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  • PCB storage. What is the best way?

    Hello all,

    Just wanted to know what the forum members think is the best way to store their PCB collections?

    I currently wrap each in bubble wrap and place in postage boxes.
    The boxes are stored upright closed, not stacked.

    I have had a few games die recently and would appreciate any tips that anyone might have.

    Does anyone use anything to absorb moisture?
    (I am thinking of something like the little sachels of crystals that come with shoes)

  • #2
    The best way to store them is in a dedicated cab...that you play...often...
    ...maybe, but then again "maybe" covers a lot of things, like: maybe Michael Jackson really is LaToya in drag, or maybe if Dorothy clicks her heels 3 times and says "There's no place like home" while she is at home, she would telefrag herself..." - MadMikeAU

    | My | |

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    • #3
      Thanks for the insight

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      • #4
        I bubblewrap them (use anti-static if I can), then they go into 90Lt plastic tubs with lids. I throw some newspaper in there for moisture absortion. Where I store them is very dry and elevated. (It's actually probably a bit too hot in summer).
        The Pinny Parlour likes this post.

        The Pinny Parlour Welcomes you to Aussie Arcade.

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        • #5
          At my place

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          • #6
            Older game boards are fine to store with bubble wrap. I only keep new boards with surface mounted stuff in anti static bags as the old stuff is pretty tough when it comes to static.

            Those Green ones I use to get from Gavin work great.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RedneckV2
              Hello all,

              Just wanted to know what the forum members think is the best way to store their PCB collections?

              I currently wrap each in bubble wrap and place in postage boxes.
              The boxes are stored upright closed, not stacked.

              I have had a few games die recently and would appreciate any tips that anyone might have.

              Does anyone use anything to absorb moisture?
              (I am thinking of something like the little sachels of crystals that come with shoes)
              Come on guys. Everyone knows the best way is in "fruit boxes"!
              Bite my shiny metal ass!

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              • #8
                pretty much antistatic bubblewrap with them sitting on edge on shelving.

                AS long as they aren't taken to extremes or stored in corrosive conditions (ie, Warm and Humid), there fine.

                As for them dying, fact of life. These things are way past there use by dates. Some of these chips running on the older stuff have exceded the mtbf that was origianlly given when they where first making it, after a while they rarely give that info unless asked.

                When it comes done to it, you have billions of transistors all in very small amount of silicon, it only takes 1 to die to stop a game working.

                Also, thermal shock can kill ic's. If there are not up to a resonable temp (20' +) and you power them up, the expansion on the dies due to the sudden heating can cause cracking.

                There is another thing called electron tunneling, where on any corner on the tracks in the silicon die, the electrons will over a period of time wear a hole (to dumd it down ) thru the track into the next, and then causes a short between them, then a casae failure and the chip dies. This happens more so on the later stuff due to the compression they have done over the years. THe x-sistor count per square millimetre is far greater on a P4 then a 74ls174. This probally helps in the longevity of these less dense chips. When you start working on a lot of classic era game boards, you start to find patterns in chip types/batches/brands. The chips going are look to be either bad batches (Fujitsu 74ls157's date code 8245 trhu to 8350, anyone care to disspell??) or ones that have a high workload (2114's srams, some z80's, those bloody rams of jamma stuff)

                If anyones wondering why it's such a long post, I copped a good welding flash at work so I'm awake with a seriously bad runny nose, sore as f*** eyeballs, and can't sleep. . Ah well, might as well get anebriated

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                • #9
                  Interesting stuff and very well put
                  Thanks

                  But ? Apple Boxes ?

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