stick sandblasted and powder coated in a gun-metal grey colour. All new Torx machine screws and washers were installed in the machine, including new bolt hardware on the machine. New dual-ball bearing, 100V AC cooling fans were also added to keep everything cool.

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                          I managed to get it all up and running about a week ago and played a few hours worth of games on it. Thinking it was pretty much done, I moved on to some other projects, however, when I fired it up a week later, the board game wasn't working. I decided to take the time to do some fault finding on two of the four boards that I have. One that was now completely dead, and the other which has a sound and graphics issue. I was fortunate enough to get my hands on a test program for the Sega X Boards which was really invaluable in tracing the faults. Below is an image of the test program running on the board which had suddenly stopped working. All customs were good, and the fault turned out to be a very corroded 8K x 8 SRAM. Luckily I had a few of these leftover from working on the Captain Zodiac.

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                          New chip installed and hey presto...

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                          I've since cleaned the boards and cleaned all of the chips to ensure that any corrosion is either removed or halted from progressing. A big issue with one of the boards was that there was no cage in place to prevent foreign objects from coming in contact with the PCB. To counter this in the future, I made a new cover for the cage using some spare MDF.

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                          Some of you who are familiar with Afterbuner know that most of the settings are applied through the Dip Switches. Although my new cover prevents easy access to these, I am now in possession of a software solution to handle this. Stay tuned for more updates on this project.
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Some small updates

                            Afterburner Commander Project
                            The machine is now at a point where it is 99% done. I still need to reproduce some stickers for it and attach the new strobe lights (Flash boys) that I got from Aliexpress. I'm completely out of space at home now and while I am in the process of building our new house, a lot of my machines are now living at friends houses - including the Afterburner Deluxe. The game is also now running the Afterburner Enhanced Edition ROMs which give you a bunch of good features such as level select, proper sound in attract mode as well as new audio tracks and high score saving. An absolute must! Here the machine is in it's new temporary home.

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                            Sega G-Loc Deluxe
                            The Afterburner project renewed my interest in the Sega "Super-Scaler" games of the late eighties and early nineties. I think that the obscene processing power (relative to 1980s standards) and combination of innovative and moving platforms is really the epitome of the arcade experience. Given that I am going to have a dedicated arcade space at the new house, I have been working towards acquiring and restoring more of these machines. Here is the latest project.

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                            It's complete including all of the hard to get motor drive and control boards which I am in the process of rebuilding. The Daytona Deluxe cabinets are going to be leaving my home arcade to make way for this project to occur. It's in terrible condition, but I am pretty confident that she'll fly again.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sega G-Loc Deluxe
                              Work on the G-Loc continues, albeit at a very slow pace due to work and other commitments. I have been spending most of my time painting the cabinet. I had a lot of issues trying to find a colour match in spray cans so I decided to bust out the air compressor and spray gun. I've previously had experience in using this setup, but never with water-based paints. I've had to re-spray the machine twice now due to muck ups with getting the mix of paints correct. As the machine had a lot of surface rust, I had to use some body filler and spray putty on parts to get it looking good again. The spray putty seemed to react with the standard enamel paints for some reason, even letting it cure for days. The reactions ranged from wrinkling to to cracking.

                              To cut a very long story short, I ended up going with a water based enamel for a few reasons. Firstly, I could get it in a close color match and secondly, the clean-up was a lot easier to deal with. The painful part about using the water based enamel was that the manufacturer said that it could only be thinned to a maximum of 10%. At 10% thinning, it was barely thin enough to make it through my gun, even with the gun settings "maxed" out. The consequences of this was a finish that is a bit too rough - particulary when I have been spraying in direct sun.

                              Anyway, here it is in undercoat.


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