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Slammm
22nd August 2009, 10:39 AM
Hello all, I hope it is ok to ask this question here (not being an arcade guy)
I'm a pinstripe / airbrush artist who just bought a 1970's home model machine for an art project.
The play surface appears to be a sreenprinted wood. If I just go and repaint I wonder about any brushstrokes interfearing with gameplay... plus I would maybe like to add lighting under playfield.

What can playfields be made from?

Is an acrylic an acceptable surface? if not, an automotive urethane clearcoat? a teldar laminate?


sorry, I know it's a stupid question

some of my art here... www.myspace.com/slamgraphics

Fish Tales
22nd August 2009, 12:24 PM
Playfields are plywood (very few were chipboard). Enamel paints usually used. To preserve the paintwork you can clear coat, or mylar (thin clear film like contact). Mylaring or contacting may answer you brushstroke issue, maybe you could airbrush :unsure

bwodie
22nd August 2009, 12:27 PM
your art is impressive!

Slammm
25th August 2009, 08:05 AM
Thanks, I plan on airbrushing any pictorials but pinstriping is what will leave a ridge/bump. Suppose I could lay a thick clear and sand smooth, then laminate.

How do you get lights under the playfield?
I'm guessing it's wood with plastic inlays but how do they get it smooth after... well layed inlays?

AskJacob
25th August 2009, 09:14 AM
The wood is routed for the plastic inserts, the inserts are then glued into the playfield from the top.

Then the whole lot is sanded flat - the inserts sit slightly high of the wood surface , and then are sanded down level to the wood.

Then artwork is applied.

If the pinstriping will create ridges, perhaps clear coating and sanding between coats could level it off :unsure

There have been some perspex/lexan playfields in the past. with reverse print on the back of the clear plastic. I reckon it would be an OK playfield surface, certainly fast playing. You would still need a timber backing to attach all the mechanical items to, as well as give the plastic some strength and prevent flex...

Cheers
Jacob