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Can I use 12V trailer wire?

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  • Can I use 12V trailer wire?

    A friend of mine bought an old arcade game from someone here on the forum and he has got around to getting it working.
    I can't tell you the name of the game as it doesn't have one.
    Anyway, he asked if he could use trailer wire as opposed to using 240 volt rated wire.
    The game uses 240 volts to run a motor and lighting and 6 volts for some small globes.
    I told him it would depend on the current it uses, more current, thicker wire. Is this so?
    Can someone please explain it in simple terms?
    Thanks.
    Last edited by dezbaz; 24th May 2015, 05:51 PM. Reason: Typo

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rich View Post
    A friend of mine bought an old arcade game from someone here on the forum and he has got around to getting it working.
    I can't tell you the name of the game as it doesn't have one.
    Anyway, he asked if he could use trailer wire as opposed to using 240 volt rated wire.
    The game uses 240 volts to run a motor and lighting and 6 volts for some small globes.
    I told him it would depend on the current it uses, more current, thicker wire. Is this so?
    Can someone please explain it in simple terms?
    Thanks.
    Trailer wire isn't rated for 240V use, and this has nothing to do with the current carrying capacity of the wire, rather the insulation type on the wire itself.

    Regards,

    Johns-Arcade.

    Comment


    • #3
      When wiring 240 V , a lot of care is required. Most of these machines have been wired, and rewired by people without the expertise or skill required.
      It is not just the size of the cable to consider, but the rating of the insulation, number of strands in the cable to suit the application intended etc.
      Best get a qualified electrician to cast an eye over it and give you a qualified opinion. 240 V is deadly, and usually only gives you 1 chance.

      Comment


      • #4
        Trailer wire is not suitable for 240
        Simple terms anything needing 240V coming straight from a 240V power source needs to be 2.5MM Minimum The stuff used in houses (easiest way to explain it)
        Anything coming from a 12V transformer to lights can be cable suitable for 12v Applications go to Jaycar or similar and they will give you the right cable

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Happypaintball View Post
          Trailer wire is not suitable for 240
          Simple terms anything needing 240V coming straight from a 240V power source needs to be 2.5MM Minimum The stuff used in houses (easiest way to explain it)
          I'm sorry, but this is incorrect. You can have a 1mm square power circuit in a house if you so desire, provided the circuit breaker is rated accordingly. If fact, most power cables used by appliances are .75mm square.

          Regards,

          Johns-Arcade.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for all your replies, I will pass on that - where 240 volts is supplied use 240 volts rated wire.
            This makes sense and yes it has been modified/hacked, someone removed the original transformer and replaced it with one that supplies 12 volts instead of 6.

            Comment


            • #7
              Double insulated outside the cabinet, single insulated inside the cabinet.
              Cable has to be insulated. Cable is not the real issue, fuse protecting the wire is! Over rate the fuse for the cable and things go wrong, i.e. fuse does not blow in time to protect the cable.
              Under rate the fuse and not a big deal as fuse blows before cable fails.
              Any 240v work should be done by a licensed sparky.
              The plug lead should be capable of handling current from up stream device before failing.
              This is why your safety switch was implemented as they are excellent for quick tripping to prevent fires and shock!
              Does his premise have an RCD? start there first. Sort of an insurance for the DIY Dudes.

              Comment


              • #8
                RCD? is this the same as an ELCB, earth leakage circuit breaker?

                Comment


                • #9
                  RCD = Residual Current Device .. ELCB ... Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker But yes same function, different name.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Johns-Arcade View Post
                    I'm sorry, but this is incorrect. You can have a 1mm square power circuit in a house if you so desire, provided the circuit breaker is rated accordingly. If fact, most power cables used by appliances are .75mm square.

                    Regards,

                    Johns-Arcade.
                    Any cable going from the meter board to power points in a house has to be 2.5mm minimum by law
                    Lighting can be a minimum 1mm
                    Yes appliances can use .75mm wire but they plug into the power points I was just trying to keep it simple so he did not overload and melt his cables or set fire to his house

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Happypaintball View Post
                      Any cable going from the meter board to power points in a house has to be 2.5mm minimum by law
                      Lighting can be a minimum 1mm
                      Yes appliances can use .75mm wire but they plug into the power points I was just trying to keep it simple so he did not overload and melt his cables or set fire to his house
                      Are you an electrician?

                      Regards,

                      Johns-Arcade.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Johns-Arcade View Post
                        Are you an electrician?

                        Regards,

                        Johns-Arcade.
                        Apparently NOT

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You guys are getting a bit technical for him, simply you rate the cable for the load drawn in amps (amount of current the load draws) depending on its application. There are different standards associated with fixed wiring as opposed to appliance wiring. Just make sure that you are protected at the switchboard and if it was me I would use a cable that is double insulated

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                          • #14
                            Simple answer. Walk past the trailer wire to the extension cords. Strip one down.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Jst notist I splelt trailer rong. DOH!
                              Thanks for all the replies.
                              My mate is getting it going and selling it to one of his mates. He hasn't worked on an amusement machine before.
                              It has a few leaf switches a transformer, some general 240V lighting and 6V lighting for the doors/letterboxes you manage to.... ? I dunno, there's a large red drum with small cast doors on it driven by a 240V motor and as the drum rotates you turn a wheel which moves a figure and try to flick open the doors, as this happens the door opened switches the associated 6V light.
                              The 240V wiring is falling off it's so brittle.
                              Last edited by Rich; 24th May 2015, 05:05 PM. Reason: more spelling mistakes

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