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Topics related to the hardware and software used in setting up a MAME cab IE. Jpac, frontend and OS

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    #16
    [MENTION=16024]buttersoft[/MENTION] Thanks man, that's awesome news, I look forward to enabling this for all my emulated games...

    Ok, regarding the cable, how do I know which one has that resistor? Which one should I buy?

    I also just did the same test on my N64 cable which is the same, still get 1 for resistance.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Domarius View Post
      Ok, regarding the cable, how do I know which one has that resistor? Which one should I buy?

      I also just did the same test on my N64 cable which is the same, still get 1 for resistance.
      Hmm, it should test the same as the SNES cable, i believe, at 75ohms. Yellow-ended cable plug, one probe on centre-pin, one on outer ring. The meter reads zero when you touch the probes together? And... something, maybe about 10Mohms, just not zero or 1/OL when you touch a probe with each finger?

      Any PAL N64 cable should do fine. However, if you get on Facebook there are at least 5 or 6 dedicated nintendo retro gaming buy & sell groups. That way you could go for an original Nintendo cable.

      You should be able to use the N64 cable in the SNES. Does it do anything different on that TV? What about the SNES cable on the N64? If the N64 is the same, and the SNES is the same, it might not be the cables at fault. Then again, the SNES isn't necessarily outputting the same levels as the N64 - they'll be close, but they don't have to be identical.

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        #18
        [MENTION=16024]buttersoft[/MENTION] - I'm back again you can expect me to be dipping into this when I have time & when it frustrates me not having it. I have a new reason bearing down on me - the very cool retro 4:3 style games made in modern times on steam (Towerfall Ascension, Shovel Knight, Shantae Risky's Revenge, etc.) run too slow or not at all on my extremely old S-Video card! But I have a ATi Radeon HD 5670 ready to go - it just doesn't output S-Video or Component of course, and so won't work on my CRT TV.

        So I'm looking into your suggestion for a VGA to Component transcoder (using a DVI to VGA adaptor of course). When I look for this kind of thing on eBay, I get these things, around $30. Is this it, or is this some cheap thing that won't actually convert the signal properly?
        Shop by Category | eBay

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          #19
          Your link is HDMI-to or HDMI-from converters. You don't want HDMI anything You want a VGA-to-YPbPr or VGA-to-Component transcoder. Or a SCART-to-Component/YPbPr one. VGA is probably easier, as the cable is just your run of the mill VGA cable.

          I've been keeping an eye out and something like this is probably ok - +Nice Digital Processing Systems DPS-230 Component TBS / Framestore CANADA | eBay

          Model number is there, so see if you can find it, or something like it, for cheaper mb. Shipping would be a bit of a bitch.

          Note the important bits of the description:

          The Retrotek VGACTV1 is a transcoder solution that can completely passively convert any RGBHV or RGBS video into component video with a 100% scalable resolution input/output range from 240p to 1080i. The transcoder does not process any synchronization timing into any discrete steps or apply any or signal processing so ANY resolution will be properly converted to component video output, including all of the non-standard arcade resolutions. This transcoder can handle ANY incoming HV Sync or Composite Sync, both of any polarity or even if the HV sync is of opposite polarities. All incoming sync signals will be properly converted to an accurate negative sync tip for component video with correct timing and voltage. This makes this transcoder virtually guaranteed to work with all types of RGBHV or RGBs inputs you can throw at it! Comes with converter box and accompanying power supply, so everything is ready to go on arrival!
          VGA is RGBHV (R,G,B, Horizontal Sync and Vertical Sync)

          This device does not have 15kHz protection though, so the PC has to be outputting 15kHz-only because your monitor is 15kHz. Once crt_emudriver 2.0 is installed, Windows only has access to 15kHz resolutions so you don't have to worry. But the PC will still be using 31kHz or more during boot unless you go the Atom15 route i mentioned on the previous page. Or just wait until you've booted to Windows before turning on the TV.

          EDIT: actually, there's another thread right now about building your own RGB-to-YPbPr converter, but it's not complete. Not for the faint of heart right now
          Silicon Chip Subscribers - Aussie Arcade
          Last edited by buttersoft; 3 May 2017, 09:43 AM.

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            #20
            So [MENTION=16024]buttersoft[/MENTION] - would this work with an arcade PCB's RGBs output?


            Sent from my iPhone using Aussie Arcade

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              #21
              Originally posted by MarkOZLAD View Post
              So [MENTION=16024]buttersoft[/MENTION] - would this work with an arcade PCB's RGBs output?


              Sent from my iPhone using Aussie Arcade


              Arcade video input signals need some special care on the RGB lines, while sync can be directly connect (whether its horizontal sync or HV Sync). This transcoder expects an standard RGB input signal of 0.7Vpp, however most arcade boards operate at around 2.4-3V on the RGB lines, so you will need to drop this voltage accordingly with a resistor divider or insert series resistors on the RGB lines (the transcoder terminates the RGB signals at 75 ohms).
              You could probably just use a resistor and a 1k pot in each line though, but don't quote me on that.

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                #22
                So should work with the output from my RGBs to Scart adapter then...

                Error Page | eBay

                That would be good because it has Scart and RGBs BNC outputs that can operate simultaneously.


                Sent from my iPhone using Aussie Arcade

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                  #23
                  The levels will be fine from that supergun, and the converter unit takes C-sync happily, but you'd need a way to get the SCART socket to the VGA socket.

                  I believe most passive VGA-to-SCART cables/adapters/gear would wire VGA pin 13 (H- or C-sync) to SCART pin 20 (Video in - the line used for sync) but can't confirm that. The problem might be that SCART uses different pins for Video-in (pin 20) and Video-out (Pin 19), making each male-male SCART cable a crossover cable not a patch cable. So a VGA-to-SCART adapter possibly wouldn't work backward. I don't know enough about the usual practice there.

                  The listing you posted has ended, so I can't see any good pics or specs :/

                  EDIT: sorry, didn't see the BNC bit. A VGA-to-5-BNC cable should work fine if the supergun outputs via BNC connectors. Get a 5-BNC cable rather than a 4-BNC option as it'll be more functional later to connect a PC to an arcade monitor or PVM - Link
                  Last edited by buttersoft; 3 May 2017, 09:48 AM.

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                    #24
                    Scart and BNC PVM RGBs Breakout board

                    for use with Jamma RGBs to Scart or BNC

                    or

                    Breakout of Console RGBs to Scart or BNC

                    Have you ever had the problem of not having the correct type of RGB cable for your console or want to hook up a Jamma arcade PCB to your TV

                    Or even worse still have a nice PVM/BVM monitor and no way to connect to it

                    well with this breakout board you can do exactly that

                    Has a direct connection to RGBs and Audio

                    or you can put the signal trough the attached POT to attenuate the signal

                    with the added addition of a Sync Stripper if needed

                    330 or 390 Ohms for Arcade RGB and 1K Ohm for Sync

                    75 Ohms for conevential Consoles

                    or just have the singal direct if you have internal resistors installed

                    Ideal for Superguns, CMVS, AES, N64, SNES, PC Engine use or testing purposes on your test bench

                    can be used to also strip the sync off PS2, Saturn and many others

                    Youtube video of it in action here





                    Please Note:

                    Jumper and Screw Terminal Colours may vary

                    These will come fully soldered for your convenience, the POTS will be 470 Ohm on the Colour and 2K2 Ohms on the Sync. if you wish for a custom value then please message me at the time of purchase.
                    Click image for larger version

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                    Only has four BNC outputs...

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by MarkOZLAD View Post
                      Only has four BNC outputs...
                      That's fine. The VGA-to-5-BNC cable (in this case running backwards) will work to carry RGBS over 4 lines. And the converter I linked says it takes C-Sync.

                      The recommendation was more about the fact that no modern or semi-modern GPU can output c-sync over VGA, so the 5 cables would be needed to get a complete RGBHV signal out of a PC, if you wanted to do that down the track. You'd need to for a PVM, or to use an Extron or other scaler or sync-combiner.

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                        #26
                        One detail I forgot to mention:

                        You may want to confirm that the unit I linked to can handle 2560x240p i.e "Super Resolutions". I'd guess at a firm yes, but you could msg the seller to make sure. Same goes for any competing unit you find.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by buttersoft View Post
                          That's fine. The VGA-to-5-BNC cable (in this case running backwards) will work to carry RGBS over 4 lines. And the converter I linked says it takes C-Sync.

                          The recommendation was more about the fact that no modern or semi-modern GPU can output c-sync over VGA, so the 5 cables would be needed to get a complete RGBHV signal out of a PC, if you wanted to do that down the track. You'd need to for a PVM, or to use an Extron or other scaler or sync-combiner.
                          I see some chips that split vertical sync from composite sync, can composite sync be fed into the Horizontal Sync? So split out the V-Sync and the pass it in as V-Sync (of course) and the C-Sync as H-Sync?

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by MarkOZLAD View Post
                            I see some chips that split vertical sync from composite sync, can composite sync be fed into the Horizontal Sync? So split out the V-Sync and the pass it in as V-Sync (of course) and the C-Sync as H-Sync?
                            Depends on the scenario. If you're referring to the VGA-to-YPbPr unit I linked to above, there's no need. Composite sync is an amalgam of H- and V-sync, and the unit is question takes Composite-sync on the H-sync line. It's in the description.

                            If something takes both Composite- or separate H- and V-sync, 99% of the time C-sync goes into the same place as the H-sync would. Sometimes you have to tell the device or chassis or whatever it is about the sync, but a lot are automatic. I believe there are even devices that can work out C-sync when only given H-sync, but you can't rely on that.

                            If you have a device that needs separate sync, something like the LM1881 will normally work. You can feed that IC either Composite Video or Composite Sync. You then feed the outputted C-sync into your device on the H-sync line, and V-sync is V-sync. Different IC's might be affected by differing sync polarities, though. The norm is to have black level at ground or zero volts. All the video information is above zero volts, and the sync information is below, or negative. Some devices use positive polarity on one or both sync channels though, and you can set your PC to deliver that if needed. Other devices and IC's you'd have to deal with as required.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by buttersoft View Post
                              If you have a device that needs separate sync, something like the LM1881 will normally work. You can feed that IC either Composite Video or Composite Sync. You then feed the outputted C-sync into your device on the H-sync line, and V-sync is V-sync.
                              Exactly the scenario I was thinking of.


                              Sent from my iPhone using Aussie Arcade

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                                #30
                                previous post edited with more info

                                The short answer was yes.

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