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dezbaz
15th July 2009, 11:00 PM
Hi Guys

An idea has recently come to me to share what I know

If you subscribe to this thread, each week you could get info you could use one day.

(Each Friday Night)

Things I will share are only things I think I am good at

I have been lucky enough to have been helped by some fine people on the forum, so it's time to repay the favour - (If needed)

Current Topics


# 1: Turning partical board into a mirror finish (Paint) (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=310776&postcount=10)
# 2: Wiring Tips & Neat Wiring (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=312764&postcount=24)
# 3: Electrical Safety and Tips (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=315018&postcount=36)
# 4: Cocktail Glass Clips Manufacture (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=328991&postcount=41)
# 5: Chip Free Laminated board cutting - Bench Saw (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=356276&postcount=46)
Quality Building of cabinets (Next) TBA


Possible future topics

Finishing touches
Quality building of cabinets
How to apply perfect iron on edging
Hinges technique
Applying Artwork properly
Metalwork parts manufacture for your cab
Designing your own custom cab
Alternate Feet for cabs
Strong Base
Corners for strength
Making Plastic pieces to hold your power connector
Cutting tin without the kinks
Useful Hand tools
Useful power tools
T-Molding tips
Total Cabinet Reproduction
Angled cutting of timber
Banner Printing for Marquees
Painting Laminated MDF - how?
Laminate / MDF / Partical board - Which one?





These items are how I would do it, so I understand if you don't agree :) Discussion and opinions welcome

Jump onboard if you want

I will put a weekly effort in if there is a need

I value your input, thanks to all who contribute

daics3522
16th July 2009, 12:41 AM
I am in.... Tip one...... Don't forget the handbrake when you park on a hill.......
Sorry mate had to do that.... Anyway on with the tips...........

Claude
16th July 2009, 07:16 AM
Great idea and thanks for sharing. I'm in.

Cheers,

Claudio

@lien_Zed
16th July 2009, 07:28 AM
great idea, i might learn something & im sure i can add my 2 bobs worth to help out

Dannymh
16th July 2009, 03:11 PM
count this little black duck in

Brad
16th July 2009, 03:49 PM
I've subscribed

spriggy
16th July 2009, 06:04 PM
Likewise. Always good to see other experienced peoples methods, ideas and different angles of attack. We humans have a tendancy to get caught in a rut at times <_<

Nice one.

dungbeetle46
16th July 2009, 10:58 PM
always eager to learn a thing or 2, count me in

DKong
16th July 2009, 11:27 PM
How do I subscribe to this wealth of information, will be starting a scratch built arcade cab in the future and this information will prove invaluable, great timing for me :)

dezbaz
17th July 2009, 11:08 PM
Hi
Well this is the first week. Pics will follow as I am at my daughters house and have no access to my PC

The first cab I made was a custom MAME cab, I made it from partical board.
In hindsight I should have used MDF or laminate but I had no idea at the time.
It came time to paint the beast so I prepared it like I would if repairing a car body. (I used to buy and sell cars)

The trick when painting the final colour is to stand in a position that you can get a good view / reflection back from the light IE FACE THE LIGHT. You can see all of the uneven-ness while the paint is still wet, so you can fix it.
IE face the brightest light and watch the surface being painted.
You will be amazed at the results.


Now first sand the surface with 80 Grit (I use the white sandpaper)
Mask up the areas not getting painted. Please take your time here, get it right
Coat 1: spray a primer / filler - wait an hour or so
Coat 2 and 3 : Spray a Filler (Spray putty)
wait at least overnight
Spray a primer or primer filler (Add: edit)
Sand the surface (MUST USE A Sanding block) and use 240 or 320 Grit Paper
wipe the dusty surface and look for holes / pitting
Re-coat the pitted areas and wait again for it to harden overnight

For better results sand the flat surface with 400G.

Applying the colour is next.

Prepare the environment (Shed etc) Clean all dust and crap away
If you have time maybe even wet down the floor the morning of the painting - but let it dry

Use some turps to clean the cabinet surface
Wipe the adjacent surfaces nearby with turps too.
Make sure your neighbour is not about to mow the lawns etc, and don't paint the top coat on a cold or windy day.
OK Decide whether you are using Satin or gloss (I looooove satin)
Paint the first coat lightly, don't try to cover the filler in the first coat, it needs to dry quickly to bind the paint to the filler.
Wait 30 mins or so (USE Quick drying paint NOT the 24 hour crap, too much dust sticks)
The second coat is thicker and done evenly, and overlapping
Face the light and watch it go on - same as before

When the 2nd coat dries look for dust, if there is dust it has to be sanded with 800G or 1000Grit (black sandpaper)
Paint on the final coat and you should be amazed

Some pics to follow over weekend

Bon App?tit

EDIT: (Have a look at an excellent example - Spacies cabinet paint job at post # 17 (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=311097&postcount=17))

spriggy
18th July 2009, 12:12 AM
I've only ever rolled my cabs. Still love the classic slight 'orange peel' look.
But.. now that I'm full steam again.. this will be handy if I buy a HVLP gun for the compressor. Might try a gun job on the 'Jungle Hunt' replica I'll be doing after the T&F cocktail. :cool:

Nice DB.

DKong
18th July 2009, 01:16 AM
Mod's can we have a separate list once we click on this thread, to catoragise (word inventing here) each tip so they don't get blended into one.
Ie so each tip gets it's own post

narf_
18th July 2009, 09:28 AM
one thing i found biggest dez

Dont rush it that was got me bailed up many a time
Plan a cab around the monitor also
Find a good souce of 21 inch monitors :cool:

@lien_Zed
18th July 2009, 09:36 PM
i figured this little trick out my self

i have replaced the minotr in my low boy cabinet a few times for a few reasons

anyhow the easiest way to replace the monitor is to first remove the new monitor from its plastic case

this is done by first removing it from the power source and then remove all case screws in sight and rip it to bits. who cares if you break the case along the way

next you need a big piece of card board or failing that, some paper and sticky tape and tape the paper together and use it is a template

once the monitor is removed from the plastic case put a towel on a good solid surface

i use the deep freeze in the shed for this, perfect hight and size

put the towel down and then the paper/cardboard then monitor fact down on the paper/cardboard

next, armed with your nicko pen, trace round the monitor

then gentley slide the paper out and cut out the bit that would cover the screen normally

now you have a template

put this on the new bit of wood your going to use and mark it with a pen and cut out with a drill/jigsaw

test with the monitor, you will probably find you will have to make the holes slightly bigger, but it sure is damn easy like this

mwren
18th July 2009, 11:12 PM
Definitely watching this series.

Question about removing a used monitor from it's case, in so far as I have always thought that this is a definite no-no because monitors can hold electricity even when unplugged.
Isn't there a danger of electrocution if you are not a professional?

Also, with the spraypainting, and especially a final gloss coat, best that the temperature is not too cold and/or that you get some residual warmth into article being painted for best results.

Look forward to the series,
Thanks, Michael

Savage
18th July 2009, 11:36 PM
OK some questions coming from the spray painter within.

Using primer / filler. really no need to use a separate filler after wads, can use the primer / filler again.

IT may have changed since my apprentice days, but if you do use a separate filler it was always had to be primed over the top again, ie. don't paint directly over filler. Thus using primer filler in the one product, no need for this.

Also, unless using 2 pac primer / filler. I'd let if dry for at least a week, this makes sure the solvents are out and allows for sinkage to occur. Seen plenty of paint jobs done where you can see sink back because of this in the final paint job

Also I'd sand about at least 150 or 240 grit over the 80 grit, before the primer filler, most likley find no need for 2nd application of the primer / filler.

With your painting, are you talking enamel or arcrylic?
Could be me, but I'm a bit pandentic for this. :D

spacies
19th July 2009, 06:52 AM
OK some questions coming from the spray painter within.

Using primer / filler. really no need to use a separate filler after wads, can use the primer / filler again.

IT may have changed since my apprentice days, but if you do use a separate filler it was always had to be primed over the top again, ie. don't paint directly over filler. Thus using primer filler in the one product, no need for this.

Also, unless using 2 pac primer / filler. I'd let if dry for at least a week, this makes sure the solvents are out and allows for sinkage to occur. Seen plenty of paint jobs done where you can see sink back because of this in the final paint job

Also I'd sand about at least 150 or 240 grit over the 80 grit, before the primer filler, most likley find no need for 2nd application of the primer / filler.

With your painting, are you talking enamel or arcrylic?
Could be me, but I'm a bit pandentic for this. :D

No, you are correct mate. You need waiting time for sink backs unless you are very confident in your workmanship.

I agree again. I wouldn't go near any MDF/particle board with 80grit :o and infact I don't sand it at all before the first prime. Then I do the filling and then build up from there and my final pre-top coat sand is done with 400 and then an 800 grit. Only then will I top coat if I am happy.

If using a single paint system I like to rub it down with some 1200 and then buff to get the shine rather than relying on the gun/can. 2 pot has a shine from the gun.

Here are some pics of satin paint on the Gauntlet cabinet.

http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL2001/10876724/20820869/344853785.jpg

http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL2001/10876724/20820869/344854086.jpg

Call me pedantic also, but it is the Hot Rodder in me.

stuba
19th July 2009, 05:56 PM
great thread! i know crap all about painting other than I generally get covered in it the moment i take a lid off a can. thanks for the tips. :)

spriggy
19th July 2009, 06:37 PM
Nice Spacies :cool:

@lien_Zed
19th July 2009, 07:59 PM
Definitely watching this series.

Question about removing a used monitor from it's case, in so far as I have always thought that this is a definite no-no because monitors can hold electricity even when unplugged.
Isn't there a danger of electrocution if you are not a professional?

Also, with the spraypainting, and especially a final gloss coat, best that the temperature is not too cold and/or that you get some residual warmth into article being painted for best results.

Look forward to the series,
Thanks, Michael


monitors can and do store electricity when unplugged

the screen is basically a large capacitor and that is where the majority of the electrical charge is stored

when removing the plastic case, common sense prevails. trust me, its a piece of cake to do

easiest way to do it is place the screen face down on a table with a towel on the table so you dont scratch the front of the tube

next, remove every screw in sight

next arm yourself with a large flat blade screw driver cos your going to need it as a pry bar and split the case

generally the case splits just back from the front of the tube, you will see the join easily

remove the back of the case

to get the front off, there is usally no more then 4 screws that attach the front plastic to the tube

there is absolutely no reason at all for you to touch any of the electrical circuits inside the macihne

if you go poking and proding stuff u know nothing about your asking for trouble

use your brains, dont touch the circuit boards, you have no need to any how

have i made it clear enough for all?? i hope so

dont touch any electrical circuit boards

trust me it can be done easily and safely and with out touching circuit boards

hope fully i have drummed it in to you all

if not, re-read my post untill you get the general feel of this post

dont touch any electrical circiut boards:)

mwren
19th July 2009, 11:38 PM
Thank you @_Z for clearing that up for me.
I have been looking through the forums and seen where quite a few people have removed the plastic cases before installing monitors. I see tho that that is ALL that they have done.
Just the plastic.

Mick

@lien_Zed
20th July 2009, 10:50 PM
Thank you @_Z for clearing that up for me.
I have been looking through the forums and seen where quite a few people have removed the plastic cases before installing monitors. I see tho that that is ALL that they have done.
Just the plastic.

Mick

no worries Mick, trust me mate, it aint tough

but hey look if your not confident enough to do it, just buy me a return airfare to where ever on the planet you live and i will come do it for ya!:cool:

dezbaz
24th July 2009, 10:18 PM
Week 2 How to do neat wiring in a Cab

dezbaz
24th July 2009, 11:04 PM
Things needed

clips
cable ties
connectors (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Week2-04.jpg)
wire
soldering iron
tape
heat shrink
Stickybacks (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Week2-01.jpg)

The secret of neat cabling is getting the wires to the correct length
http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages02s.jpg (http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages02.jpg)

Don't try to cut corners if the wires don't reach

In Aircraft maintenance we were told roll (ie twist) a wiring loom around a hinge rather than fold it, as the strands break in time otherwise.

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/IMG_1751sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/IMG_1751.jpg)

A nice rolling loop is better than a kink.
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/FinishedDB05Sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/FinishedDB05Sm.jpg)

Cable clips are only usable if you shorten the nails, or they will go through the side of the panel.

I DONT usually loom 240 Volt wires with Low voltage. I am referring to the 240 volt for the monitor etc.

Avoid using metal clips as it will rub through in time unless the loom has double insulation
http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages01s.jpg (http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages01.jpg)

Cable ties can be applied loosely at first to get the distances right till the basic shape is there

Joiners can be used (red inline) if needed, or just solder join and heat shrink the join. (IE: to get the exact right length)

Another easier way is to do a loop (See in the above pics)

It doesn't hurt to be a bit practical if time is scarce, most people are probably "time poor" I guess.


Next week I will go into the 240 Volt wiring neatly and safely.

I do ask that you please wait till then before discussing next weeks topic

Any questions please ask, and I am sure others will provide useful help on this topic too.

Thanks to all who replied last week

daics3522
25th July 2009, 12:01 AM
Good job D....

@lien_Zed
25th July 2009, 08:16 AM
a small tip for holding the wiring loom in place

if you go to somewhere like haymans or the likes you can buy some small square sticky backed device to attach cable ties to.
they come in a 100 pack and are about $30 per pack

the back of the device is sticky so it will hold to any surface and in the centre you can if you wish place a screw to hold it to the surface.
there is 4 small raised holes to attach zip ties too.
stick one of these do-dads to a surface and then put a zip tie from the wiring loom and attach to the do-dad and keep the wiring loom from floating free

spriggy
26th July 2009, 02:27 AM
Nice work :047:

ANT68
26th July 2009, 07:14 AM
Things needed

clips
cable ties
connectors
wire
soldering iron
tape
heat shrink

The secret of neat cabling is getting the wires to the correct length
http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages02s.jpg (http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages02.jpg)

Don't try to cut corners if the wires don't reach

In Aircraft maintenance we were told roll (IE twist) a wiring loom around a hinge rather than fold it, as the strands break in time otherwise.

A nice rolling loop is better than a kink.
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/FinishedDB05Sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/FinishedDB05Sm.jpg)

Cable clips are only usable if you shorten the nails, or they will go through the side of the panel.

I DINT usually loom 240 Volt wires with Low voltage. I am referring to the 240 volt for the monitor etc.

Avoid using metal clips as it will rub through in time unless the loom has double insulation
http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages01s.jpg (http://members.iinet.net.au/~getderrick/A-Finalstages01.jpg)

Cable ties can be applied loosely at first to get the distances right till the basic shape is there

Joiners can be used (red aniline) if needed, or just solder join and heat shrink the join. (IE: to get the exact right length)

Another easier way is to do a loop (See in the above pics)

It doesn't hurt to be a bit practical if time is scarce, most people are probably "time poor" I guess.


Next week I will go into the 240 Volt wiring neatly and safely.

I do ask that you please wait till then before discussing next weeks topic

Any questions please ask, and I am sure others will provide useful help on this topic too.

Thanks to all who replied last week

Awesome threads here dezbaz , thanks for putting in the time and the know how.
Adds a different dimension to the forum .
Keep up the good work :023:
Maybe Mods can slot these somewhere :unsure

steve2000
26th July 2009, 10:14 AM
a small tip for holding the wiring loom in place

if you go to somewhere like haymans or the likes you can buy some small square sticky backed device to attach cable ties to.
they come in a 100 pack and are about $30 per pack

the back of the device is sticky so it will hold to any surface and in the centre you can if you wish place a screw to hold it to the surface.
there is 4 small raised holes to attach zip ties too.
stick one of these do-dads to a surface and then put a zip tie from the wiring loom and attach to the do-dad and keep the wiring loom from floating free

The only problem with sticky backs is that they usually fall off over time. I would use a small screw in the middle to make sure they won't come off.

dezbaz
26th July 2009, 12:13 PM
Stickybacks here (Thanks @lien_Z for the info)
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Week2-01.jpg

It should be noted, check the length of the screws to make sure no disaster occurs by pinning through a finished laminate or painted surface

Maybe source a few different sizes and lengths of screw, and use the correct one for the purpose.

Bunnings sell 12mm x 10Guage, 12mmx 8 Guage, 16mm x 10 and 8.

The tiny guage (4 or 6G) x 10mm or 12 mm are the ones needed here, so the head of the screw doesnt get in the way of the cable ties going through

The ones below are great for attaching to 16mm panels as they are 12mm and have a needle point, so you dont need a cordless screwdriver
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Week2-03sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Week2-03.jpg)


DONT USE THESE BELOW, as they are 20mm (Measured from the flat of the head) as they will even go through 19mm panels and destoy you masterpiece
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Week2-02sm.jpg
(http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Week2-02.jpg)

There is probably a need for another discussion on this, one week . . .

@lien_Zed
26th July 2009, 07:24 PM
The only problem with sticky backs is that they usually fall off over time. I would use a small screw in the middle to make sure they won't come off.

true, and places where you cant screw the buggers in to anything, remove the sticky stuff with eucaplptus oil, buy it from woolies

then stick the pad to what ever surface you like with jb weld quick

it takes 5 mintes to stick and in situations like this, it works a treat

NiNJA
28th July 2009, 08:43 PM
A few questions .... comments.

I assume heat shrink is insulation you can shrink around exposed wires for joins etc ... or is that what connectors do ... did I miss something?

Also where do you get wire from in multiple lengths that is all multi-coloured for a cab rather than walking into a Jaycar etc and having to buy small reels of all different colours. Not trying to wire a whole new cp but have a few wires to build from kick harness into a jpac (dont want to chop wires/the connector off) and one or two ground wires to do (currently black in my cab) too.


Also I think the main thing for someone starting out from looking inside a cab is actually where you actually find all these specific parts, connectors, pins, etc ..... that is actually the hardest thing I have found. I reakon some sort of post which outlines all the different parts (wiring, connectors, pins, molex connectors, etc etc) and where you can current find them (in Aus) / what they are called / part # etc and what they are used for would be really useful if it was kept updated. Ideally people can add info to the thread and then whoever owns the thread updates the first post with the info / details .. ?

I hate having to try and explain to someone at Jaycar or dick smith (less so DS these days as its all tvs etc) what I am looking for .... sometimes photos also dont help too much.

For instance (begin shameless plug for thread) ... where do i find these molex connectors from ac rail molex plug (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=312973&postcount=26)

hope that makes sense.

dezbaz
29th July 2009, 12:01 AM
A few questions .... comments.

I assume heat shrink is insulation you can shrink around exposed wires for joins etc ... or is that what connectors do ... did I miss something?

Also where do you get wire from in multiple lengths that is all multi-coloured for a cab rather than walking into a Jaycar etc and having to buy small reels of all different colours. Not trying to wire a whole new cp but have a few wires to build from kick harness into a jpac (dont want to chop wires/the connector off) and one or two ground wires to do (currently black in my cab) too.


Also I think the main thing for someone starting out from looking inside a cab is actually where you actually find all these specific parts, connectors, pins, etc ..... that is actually the hardest thing I have found. I reakon some sort of post which outlines all the different parts (wiring, connectors, pins, molex connectors, etc etc) and where you can current find them (in Aus) / what they are called / part # etc and what they are used for would be really useful if it was kept updated. Ideally people can add info to the thread and then whoever owns the thread updates the first post with the info / details .. ?

I hate having to try and explain to someone at Jaycar or dick smith (less so DS these days as its all tvs etc) what I am looking for .... sometimes photos also dont help too much.

For instance (begin shameless plug for thread) ... where do i find these molex connectors from ac rail molex plug (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=312973&postcount=26)

hope that makes sense.

Good Point, thanks

Dick smith still sell red connectors
Heat Shrink is also available there, as is a alternative to the connectors yes.
The wire, well I use multicore wire (See that blue stuff in the pics) It has 9 different colours too. Also Trailer wire is available from bunnings or auto shops. Bunnings have it in 10 m, 20 m and 30 m lengths.

I am an electrician, so I use reticulation wire, available from total eden or retic shops.

Some molex plugs are avail at Jaycar, but I havent needed them myself for JAMMA Cabs anyway. Maybe if you have interchangable Control Panels you would need them.

I have recently tried to source specific molex plugs (to suit my Vector Monitors) and have a few good leads, and have ordered most of them from the states, most times you just get any old matching pairs and use them.

If you need the specific info (as mensioned) let me know

Clips are avail from DS or any elec wholesaler, but shorten them if using 16mm panels as the nails are long

Hope this helps.

And yes, I update the first post to add shortcuts to keep the whole thing neat and readable

Thanks for the comments ;)




For instance (begin shameless plug for thread) ... where do i find these molex connectors from ac rail molex plug (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showpost.php?p=312973&postcount=26)

.

Bob roberts

http://homearcade.org/BBBB/molexcons.jpg

http://homearcade.org/BBBB/conectas.html

GIBO
29th July 2009, 12:16 AM
Jaycar sell some molex connectors and the extractor tools
http://www.jaycar.com.au/productResults.asp?whichpage=1&pagesize=10&keywords=molex&form=KEYWORD
also GPE in the US sell them as well and the better extraction tools and crimpers
http://www.greatplainselectronics.com/connector_categories.asp

narf_
29th July 2009, 08:07 PM
one good trick

never throw out old plugs too. i recycled a heap of a cab to rebuild my SF2 cabinet

plus its handy to have those odd shaped arcade ones spare.

i might have some power box ones ill have a dig when im at the wifes place. i got a big box of wire that never is always handy as most of it is pinned

dezbaz
1st August 2009, 07:36 PM
Week 3:

Firstly, you never get electrical advice, because it encourages you to do things you would not have done.

That puts you in danger.

SO . . This thread is NOT here to instruct you or encourage you to do things with electrical wires, or plugs.

I do suggest you see an electrician to do your 240 Volt side of your cabinet.

Having said all of that I now say this.

I have a few tricks and tips to make your cabinet safer (Info is Mainly for those who are experienced with this but didn't realise these things)

1. UNPLUG THE POWER CORD, UNPLUG THE POWER CORD, THEN UNPLUG THE POWER CORD

2. Cover ALL Active and Neutral solder joins. (Heatshrink maybe) - Select the correct size, remembering it shrinks down to 1/2 it's diameter. The size of heatshrink is it's largest Diameter.

3. Locations needing covering include The mains terminals on the power supply, the inlet plug / socket, the transformer terminals. and the fuse area on your chassis (even the 110V has to be covered as it would bite bad if touched.)

4. Another way to successfully cover High Voltage is with a barrier.
I have used a junction box lid as below

http://updates.clipsal.com/ClipsalOnline/Images/Full/01/A0824.jpg

I prefer covering things up with polycarbonate clear sheet.
IE
http://www.indiabizclub.com/uploads05/54/0/Untitled-219096752.jpg

I bought 1 m? of the sheet from bunnings for about 26 bucks a few years ago and still have heaps left for my cabs.

It can easily cut with tinsnips as it is only 1mm thick. Cut it and bend it 90 degrees in any shape and screw it to your panels using a cordless drill and the needle point screws shown above. Takes no time to make them up and they look great.

This is a typical shape that you may need
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/cover1.jpg

Another trick is to use a screw on socket to cover the entry point for the kettle cord

IE

http://updates.clipsal.com/ClipsalOnline/Images/Full/01/B0551.jpg OR http://updates.clipsal.com/ClipsalOnline/Images/Full/01/A4522.jpg

It depends how big the socket is.

5. Sometimes a bit of plastic siliconed to a few points nearby will suffice in covering the hard to cover areas such as the fuse in the chassis

6. Avoid joining live cables together midway along, IE NO Floating connections, they look untidy and are not safe. Take the 240V and 110V wires back to the point where the wire originates, ie solder it to another terminal, or to a screw.

7. If you are not sure of something, please ask, DON'T GUESS, OR DON'T DO IT if unsure.

8. You only get one chance, so ask the experts, and get it right and enjoy a safe machine.

9. and did I say

UNPLUG THE CORD BEFORE DOING ANYTHING IN YOUR CABINET

spriggy
2nd August 2009, 12:14 AM
Yes Sir :025:

Nice m8

DKong
2nd August 2009, 02:09 AM
week 3:


1. Unplug the power cord, unplug the power cord, then unplug the power cord



unplug the cord before doing anything in your cabinet

+2 or is that + 6 <serious face>

dezbaz
14th August 2009, 08:33 PM
Templates

I have had to make a few templates.

It cuts down time by at lease 90% each time you have to make a panel again

I will show all of my templates and how they are used, so it gives you ideas to apply to your cabinet making

This weekly tip could take a few weeks as there are lots of different ideas to cover, and there probably will be a lot of discussion on the subject.

Stand by . . . . . . . :)

narf_
14th August 2009, 11:37 PM
1 tip i found

the 25 inch cabinets by lai that look like a slightly smaller turtles rig with the "v" front shaped control panels are a pain if you need a new tube.

easiest thing i just found is to remove the glass holders either side and undo the screws to the monitor mount and lift the mount out (its nailed also).

you can replace this with a 26 inch mount with no hassles. Only problem i have encounted is you must lower the chassis about 2 inches to allow room for the tube :cool:

gives hope to fixing these cabs.

dezbaz
20th September 2009, 10:13 PM
Hi All
Sorry for the delay here

Next step
Making clips to hold the glass down on a cocktail cab
each cab needs 8, so I am making 2 sets

Size of top 16mm
Size of Glass 6mm

Size of clips (Inside dimension) = 22mm

Here's what I did

Get a length of 50 x 25mm rectangular tubing (Click to enlarge)
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips30sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips30.jpg)

Mark the 16 lines on the tubing (I just used a 19mm square pine to quickly draw the lines)

Use a 1mm thick blade in the grinder

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips25sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips25.jpg)

Cut the long cut first then cut the 16 cuts almost all the way through


http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips28sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips28.jpg)


http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips26sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips26.jpg)

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips29sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips29.jpg)

Turn the tube over and cut them through (Line up the cuts carefully, or you'll have to grind a lot off later)

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips22sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips22.jpg)

Clean up all edges and round the 4 x 90 degree corners


http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips24sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips24.jpg)

NOW . . . the inside diameter is wrong, needs to be 22mm. The tubing is 21mm

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips19sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips19.jpg)

This is how I enlarged the gap.
I had a square hammer - like a panelbeaters hammer, and an old broken Axe too.


http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips14sm.jpg (Clean up all edges and round the 4 x 90 degree corners

This is how I enlarged the gap. I had a square hammer - like a panelbeaters hammer, and an old broken Axe too.

[URL="http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips14.jpg)

Force the axe handle into the 2 legs and bash it into an anvil or similar (Vice) to spread it open

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips18sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips18.jpg)

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips17sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips17.jpg)

daics3522
20th September 2009, 10:36 PM
I just saw these in the flesh and they looked awesome. Even considering I bumped the board after the first top coat was done and knocked a couple over they still looked fanfarkintastic.

dezbaz
20th September 2009, 10:46 PM
Force the opened legs into the vice (With soft jaws)

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips15sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips15.jpg)

Bash the square hammer into the flat to get rid of the curve

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips13sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips13.jpg)

Straighten the legs with pliers

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips11sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips11.jpg)

I bashed the clip into the bench while the pliers were 90 degrees to the bench

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips08sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips08.jpg)

Drill the holes (remember to avoid the T-molding, so drill about 10mm from the longest leg's end) try and drill in the centre (OOPS) LOL

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips07sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips07.jpg)

Getting ready to paint, NOTE: As it is metal, I used etch primer

Paint the first coat lightly and let it dry, that makes the paint stick better

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips05sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips05.jpg)

Turn them over and etch prime the other side and when dry give a covering coat one side, then later, the other side.


Below is the Satin Black coat
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips06sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips06.jpg)

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips02sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips02.jpg)

Do they fit?


http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips12sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/Clips12.jpg)

Ahhh I already tried that, and made fine adjustments before painting

That's it!

Any questions?

dezbaz
21st September 2009, 02:16 PM
Final Result . . .
http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/IMG_1742sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/IMG_1742.jpg)

http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/IMG_1747sm.jpg (http://www.dsbelec.iinet.net.au/IMG_1747.jpg)

Davefjedi
21st September 2009, 02:28 PM
nice one

dezbaz
19th December 2009, 12:38 AM
Just learnt something new which will save me heaps of time and routing

I was cutting laminated particle board on my bench saw, and noticed it was a nice clean edge.

Normally there would be chips galore

So I measured the distance the fence is from the blade at the leading tooth and at the trailing tooth.

The leading tooth to fence was 300mm and trailing tooth was 300.5mm

Then I thought about it

The leading teeth push down on the material, and the trailing teeth push up.
So I guess the closer teeth smooth over the chips as they go, and the trailing teeth are not even in contact except for the excess waste material.

Moral of the story

Set the distance 0.5mm closer at the first teeth to contact the material for a clean cut

Tim
11th January 2010, 06:10 PM
great work!

dezbaz
11th January 2010, 09:21 PM
great work!

Thank you :)

DKong
11th January 2010, 09:26 PM
Some how missed this part of the thread!

Dez Backyard master!

Good stuff love your work did you get the t-moulding I sent you and was it right :unsure

dezbaz
11th January 2010, 09:28 PM
Some how missed this part of the thread!

Dez Backyard master!

Good stuff love your work did you get the t-moulding I sent you and was it right :unsure

Thanks Ben
Yes the T-Mold Arrived today, and is the correct one, thank you heaps :cool::cool::cool::cool::cool:

IMPURE
25th January 2010, 10:50 PM
Cmon Dez im waiting for more tips :)

dezbaz
25th January 2010, 10:51 PM
Cmon Dez im waiting for more tips :)

Ok, will do

I was waiting for a request, so you got it :rolleyes

I will put something together soon regarding building quality cabs, which might be helpful

:D

@lien_Zed
26th January 2010, 07:40 AM
Cmon Dez im waiting for more tips :)

ill give ya a tip

work hard, and be good to ya mother :p:p

regards

Dez

IMPURE
26th January 2010, 09:01 AM
hehehehe

dezbaz
20th February 2010, 01:05 AM
Ok

Here's my take on this, please feel free to add things I miss - No probs

So far I have built a MAME cab, which was my own design, refurbished another MAME, built a reduced size Pacman upright and built 2 MS Pacman cocktails. I am not yet finished a Lunar Lander Cab

I will go over things which you have to get right, and some things that don't matter so much.

Now the post is how to build quality cabs, so don't expect to knock one out in a weekend until you have made a dozen and are starting to get experience :D Even then most blokes will tell you it takes ages to build a cab, even longer to build it properly.

1. Things that matter (Must be right)

The base must have right angle corners, all other panels come from this so get it right
On my first MS pacman cocktail cab, me and Daics put it together and found my T square was actually about 89 degrees, not 90. The base was therefore incorrect and everything else followed, there was a twist in every step, small shaves had to be taken off here and there to compensate. Lost lots of time.
The 2 sides must be identical to each other.
All fixed front, rear and top panels must be the same width as each other
The LHS monitor brackets need to be the same angle and distance as the RHS equivalent, as do all 19 x 19mm corner braces. I use 19 x 19 as it can be glued, and screwed, and it can be clamped prior to screwing, to make sure it doesn't move until dry, and it is in the right spot. Some people use the perforated angle brackets bunnings sell. They are fine provided you use lots of needle point 12mm screws.


2. Things that don't matter so much

No doubt opinions may differ here - that's fine.
Examples - people wont notice these things probably
Gaps can be filled if you make a mistake, car bog is great for this, some people use PVA Glue and sawdust to fill gaps.
On my pacman upright, the top was put on square, but the panel under the marquee was 2mm lower on the left - OOPS. But no one ever noticed, I just cut the marquee perspex to suit. LOL :redface
I have used wood putty, even plaster depending where it is. Wood putty, and car bog may show under artwork after a year or two so be aware where it's going
Usually if it is pleasing to the eye it will be fine, but for best results use a 90 degree T Square prior to screwing in the screws


More soon including pics

Please add your 2c :)

narf_
20th February 2010, 01:11 AM
dont rush things
more supports the merrier
every cab needs a big flight yoke :lol
factor in for people with larger hands with regards to button spacing and joystick positions

Taverner
20th February 2010, 01:41 AM
I got caught out with the square myself so I'll add be careful changing tools mid build :lol I had cut most of the cab out, made the pine stand etc, then my brother told me I could have his tools that he no longer used. I grabbed the square and started to check things over and everything seemed way out of whack, I was going nuts cause I had been really taking my time until I realised it was the square that wasn't square (2 parts and had shifted).

@lien_Zed
20th February 2010, 06:43 AM
some kind of locking device on the inside of the door so your toddlers cant open the door and start ripping out wiring is highly recommended:cool:

Maz
23rd January 2011, 08:35 PM
Thanks for the effort you put into your guides Dez - I noticed you joined the OCAU forums recently too.

Could I respectfully request the following guides:
Designing your own custom cab
Hinges technique
Alternate Feet for cabs

Cheers!

---------- Post added at 09:35 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:32 PM ----------

...and Angled cutting of timber would also be great!

:)

dezbaz
23rd January 2011, 09:04 PM
Thanks for the effort you put into your guides Dez - I noticed you joined the OCAU forums recently too.

Could I respectfully request the following guides:
Designing your own custom cab
Hinges technique
Alternate Feet for cabs

Cheers!

---------- Post added at 09:35 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:32 PM ----------

...and Angled cutting of timber would also be great!

:)

Hi Maz :)

Sure, no probs :)

Any preference which one first mate?

Hewitson
25th January 2011, 01:04 PM
some kind of locking device on the inside of the door so your toddlers cant open the door and start ripping out wiring is highly recommended:cool:
:lol

After the amount of time and work I have put in to rewiring my cab I can't imagine what I'd do if that happened. The kid would regret it, thats for sure.

Maz
25th January 2011, 05:22 PM
Hi Maz :)

Sure, no probs :)

Any preference which one first mate?


All of them?!? :laugh:

I'm probably going to need the Angled cutting of timber first (I'm planning a Surface Tension rip off made out of Eucalypt).

Followed by Hinges technique.

Cheers!!

TheWiggman
28th September 2011, 02:39 PM
Regarding the cutting a base or angle square, it is possible to use an out-of-square square to get a perfect angle. This only works with a square that can be flipped over. Many T-squares are no good for this reason.

1. Draw your line using the set square.
2. Flip the square over.
3. On the same face and edge, draw another line starting from the same point where you draw the first one.

If your two lines are not perfectly true with one another you'll have ended up with two unparallel lines stemming from a point, like a very long isosceles triangle with a very short base.

4. Where this 'triangle's base' should be, disect the line
5. Draw a line from the point where the lines meet to the point of the disected 'triangle'.

Voila! If you did it carefully, you'll have a perfect 90? corner. This relies on a very straight edge to start with though so be sure of this first. Whenever I'm doing panel work I always make sure I have one corner perfecly square on a sheet and make all cuts and lines referencing these two edges. To identify this corner I draw a little square on it denoting it's a right angle. Provided your panel saw is square, you can be confident all other cuts will be square after this.

The above technique also works for spirit levels that are out of square.

TurismoMaloo
28th February 2012, 09:31 PM
I must be Mr tight ass dodgy lol ;) I cut some 45's using off cuts my sliding mitre saw when setting the frame, and measure the alternate corners for square !! does the job well :D

andykmv
22nd July 2012, 08:48 AM
hey dez, looks like there's 25 weeks worth of tips to fill in here! cmon, get to it!:D

dezbaz
22nd July 2012, 09:58 AM
hey dez, looks like there's 25 weeks worth of tips to fill in here! cmon, get to it!:D

At the moment I can share how to build a kitchen. Even how not to actually. :D

andykmv
22nd July 2012, 10:45 AM
what, no sideart on the kitchen cabinets ?
no pcb/lcd upgrades for the fridgecade ?
what about the microwave benchtop with added joystick ?
give me something , anything, please! :cry

- - - Updated - - -

corr! that gives me a great idea for the ultimate kitchen!
forget the wall mount oven with integrated grill, make it a 24" 4:3 lcd screen behin=d the oven door glass, with a drop down CP attached to the grill door!