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Atari Star Wars Cockpit Restoration

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  • Atari Star Wars Cockpit Restoration

    It's been 8 years since I bought my last project cabinet, and 4 years since I finished restoring it. Over the 4 year gap I hadn't really considered doing any others, so I thought I'd thoroughly scratched the itch. Vindicators was probably a bad introduction to cab restoration but I came out of it wiser to exactly how much work is involved, and how trashed something can be in real life, even if it looks OK in photos.

    Turn out the itch was still there, it just took something epic to re-awaken it! Something local that looked great in the photos, how bad could it be?

    So I hired a van and dragged home the undisputed king of early 80s arcade machines, an Atari Star Wars Cockpit.











    The seller described it as working, but it was a long way from being 100%. The vector monitor had only partial vertical deflection, leaving the bottom half of the screen blank...



    ... plus a slightly worrying lack of red in the image - hopefully not a bad tube.

    It also had controller fault, the roll axis worked, but pitch didn't register at all, and there were no signs of any audio, not even a pop on power-up and no amplifier hum. Lastly the game crashed and rebooted a number of times during the time it was running too.

    The first challenge was how to get a 196KG cabinet out of the van single-handed, at short notice and with a 30 minute deadline to get the van back before early bird pricing turned into a day hire.



    After a few failed attempts at ramps I ended up rolling it out onto its nose and driving the van forward before lowering the lighter back end onto its wheels.

    Time to see what lies beneath!



    I had no keys for the locked coin doors, or the back panel, so I unscrewed the lid and got my first look inside in daylight, I'd had a quick look in the sellers garage but the lighting was poor and my phone torch weak.

    Everything seems to be there...



    ... a somewhat trashed looking 25" Amplifone monitor, which looks like it has got wet at some stage.



    Original deflection board, complete with burnt craters in the PCB from how hot these run.



    Original high voltage board, with fugly bodged-in line output transformer and gallons of bathroom sealant to keep the magic sparks in.



    Finally, right at the bottom in the dark....



    ... a fruity mix of mouse and rat muesli.

    Mouse crap is one thing, but they piss almost constantly, and chew anything they can get their teeth into.

    Original power brick - rusty!



    Wiring harness - chewed up, and filthy.



    Audio Regulator II PCB - no damage, just dirty, being vertical probably saved it...



    ...mounted to a rusted, PCB cage...





    ...which thankfully contained a pretty mint PCB.





    An interesting mix of serial numbers in this cab. The two monitor boards and the power brick are all from machine SD02069 , which is probably the serial number of this cabinet, but the main PCB is SD02073, the vector PCB is SD00752 and the audio board is SD02070. Aside from the vector board all of these came from machines within 4 serial numbers of each other, so I can only assume this was owned by a company that bought a fleet of these and ended up cannibalising them for parts around to keep a declining number of them running.

    Thankfully the PCB cage took all the damage from the squatters, mice may leak constantly but the volume is low, I guess there was never enough to drip through onto the PCB.

    With the PCB cage out the extent of the mess was clearer.



    Power brick out...



    ... a 20c discount at least, the cab just got cheaper.

    As I had to roll this out of the van onto it's nose all the crap had rained down to the front of the cabinet.



    Apparently these cabinets are a magnet for rats and mice, presumably due to the wiring tunnel that's accessible at the rear wheels ans runs to the front compartment. It is pretty much a perfect artificial burrow for them, they like it, so they move in.





    I tipped it back on its nose and gave it a good thumping until the sound of raining shit stopped.

    While it was arse-end-up I went looking for other areas the mice had been camping, starting at the rear marquee light box. To drop the glass out I needed to remove 3 bolts, 2 could be persuaded to turn, the third would not budge and I ended up stripping the head.

    Even dremeling a slot for am more persuasive screwdriver didn't work...



    ... so I had no option to but to cut it off.



    Which got me in here...



    ...not too bad, more mess but no major damage, all the crap would have rained out earlier, but that's why the bolt wouldn't move, it's in the corner that took the most mouse damage.



    With access to the rear wiring I could disconnect the wiring to the fluoro tube and the speaker interconnects which loosened things up enough to get to the actual connectors up inside the wheel well.



    Harness pulled out!



    Filthy, and chewed to hell in places, the mains wiring seems to have been especially tasty.



    Bath time, a soak in hot water + Napisan and a scrub until clean...



    ...and an afternoon swinging in the breeze.



    With it clean the damage didn't look as bad, it's limited to three sections, the mains switch loop...



    ...speaker connections towards the rear of the cabinet...



    ...and not sure what this section is yet.



    To properly clean out the main compartment I needed to remove the coin box cage which seemed to be the foyer of the mouse motel.



    This is hooked over the bar between the two coin doors and clamped to the side of the cabinet by the bolts and catches on the inside. Without keys the simplest option for the coin mech door is to undo the nut that holds the locking arm in place and open the door from the inside.



    Hmm, there's something in there!
    Last edited by Womble; 20 February 2020, 09:23 PM.
    Sic transit gloria Atari!

  • #2
    Although disgusting it’s quite satisfying to relieve a machine of the rat and mouse shit
    Ahh the sound of rat turds rattling up the shop vac hose

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Boots View Post
      Although disgusting it’s quite satisfying to relieve a machine of the rat and mouse shit
      Ahh the sound of rat turds rattling up the shop vac hose
      Yeh I can't imagine what this would have smelt like when it was left on and all warmed up.

      ............

      There's no access to the coin box or the lock on the lower door from the inside the cabinet, presumably to stop service guys pinching coins. These over/under coin doors have different lock on each door, one gets you access to the coin box, but not the guts, and the other gets you to the guts of the machine but not the coin box. I guess the service techs didn't need to get to their paws on the money and the coin collector wasn't allow anywhere near the electronics.

      Drilling the lock out would have been an option, but also a bad idea as this sends shards of stinking hot metal down into the coin box area which was full of something. I didn't really want to burn this puppy to the ground on day one.

      Thankfully tubular locks are very easy to pick...

      https://postimg.cc/FdDpYvT8][/url]

      ...you just need to put some rotational tension on the inner core and gently push each of the locking pins to find which one is binding, once you go round a few times it will unlock.

      Using a tensioner made from a section of wire coat hanger with the end squeezed square in a vice...

      https://postimg.cc/XGHKV8J0][/url]

      ...it unlocked. You have to pick these locks twice to get the door open as at every 1/8 of a turn the pins all drop in and it locks again, and you need to turn it 90 degrees to unlock the door.

      Success, WTF?

      https://postimg.cc/HVJzkfXv][/url]

      One mouse nest, made of tights, plastic bags, tarp, and what was once the cabinet wiring diagram on the inside door.

      https://postimg.cc/68nhdnHd][/url]

      https://postimg.cc/xq8y6Wxj][/url]

      https://postimg.cc/9RW1X0Yy][/url]

      At the bottom was the remains of a drilled lock, the cardboard fuse block cover and a receipt dating from 2010, which I guess when the mouse house was last occupied.

      https://postimg.cc/Z9mxjngX][/url]

      More discount, all up this cabinet was $3.80 cheaper than I thought it was! The coin box itself wasn't chewed up at all and the mess inside it was mostly superficial.

      https://postimg.cc/bZtm3KvS][/url]

      Nothing a damn good wash in hot soapy water won't fix.

      https://postimg.cc/Zvnc3QgR][/url]

      With that out I could move on to removing the coin door and the cage.

      https://postimg.cc/zyZCX3J3][/url]

      https://postimg.cc/gr24fwJW][/url]

      Disgusting!

      https://postimg.cc/wy7ykd6S][/url]

      https://postimg.cc/WDmXPgg2][/url]

      But 82,098 coins aint half bad.

      https://postimg.cc/3dgy11TJ][/url]

      A good vacuum and blast with the sander sorted out the insides rather well, I guess there was never enough wet to really soak in.

      https://postimg.cc/tspsM6qd][/url]

      https://postimg.cc/hQmXHbQs][/url]

      The only other enclosed space to investigate was under the seat.

      https://postimg.cc/mcrtbGFt][/url]

      https://postimg.cc/5HPQvtMB][/url]

      Thankfully not much had gone on in here, it got cleaned out and sanded.

      https://postimg.cc/DS6Skz09][/url]

      The marquee area got a scrub down too.

      https://postimg.cc/bsXD1M4B][/url]

      All in all the mouse damage could have been a LOT worse, and as the cat had lost interest in the cabinet I reckoned it was clean enough to be let in the house.

      At this point the tear down was complete, basically everything except the controller. Time to focus on the heap of filthy parts in the corner of the garage, before they get too comfy there, or I wake up and find 4 years have gone by like last time.
      Last edited by Womble; 16 September 2019, 08:57 AM.
      Sic transit gloria Atari!

      Comment


      • #4
        Welcome back to the restore side. I've missed your highly detailed posts!

        Brad
        My Projects - Space Invaders Bartop, Williams A-Go-Go, Galaxian Bartop, Jukebox Kiosk 1&2, Jukebox Kiosk 3, Virtual Minipin, Generic Upright, MultiCab, Rampage,

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks, there is a tonne more to upload, just got to find the time
          Sic transit gloria Atari!

          Comment


          • #6
            So the power brick...

            https://postimg.cc/wy3v8KGg][/url]

            ....the coin door...

            https://postimg.cc/Sj2sgh9G][/url]

            ...coin box and service panel...

            https://postimg.cc/wy7ykd6S][/url]

            ...were the main lumps, along with the PCB cage and the fan assembly.

            As the coin box was mouse central it took the most of the damage. Apparently mice don't piss and crap in their nest, they wait until they are just outside to turn their taps on so this area took the brunt of it, as their only way in and out was via the coin chutes.

            https://postimg.cc/m1HgkY4n][/url]

            This was beyond a simple wash as the paint was peeling and it was rusty in all the corners. Service panel off!

            https://postimg.cc/K46YVHrh][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/ns3zPVT3][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/dkX0JWbd][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/HrHkW8hS][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/YGJt5vFz][/url]

            Only option was a good sanding outside...

            https://postimg.cc/sBgf7dy7][/url]

            ...and in.

            https://postimg.cc/R63Mp7W0][/url]

            The service panel and the fan bracket had the same paint job originally, so they were disassembled, ready for the same treatment.

            https://postimg.cc/4K2f1LNM][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/H8XTdT4D][/url]

            I also did the coin reject flaps at the same time as their paintwork was shot.

            https://postimg.cc/nMDFv18R][/url]

            All back to bare metal, cleaned with acetone and left to dry in the sun...

            https://postimg.cc/jWD0Rstg][/url]

            ... before being propped up on some off-cuts from the Vindicator restoration years ago (the triangle pieces from the track edges make awesome paint props) and hit with metal primer.

            https://postimg.cc/bZzqfcZW][/url]

            The worst sections on the coin box got an anti rust treatment, this stops the rust from spreading and converts it to a paint-able surface.

            https://postimg.cc/FdJ4Vh6d][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/2qym3QFx][/url]

            The coin doors themselves were in relatively good condition, but the paintwork was tired, scuffed, and badly chipped in places. I'm always in two minds with Atari coin doors as the original paint job is hard to replicate, originally the doors where painted matte black with a splatter coat of gloss paint over the top, giving tiny spots of glossiness. This not only gives it a strange "not matte, not gloss" look but also provides the texture. The texture on the coin gates is a wrinkle coat in satin black. The result is a major job if you want to strip back to bare metal as you lose the texture, and a very risky job that is likely to get ruined at the splatter coat stage. Some people have managed it by holding a spray can upside down and pressing the nozzle very lightly. I've tried this on cardboard and it really didn't work. So to keep the texture, and my sanity, I've previously just paint over the top in a satin black, but on these doors there were areas of damage to the original paint that needed treating first.

            Both doors had break-in damage on them which was down to bare metal.

            https://postimg.cc/p5X31xGJ][/url]

            I suspect someone had leaned on the lower door while it was open which had bent the hinge at the top...

            https://postimg.cc/v1Kyn40w][/url]

            ...so the door was lightly angled and rubbed on the frame. It wouldn't close properly without force which was rubbing into the paint in that corner

            This turned into a right pain in the arse, as by the time I got the hinge aligned as best I could, 3 of the 5 tiny welds had failed and the hinge was now flapping in the breeze, making it even worse

            https://postimg.cc/3knYKSpR][/url]

            A few small rivets almost fixed the issue...

            https://postimg.cc/xNvVBtn9][/url]

            ... but it was still binding in that corner, despite everything looking like it was perfectly aligned. The original paint was pitted and there was some rust which may have been part of the issue. A session with the grinder cured the remaining issue.

            https://postimg.cc/QV1DBx5v][/url]

            With the door finally able to clang shut without any assistance I was left with a range of chips and dings to prime, along with the ground-out corner.

            https://postimg.cc/SnTb0XFY][/url]

            Most of the paint on the lower area had been eaten into by the mouse damage and flaked off, but a final clean, and a removal of the silver texter with iso alcohol...

            https://postimg.cc/0z21HY3q][/url]

            ... resulted in a coin door ready for a bath

            https://postimg.cc/KkT6gJKt][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/LnkmW68j][/url]

            After they spent some time sunbathing, a session with masking tape and primer followed to sort out the damaged areas...

            https://postimg.cc/bdyXvHyS][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/tYr9bvFg][/url]

            With the primer drying I turned back to the coin box, the anti-rust stuff had done it's job but left a lot of white powdery gunk that had to be cleaned off.

            https://postimg.cc/PPfdBnpc][/url]

            With that scraped, soaked and sanded back it was looking pretty good, just needing some filler on the really pitted areas around the spot welds.

            https://postimg.cc/fVJDR7vf][/url]

            Once hardened and sanded, I cracked out the Pringles and got to work.

            https://postimg.cc/30Bbg630][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/Xrm3GZHS][/url]

            Moving on to the coin door parts, these were washed, dried, and any loose paint picked off, before the first coat of satin black...

            https://postimg.cc/MXqwQJDT][/url]

            https://postimg.cc/qhdTwPH1][/url]

            ...and the whole left to dry for an hour or so.

            Moving on to the front of the doors...

            https://postimg.cc/4HfTkpdt][/url]

            ...and the back of the frame.

            https://postimg.cc/k26PmJnj][/url]

            But by the time I got within an inch of finishing the job, with a final coat on the front of the frame...

            https://postimg.cc/YhyBZGwG][/url]

            ...the paint ran out, 30 more seconds and this would have all been finished.
            Last edited by Womble; 16 September 2019, 10:53 AM.
            Sic transit gloria Atari!

            Comment


            • #7
              Great thread Womble, really enjoying this

              Comment


              • #8
                Emergency trip to Bunnings and another top coat required on everything.

                https://postimg.cc/rDBXyBsq][/url]

                No big deal as I had forgotten the coin flaps anyway.

                https://postimg.cc/PpMB4N4q][/url]

                With that lot drying...

                https://postimg.cc/WD0Rd5qg][/url]

                ...the service panel and fan bracket got the same treament to match the original paint job.

                https://postimg.cc/1nk4SCFT][/url]

                https://postimg.cc/N5wLPnB2][/url]

                The coinbox got the same treatment...

                https://postimg.cc/063yGWVQ][/url]

                https://postimg.cc/ft9T8cPv][/url]

                ...multiple light coats, about 5 in all, and lots of drying time. With the cold weather on and off, plus work, this took weeks.

                I'd also been cracking on with the power brick over the same period. I've met a few of these over the years and they usually look far worse than they are, in other cases the dirt is just 30 years of dust from the cabinet and simply brushes off. In this case it was as bad as it looked.

                https://postimg.cc/2V2TxMZr][/url]

                There's no way this would have escaped the mice being right at the bottom of the cabinet and covered in tasty wiring, and the whole unit was filthy and badly corroded.

                https://postimg.cc/0K15F6R1][/url]

                https://postimg.cc/kDWg8yKJ][/url]

                https://postimg.cc/t11Xgd9H][/url]

                Despite the carnage up above, the underside of these bricks is always pretty mint.

                https://postimg.cc/PvbfjtTp][/url]

                I've yet to meet one of these with a non-damaged fuse block, or with the correct fuses installed. Over the years dirt and corrosion makes the fuse contact fail, until you get arcing and burning, which blows the fuses and the operators usually ram in whatever fuse they could find to fit.

                Time to strip it down, damaged fuse block disconnected...

                https://postimg.cc/B8dJP8vP][/url]

                the replacement fuse holders that were fitted to bypass the burning come off. This was actually a very neat repair by someone, the best job I've seen in a cabinet, but as I'm fitting a new fuse block they can go into my parts stock.

                https://postimg.cc/mh3ThgWh][/url]

                Big blue removed...

                https://postimg.cc/bDkpxzGC][/url]

                https://postimg.cc/sGzyKt7V][/url]

                ...transformer comes off...

                https://postimg.cc/Cd4dXN1v][/url]

                Everything was going well until I hit the epicenter of rust.

                https://postimg.cc/VdD1BZ68][/url]

                This is the bolt that holds the line filter to the underside of the plate, and is also the central earth point for the cabinet wiring. This was rusted so solidly the only option was to cut it off.

                https://postimg.cc/QFCD6g9W][/url]

                I had hoped that getting the badly deformed upper part of the bolt off would allow what was left inside to turn. Nope - all I achieved was rounding off the nut.

                https://postimg.cc/bdPsmMzD][/url]

                More cutting...

                https://postimg.cc/vxXRhDGz][/url]

                ...and drilling...

                https://postimg.cc/9DDM4HBS][/url]

                ...finally got it to give up.

                https://postimg.cc/cKZH49Ft][/url]

                There's one molex pin to remove from the main connector before you can release the transformer from the base plate. Getting this out was a friken nightmare without the right tool.

                https://postimg.cc/WdHgHP86][/url]

                After that the crusty mains input connector unclips...

                https://postimg.cc/rKFzkrRq][/url]

                ... to release the transformer wiring.

                https://postimg.cc/Wdx4gYW4][/url]

                That just left the bridge rectifier and the terminal block to unbolt.

                https://postimg.cc/ppGrXLKz][/url]

                Some people have fixed up badly corroded plates by sanding and painting the metallic gold effect back on, but this was so far gone I reckoned it was toast.

                The issue was the much same problem with the coin mech parts, any horizontal area that the mice been on was corroded.

                https://postimg.cc/bsvRCL8P][/url]

                There is a guy in the US who has remade new base plates for the power bricks, and you can get these coin mech parts from a few places, but the cost to ship to Aus is always the killer. Plus any salvaged coin mech parts are unlikely to be minty fresh looking..

                Luckily I know a guy who got into sandblasting and plating for his own restoration projects, he now has a small sandblasting booth and electroplating tanks set up in his garage. He was also up for a challenge, so he got a box of dirty metal pieces to see what he could do.

                https://postimg.cc/Mc0RKjxt][/url]

                The stickers were trashed so I peel them off, somewhat reinforcing the challenge

                https://postimg.cc/BXctWCnY][/url]

                https://postimg.cc/k66Dk32K][/url]

                https://postimg.cc/CZdKqTHX][/url]

                It's amazing how the stickers protected the areas they covered.

                https://postimg.cc/xX6C8THL][/url]

                The electroplating process dislikes cold weather as much as spray paint, and being August in Melbourne this was going to take a while.


                ----To Be Continued ----
                Sic transit gloria Atari!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great project ... looking forward to see this one continue

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Great story and step by step breakdown. Looking forward to the next chapter. Are you logging man-hours? Interesting to here just how much time is involved.


                    Sent from my iPad using Aussie Arcade

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pepperpotts View Post
                      Great story and step by step breakdown. Looking forward to the next chapter. Are you logging man-hours? Interesting to here just how much time is involved.
                      Thanks!

                      The next chapter should be up later this week, that'll close out this phase, then its on to the electronics, I'm leaving the cabinet work to last for when the weather is a bit more predictable.

                      Haven't been logging time, not sure I want to know, but it will end up being a lot.
                      Last edited by Womble; 16 September 2019, 12:59 PM.
                      Sic transit gloria Atari!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A few weeks later the plating was back, and the results were stunning.

                        https://postimg.cc/47PZLW5V][/url]

                        https://postimg.cc/Xpp3LcyB][/url]

                        Looks glorious - time to rebuild me some coin mechs! But first I needed to sort the reject button plastics.

                        https://postimg.cc/qN6JJXJH][/url]

                        https://postimg.cc/bGQqbyS6][/url]

                        A long soak in Simple Green got rid of the caked on grease. They ain't perfect, and I may replace them with NOS ones if I can find them, depends how they look when installed and backlit again.

                        https://postimg.cc/3yCHNtzV][/url]

                        Re-assembly!

                        https://postimg.cc/1f2SjnpC][/url]

                        Slight problem was that the bent reject frame was so bent that the coin flap hinges wouldn't fit properly into the recess so that flap was stiff and at an odd angle.

                        https://postimg.cc/6T6B2NW0][/url]

                        Some action with a hammer, flattened it out but trashed the paint job. A few re-coats later and it was back in the game.

                        Next issue was the bottom half of the coin mech is held together by the bolts that hold the coin switches in place, and mine didn't work very well. Readings of 250-400 ohms when they were closed were never going to work well.

                        https://postimg.cc/ct6qD06G][/url]

                        Most switches I've met in cabinets are fairly easy to pop apart and clean, but even polishing and deoxit'ing the contacts doesn't always work. Replacing the switch is an option, if you can find them, but an easier option exists.

                        Just swap the never-used NC (normally closed) contact with the NO (normally open) contact that has the 30 years of wear on it.

                        https://postimg.cc/9D925mbW][/url]

                        Giving everything a clean and a dexoit resulted in two minty looking switches that now gave a zero-ohm reading when activated.

                        https://postimg.cc/TLtMqpdc][/url]

                        https://postimg.cc/r0V2rSkm][/url]

                        The chunky bolts that hold the actual coin mech in place got a good polish as they were letting the side down...

                        https://postimg.cc/NL0wG7DC][/url]

                        ...but not badly as the wiring harness.

                        https://postimg.cc/mtzfCL0Q][/url]

                        The mice had been all over these and the tubing over the wires was covered in a thick greasy wax.

                        Baby wipes shifted that eventually and soapy water sorted the rest, which left the two rusty mounting screws as the final issue.

                        https://postimg.cc/4mX0Jzg2][/url]

                        A spin in the drill against some metal polishing lint later...

                        https://postimg.cc/Z9m1Gr0c][/url]

                        ... fit to be put back in, along with the service key hook. This is where the back door key lives, so the tech who has access to the service panel, can get in the back. It was completely rusted before but after a sandblast and plating step it completed the job!

                        https://postimg.cc/4nXtk97X][/url]

                        https://postimg.cc/fk5dwRmm][/url]

                        https://postimg.cc/0KNb67Dm][/url]

                        Coin door complete!

                        Power brick up next, shame about the transformer...

                        https://postimg.cc/0K15F6R1][/url]

                        ... filthy, rusty and probably strongly mouse scented when warmed up.

                        A session with a wire brush and some polish got me some way...

                        https://postimg.cc/jWVsLw2w][/url]

                        ...but as my patience faded I resorted to sand paper.

                        https://postimg.cc/v1dsGJ25][/url]

                        The copper strap looks like it is there to hold the transformer together, but it's purpose is actually to cut down the stray magnetic field leakage that would otherwise annoy the monitor. It was originally lacquered but that had let go in places so I stripped it all back on the upper faces and polished the copper back to a shine.

                        With the wires cleaned and everything rubbed down it got masked up...

                        https://postimg.cc/crpqmqSP][/url]

                        ... and hit with a few coats of spray paint for a massive improvement...

                        https://postimg.cc/9RFsMCdw][/url]

                        ...then the masking was reversed and the copper strapping got a final polish and three coats of lacquer to keep it from re-tarnishing.

                        https://postimg.cc/LY223czm][/url]

                        Winning!

                        One big problem with working on cabs from the US is that all parts are imperial rather than the easy-to-source-locally metric options. A problem when you have a bag of rusty old parts that you would usually just replace. Replacing them with metric inst really an option as the old threads had cut into the base plate, and ramming new threads in would cut again and there isn't that much metal thickness to play with.

                        https://postimg.cc/nsV3KTC6][/url]

                        The internet seems to be full of crazy sounding ways to treat rust, lemon juice, coca-cola, and apple cider vinegar. The vinegar one is pretty evenly split between people who say it worked like magic, and those who say it did nothing, but there was some in the kitchen. Worth a shot!

                        https://postimg.cc/tsNrV8C3][/url]

                        After ten hours or so the rust was totally gone except on the one really badly rust k-nut, so I chucked in a few more parts and left it overnight, and everything turned black.

                        https://postimg.cc/KRLpmR6s][/url]

                        Which thankfully just polished off.

                        https://postimg.cc/kDHLJrBD][/url]

                        The result being an almost complete set of clean shiny parts to dry in the sun.

                        https://postimg.cc/LqVTQWqH][/url]

                        The long transformer bolts didn't need anything as violent to get them presentable again, just a spin in the drill got them shining again.

                        https://postimg.cc/MczFPqr3][/url]

                        Reassembly time, with the assistance of fish...

                        https://postimg.cc/r03gkkQk][/url]

                        ...so I could drop the wires through the plate while fitting the bolts.

                        https://postimg.cc/dkLnp1R6][/url]

                        I'd had to cut through one nut and bolt I was one 8-32 3/4 inch bolt and the accompanying k-nut short. So the one originally mounting the bridge rectifier got redeployed, and a metric bolt from Bunnings now holds the rectifier in place as that doesn't screw into the plate, just through a hole in it.

                        Looking pretty sharp!

                        https://postimg.cc/dLMnNJhR][/url]

                        I'd figured the capacitor clamp was good enough as it was the best bit on there originally, but against all the newly plated parts it looked rough as guts.

                        https://postimg.cc/PNJBnffB][/url]

                        So I got my mate to sandblast and plate it too!

                        https://postimg.cc/V0tgsVVb][/url]

                        Also needed to clean up this puppy, the voltage selector plug. The transformer on this brick Atari's international one, that supports 100v, 110v, 220v and 240v mains inputs, with this little plug-in adapter selecting the correct taps for the region.

                        https://postimg.cc/94xJLT9z][/url]

                        The schematic pack lists the options for various plug options, and this one is the 220v version. Each region had different coloured wiring, and 220v wiring should be blue. Either through age, or by the powers of mouse, the wires were now bleached to a very pale pink.

                        New set of spade connectors go in to replace the crusty old ones and the missing ones, plus a new set of fuses.

                        https://postimg.cc/HjfgTkmp][/url]

                        And while I'm gilding the lily on this I tracked a set of replacement decals, and the correct vulcanised fibre board to make a replacement fuse block cover for the chewed mouse-soaked original found in the coin box.

                        https://postimg.cc/H8jsRZbB][/url]

                        Decals on..

                        https://postimg.cc/xJZSJ0b3][/url]

                        ... fuse blast shield installed...

                        https://postimg.cc/d74FFRsX][/url]

                        ... and that's the power brick done!
                        Last edited by Womble; 28 September 2019, 01:12 PM.
                        Sic transit gloria Atari!

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                        • #13
                          The coin box and service panel paint jobs were done, leaving only the wiring harness to sort out.

                          https://postimg.cc/9R7fF6G2][/url]

                          Before bath-time the switch, volume pots and the coin counter had to come off for a manual wash, as they wouldn't appreciate water.

                          https://postimg.cc/xXfqyFSG][/url]

                          The harness went in the sink for a scrub and the pot got a clean by hand before being soldered back on.

                          https://postimg.cc/dZG9T285][/url]

                          Was feeling protective of the paint job so a couple of fibre washers ended up preventing the nuts from chewing it up.

                          https://postimg.cc/D8dgvcfZ][/url]

                          The mounting plate on the coin counter was rusted so that went through the plating process before being refitted.

                          https://postimg.cc/67L3YMhn][/url]

                          https://postimg.cc/21W3BkbH][/url]

                          Service panel and coin box reunited and complete!

                          https://postimg.cc/G8Xp19Vp][/url]

                          https://postimg.cc/wtdMXCD9][/url]

                          The mains-powered fan below the AR and main PCB was beyond saving.

                          https://postimg.cc/xcvW4Ycs][/url]

                          The dirt and corrosion may have been fixable but the badly chewed fan blades weren't. Even if I got it spinning again it would be out of balance, and I dread to think how many miles this has on the clock already.

                          https://postimg.cc/YjWcQQkB][/url]

                          As this connects downstream of the power brick it needs to be a 110V fan, which means an import job. I could have modified the wiring to tap off 240V but as I'm putting this back to original condition I picked one up on US ebay that had cheap shipping, all up it was only about $15 more than a 240V one from Jaycar.

                          The rusty bolts all got a spin in the drill against polishing lint...

                          https://postimg.cc/XrtHCp2J][/url]

                          ... and the fan module assembled.

                          https://postimg.cc/nCBtrfVq][/url]

                          The final part of this phase was the PCB cage. The upper face was badly corroded and even the best bits were looking very tired.

                          https://postimg.cc/nj7Srgyt][/url]

                          https://postimg.cc/Q9Ww5HWw][/url]

                          I flipped back and forth between three options, leave it as is, go the painting path, or get it stripped and re-plated. Leaving it as it is seemed a shame considering the rest of it was getting pimped. Painting was going to be a tonne of work and getting the right effect isn't easy or cheap. Or I could just bite the bullet and get the whole thing plated again. My mate's set up couldn't deal with anything this big so my only option was to go pro. Painting it would have cost me at least $50 in sanding pads, primer, paint as well as a lost weekend. Plating it was $90 and I could just drop it off on my way into work.

                          The plastic guide rails for the ARII and game PCBs came off for a wash...

                          https://postimg.cc/68WhyGTh][/url]

                          ...and the cage was dropped off at Tudor Plating in Brunswick.

                          A week later I collected this!

                          https://postimg.cc/YvPTCTJz][/url]

                          Mouse rust gone!!

                          https://postimg.cc/BtG9D9th][/url]

                          https://postimg.cc/G4tZrbSp][/url]

                          Rails back in...

                          https://postimg.cc/xctWWX57][/url]

                          ... then out again as fitting them to the obvious holes means the 3 stack board won't fit.

                          https://postimg.cc/fJwG2ccm][/url]

                          Four bolts back in to mount the ARII bracket...

                          https://postimg.cc/S2h9KXg7][/url]

                          ...and job done.

                          Stage 1 complete, garage corner cleared.

                          https://postimg.cc/qtMf1tsG][/url]

                          Next up is the electronics, all the good stuff I had forced myself to keep off until I had got some progress made with the rest, that's all a few weeks away, in stage 2.
                          Last edited by Womble; 28 September 2019, 03:30 PM.
                          Sic transit gloria Atari!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for taking the time to document this in detail, I enjoy reading these step by step restos. Look forward to the next set.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Damn, this will be far better than factory in my opinion. Well done mate.

                              brad
                              My Projects - Space Invaders Bartop, Williams A-Go-Go, Galaxian Bartop, Jukebox Kiosk 1&2, Jukebox Kiosk 3, Virtual Minipin, Generic Upright, MultiCab, Rampage,

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