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View Full Version : Hi guys i need some advice on M.A.M.E. please



SirValiant
21st June 2006, 12:22 PM
Hi guys, i am at a stage where i am about to sell my 20 inch upright with jamma boards to start a mame project from scratch but am looking for some advice before i try it. The reason for it is because i want to build my own arcade machine from the start with my own designs and control panel so i can have every game i have ever wanted.

The question is, is mame the same as a jamma board? Are they the same graphics? If i were to put a dedicated machine next to a mame unit for say TMNT would there be significant differences? i want to have all the games of the past but i want the look and feel to be the same too. Is it possible or is it just a pipedream. Thanks

TheYellowDart
21st June 2006, 01:02 PM
First of all, please don't cross post in different forums, it's better to keep it in a single thread.

The emulation accuracy of MAME for most games is very good. If a game is listed as "working" then as long as the computer driving it is powerful enough they'd be pretty close to identical. It has been said that there can be a slight timing issue where if you run the two machines side by side and don't touch them for a few days they'd become slightly out of sync but I've never seen any evidence to support this.

SirValiant
21st June 2006, 01:10 PM
Thank you and apologies for the cross post. Very new to this board. I have just seen so many options and opinions about the best set up im trying to get as much varied advice as possible. I love the idea of dedicated machines or just keeping the jamma boards but this presents a very expensive option when wanting to get all the old games i like. Just thought mame may be the way to go.

Berty
21st June 2006, 01:45 PM
I really dont like "mame" cabs simply because people try and cram as much random sh!t on a control panel as possible.

Mame is fairly accurate, but the sound from mame is rubbish in most cases. So long as you are displaying your games in the correct resolution, then it should look okay -but im a big fan of scan lines so no 640x480 for me with old games.

You should just keep your upright, make a few interchangeable panels for it (it may already be wired to hankin universal system) that way you can run mame plus your original boards.

Ric
21st June 2006, 01:56 PM
I agree with berty

Nothing better than going original.

I have two cabs (MK1 dedicated and 4p gottlieb generic) and am looking for a third (for older vertical res games i have) and find them to be the best option.

Gameboards can be expensive but their are bargains to be had if you keep your eyes peeled and are patient. It really depends what you want?

I tried the MAME option on my Gottlieb and just got fed up with it. Could never get the picture right. Could have been a lot of things but I preferred to play the games I have rather than muck around with MAME.

Ric

feeras
21st June 2006, 02:12 PM
Hi,

I have a mame cabinet and I'm certainly guilty of putting everything out there emulatable on it. You are really spoiled for games having such a cabinet. For the average joe, a mame cabinet is good enough -- and you save so much. Besides, arcade cabinets aint the smallest things in the world.

One thing I'd recommend though is an arcade monitor. Games looks much better on an arcade monitor.

Cheers,

Smit
21st June 2006, 02:33 PM
Hi Sir Valiant,

I know alot of people are gonna disagree with me, but here it goes:

I LOVE mame... I never really grew up around the arcades due to living in a small town with limited games available (and money was short also). I can tell you that if it wern't for me seeing a small article in some PC mag about people putting PCs inside old cabinents (running mame), there is no way I would be here now posting this (or playing in the MGL, which is really good fun)... I personally think that alot of people don't give MAME enough credit in regards to the increasing interest in retro arcade cabs... Thats just my opinion though.

I picked up 3 old shells of a cabinents (I think it's an old LAI or something) for $10 each, no monitor or game boards... just the empty cabs with buttons and joysticks. I then added a 21" CRT monitor, I-Pac, old PC (1.4GHZ Celeron or something), speakers and a few other bits. Now, after alot of stuffing around with frontend software settings, I have a good (i wouldn't say perfect) working arcade cab under my house with all the games I could ever play!! In total I think it cost me less then $100 in total for one cab!! You would be flat out buying a decent single PCB for that amount...

Don't get me wrong, I would not go and MAME an original cabinet or convert a working machine or anything like that (i do have some respect for the classics), but for people on a limited budget and/ or resources, I personally think MAME is a great choice...

My 2 cents,

Smit

SirValiant
21st June 2006, 03:26 PM
Thanks guys i really appreciate the advice. Any more advice please feel free to keep posting. i guess for me i want to go a bit exteme. 4 players control panel with 6 buttons per controller on a 25-26" display. The Ultimate seems like good plans to start building that. was also going to go a Nanao monitor if i can chase one down somewhere cheap enough. I guess at present its a regretful sale as i need the money for other things also.

Admittedly i would love a dedicated MK Cab and a dedicated either NBA JAM or TMNT and in the future ill chase them down, but more for the social aspect when friends come over for parties etc id love to have the mame setup happening. Problem is i may have to go a 68cm TV at first just due to budget which i think will suck. Any opinions here??

Berty
21st June 2006, 03:44 PM
Nanao's are hard to come buy by themselves, i was looking for a little while back and about the only new monitors you can get here in aus are those crappy wei-ya's.

elvis
21st June 2006, 03:45 PM
The question is, is mame the same as a jamma board?
First of all, the responses so far have been great. All the pros and cons of MAME have been covered well, and as you can see different people care about different ideals when building that perfect home arcade machine.

A background on MAME: MAME strives for accuracy above everything else. Other emulators will sacrifice accuracy for speed. This might be as menial as speeding a game up from 59.1 Hz refresh to 60Hz fresh to stop tearing on a VGA monitor (eg: Kawaks), right through to completely re-writing the rendering scheme to speed things up (eg: ZiNc).

MAME is a central core with a series of drivers to control the emulation of various CPUs. These interact together to emulate game boards. The "accuracy of MAME" is not a black and white figure, and varies game to game, board to board. Generally speaking, it can be said that MAME's accuracy is better than other emulators (as mentioned above). With the right setup, you could easily get "arcade perfection" (see my audio caveat later on) with 50% of MAME titles. Bump that up to 75% if you don't mind very minor and often unnoticable-to-the-human-eye issues.

Some people care about accuracy and some don't. Some just want the game to be in a fairly playable state even on old hardware, and some want it as close as possible to the original hardware, even if that means shelling out for a 3.5GHz processor just to play a 15+ year old game.

You monitor plays a big part with MAME. My first MAME cab ran a 21" VGA monitor. To use it I scaled the emulated games to 31KHz+ resolutions using software. The end result was an image that looked "too sharp", and the scaling really showed off the blocky graphics. The games were certainly playable, but they didn't look authentic to anyone who has hung around arcades for a long time. (Casual gamers never noticed, I should add). It's like watching a low-def movie on a CRT TV, and then watching that same low-def movie scaled/stretched up on a PC monitor. You notice quickly all the imperfections that were hidden by the low resolution television.

So I've started converting a cab with a proper 26" arcade monitor (just a generic LAI cab off eBay - please o please don't MAME an original dedicated cab EVER), and the difference is amazing. For starters, I'm running AdvanceMAME which allows me to program my PC video hardware to spit out real arcade resolutions. This means no more scaling or post-processing, but actual ~15KHz arcade resolutions (and matching refresh rates) coming out native. Games run at identical speeds to their real arcade hardware counterparts (assuming the drivers are complete and working, which is the case for almost all the games I enjoy). Video wise, for a great deal of games they look arcade perfect. Again, some aren't (and never will be, due to the difficulty in emulating them). But many are - particularly the older stuff.

As Berty mentioned, audio is a tough one. For some arcade systems there was a fair bit of analogue hardware sitting between the board's sound processor and the human ear. This sort of stuff is notoriously difficult to emulate/simulate, and MAME games never sound quite the same as their real arcade counterparts. Again, you need to weight up if this matters or not. For me, I almost prefer MAME audio for some games. I can use higher quality speakers and equalisers (either hardware or software) to tweak the sound to my liking. Purists won't enjoy this, and I can understand that. Whether something sounded nice or crap on the original hardware doesn't matter - sometimes the original imperfections are what we strive for.

At the end of the day it all boils down to personal preference. For me, I have a mortgage, missus, kids and a dog. Arcade collecting comes a long way down the list of stuff to spend my dollars on. MAME is a nice cheap alternative to what can easily be an expensive hobby. Likewise, I don't have room for 10 dedicated cabs. 1 MAME cab with a few hundred "8-way stick and 6 button" playable games starts to look awful attractive in that respect.

If I had a nice humidity controlled ex-airport-hanger and a few million bucks spare, I'd start collecting dedicated machines right now. For me now, my personal collection of PCBs is limited to less than a half-dozen boards, and a single JAMMA cab running MAME. For me, that's "good enough". You need to decide for yourself what "good enough" is.

SirValiant
21st June 2006, 04:43 PM
ELVIS, thanks so much awesome reply and giving me lots to think about. My current preference is to eventually have a few dedicated cabs as i previously mentioned. At this stage i love the idea of finding an exisiting 26" cab with a nanao monitor (if possible) and converting that to mame. Graphics wise i want it to be as close as possible.

As far as sound goes, i would like it to be as close as i can get it. But the idea of new speakers pumping out a bit more sound is also attractive. Thanks so much to everyone the advice is very much appreciated

humpalot
21st June 2006, 05:50 PM
I agree a 26" is the way to go. For me it makes playing the vertical games on a horizontal monitor bearable. A 20" M.A.ME. cabinet just doesn't cut it unless it only plays the correct monitor orientation games, or if you enjoy playing games on something like a 14" screen.

WOKA
21st June 2006, 10:39 PM
Can someone gloss over how to run an arcade monitor in a mame cabinet..? How do you connect it all up.. Say for example I have a old PC stacked into an old cabinet running through a JPAC and into a computer monitor. How do I convert to get the video signal to an arcade monitor instead..?

Some have preiously suggested using an old TV, again my problem is how to connect up the chassis of the old TV to the PC..? Or am I totally missing the point.

Another angle: Could I use an appropriate video card with S-Video out and put an S-Video cable from the video card to the S-Video in on a TVr..?

How can I acheive that magic 15Khz ..?


W.

elvis
22nd June 2006, 10:06 AM
Can someone gloss over how to run an arcade monitor in a mame cabinet..? How do you connect it all up.. Say for example I have a old PC stacked into an old cabinet running through a JPAC and into a computer monitor. How do I convert to get the video signal to an arcade monitor instead..?

Some have preiously suggested using an old TV, again my problem is how to connect up the chassis of the old TV to the PC..? Or am I totally missing the point.

Another angle: Could I use an appropriate video card with S-Video out and put an S-Video cable from the video card to the S-Video in on a TVr..?

How can I acheive that magic 15Khz ..?


W.
(Before I start - no those ex-gov machines haven't arrived yet, and yes I'm pissed too because they were promised well over 2 weeks ago!)

Some background:

PC monitors of the modern age require 31KHz or greater input. Why 31KHz? Well, I have roughly 480 lines of information (remember CRT monitors don't really care too much about horizontal resolution - the number of lines drawn vertically matters more). I need another 40-odd lines for blanking and whatnot (giving me around 520 or so lines), and this all needs to be drawn 60 times every second. 60*520-ish gives me the magic 31000-ish.

Arcade monitors and standard low-def CRT TVs are half the lines, and thus half the frequency (15KHz).

One thing to note: interlacing is a way of getting a higher resolution to the screen. At 15KHz (half the frequency) I can send 240 or so lines to the screen (half the res), 60 times per second. We'll call this "240p" mode (ie: 240 lines drawn progressively). With the same hardware I can draw 480 lines in 2 passes at half the refresh. On pass one, I draw every odd line of my 480-line image, and on pass two I draw every even line. So now I can send images to the screen that are 480 lines tall, albeit at an equivalent rate of 30 times per second (the framerate is halved as I need to do everything twice). We'll call this 480i (480 lines drawn interlaced).

480i is common in TV modes. It allows for higher detailed information (eg: DVD quality movies) to be displayed to a low resolution device. It also elliminates scanlines. When you display information in 240p, you get the black lines between each coloured line of information. With 480i, these aren't as noticable to the human eye, as the passes of odd and even lines fill these up. Take a photo of a TV with an extremely high shutter speed camera, and you'll probably see it however (assuming the phosphor glow doesn't compensate).

480i however is bad for games. With information that doesn't need to be sharp (eg: movies with no static text), it's not a drama. But anything with small static text that must be read, or information (life bars, gaming info, etc) appear very "flickery" to the human eye. Also, games running at 30FPS are noticably jerky to your brain and it's hand/eye feedback than a 60FPS game.

For more info on monitors and modelines, read this:
http://easymamecab.mameworld.net/html/monitor1.htm

Soooo.... with that done, lets move on:

240p 15KHz modes (and note that MAME uses all sorts of modes from 220-odd through to 280-odd, not just exactly 240-line modes) are what you want for MAME. For starters, they are easier on the eye. Secondly, they are what the original titles ran at (up until 3D hardware, where interlaced modes became popular - but lets ignore that for now).

How do you get these modes out of MAME?

1) The easy yet expensive way: The ArcadeVGA + Windows + MAME

look at it here:
http://www.ultimarc.com/avgainf.html

Buy it here:
http://www.ozstick.com.au/prod_interface.html

The ArcadeVGA is essentially an ATi Radeon card that has been modified at a BIOS level to output 15KHz modes. To get this working, do the following:

1) Install the card into your machine
2) Install the drivers
3) Fire up MAME.

Easy as that. MAME will scan the available resolutions on your system and choose the one closest to the native res of the game you are playing. The ArcadeVGA drivers insert the correct modelines into the system registry, and MAME will grab the closest mode and use it.

The ArcadeVGA will also do 480i output, which is nice if you need to display a Windows desktop at 640x480 on an arcade monitor. I believe it can also do "pan" modes, where it only displays a 320x240 window of any resolution you like that you can then pan around. However, for most MAME cab owners, you'd be running a frontend anyway (say like MAMEWah (http://mamewah.mameworld.net/) or similar).

Folks wanting to connect the ArcadeVGA to an arcade monitor that doesn't take a DSUB15 "VGA" plug will either need the Ultimarc Video Amp (ups the output voltage from PC's 1-2V to arcade's 5-7V, and combines H+V sync) or a JPAC (JPAC = iPAC + JAMMA fingerboard + video amp). Or, if your monitor takes low voltage input, simply wire up the R, G and B lines, and twist your H+V sync together and connect it to composite sync. The Ultimarc Video Amp (available at OzStick) is easier of course, and most likely necessary for most folks with older monitors.

2) The difficult yet inexpensive way: manual modeline hacking
This is not for the faint of heart. For starters, sending the wrong modes to your monitor can damage it (depending on the make and model). Secondly, it requires much ****ing around with very geeky stuff. This is NOT a "plug and play" solution.

Of the manual modeline hacking, there are two common methods:

2a) Windows + Powerstrip:
http://entechtaiwan.net/util/ps.shtm

PowerStrip is a utility that will allow you to create custom video modes. This is a bloody fantastic tool, and highly recommended for home theatre PC folks too (need to make yourself a real native 16:9 720p mode? PS can do it too). With this tool you can do manually what the ArcadeVGA drivers do automatically.

The BYOAC forums have a nice thread on PowerStrip here:
http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php?topic=43728.0

They talk about 480i modes, but again I recommend 240p modes.

Some cards can do 240p modes, and some can't. Generally speaking most Nvidia and ATi plug-in cards past and present seem to work fine (a lot of people use the good old ATi Rage card from way back). Intel and SiS onboard graphics seem to have poor results.

2b) Linux + AdvanceMAME (aka: elvis' favourite way)
http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/

AdvanceMAME allows realtime on-the-fly generation of modelines under Linux. Using video output libraries such as SVGALib (my personal favourite - userland utilities and a loadable kernel module) and Linux's FBDev (needs to be compiled into the kernel) you can define the maximum and minimum modes your monitor supports, and AdvanceMAME will generate the necessary modeline within those boundaries.

The same caveats apply here as they do with the PowerStrip guide:
1) This is difficult for folks who don't know Linux very well
2) This could be dangerous for your monitor if you make a mistake
3) Some video cards can't support this, see the list of supported cards here:
http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/doc-cardlinx.html

A good introduction to doing this is here:
http://easymamecab.mameworld.net/html/linux.htm

3) The cheap yet ugly way: TV-out
TV-out is a standard feature on most video cards these days. And most video cards that use TV-out use the superior S-Video. S-Video is far superior in picture quality to the yellow-plug composite system.

Plus, 21" (52cm) TVs can be head for peanuts. Most places will sell them for under $150. I saw a special on at "the good guys" just this week for 52cm TVs with S-Video input for $99.

The con of course is that S-Video is the dreaded 480i mode. Even if you select any other resolution (including 320x240), your video card will scale it and spit it out at 480i. Very stupid, if you ask me.

For best results, hard-set your desktop and MAME to 640x480 (use D3D without bilinear filtering instead of DDraw to avoid software filtering on an already blurry image).

480i and S-Video is notoriously blurry and flickery. Direct RGB with 240p modes looks a hundred times better, but there is of course cost and effort involved. TV-out is definitely the "no brainer" alternative to screwing around with arcade monitors, but the end result is definitely not as authentic.

That's a lot of info there. I'll stop it here I think.

Berty
22nd June 2006, 03:22 PM
I have used TV out before and it is total ass.

LOTR4U
22nd June 2006, 09:35 PM
(Before I start - no those ex-gov machines haven't arrived yet, and yes I'm pissed too because they were promised well over 2 weeks ago!)

Some background:

PC monitors of the modern age require 31KHz or greater input. Why 31KHz? Well, I have roughly 480 lines of information (remember CRT monitors don't really care too much about horizontal resolution - the number of lines drawn vertically matters more). I need another 40-odd lines for blanking and whatnot (giving me around 520 or so lines), and this all needs to be drawn 60 times every second. 60*520-ish gives me the magic 31000-ish.

Arcade monitors and standard low-def CRT TVs are half the lines, and thus half the frequency (15KHz).

One thing to note: interlacing is a way of getting a higher resolution to the screen. At 15KHz (half the frequency) I can send 240 or so lines to the screen (half the res), 60 times per second. We'll call this "240p" mode (ie: 240 lines drawn progressively). With the same hardware I can draw 480 lines in 2 passes at half the refresh. On pass one, I draw every odd line of my 480-line image, and on pass two I draw every even line. So now I can send images to the screen that are 480 lines tall, albeit at an equivalent rate of 30 times per second (the framerate is halved as I need to do everything twice). We'll call this 480i (480 lines drawn interlaced).

480i is common in TV modes. It allows for higher detailed information (eg: DVD quality movies) to be displayed to a low resolution device. It also elliminates scanlines. When you display information in 240p, you get the black lines between each coloured line of information. With 480i, these aren't as noticable to the human eye, as the passes of odd and even lines fill these up. Take a photo of a TV with an extremely high shutter speed camera, and you'll probably see it however (assuming the phosphor glow doesn't compensate).

480i however is bad for games. With information that doesn't need to be sharp (eg: movies with no static text), it's not a drama. But anything with small static text that must be read, or information (life bars, gaming info, etc) appear very "flickery" to the human eye. Also, games running at 30FPS are noticably jerky to your brain and it's hand/eye feedback than a 60FPS game.

For more info on monitors and modelines, read this:
http://easymamecab.mameworld.net/html/monitor1.htm

Soooo.... with that done, lets move on:

240p 15KHz modes (and note that MAME uses all sorts of modes from 220-odd through to 280-odd, not just exactly 240-line modes) are what you want for MAME. For starters, they are easier on the eye. Secondly, they are what the original titles ran at (up until 3D hardware, where interlaced modes became popular - but lets ignore that for now).

How do you get these modes out of MAME?

1) The easy yet expensive way: The ArcadeVGA + Windows + MAME

look at it here:
http://www.ultimarc.com/avgainf.html

Buy it here:
http://www.ozstick.com.au/prod_interface.html

The ArcadeVGA is essentially an ATi Radeon card that has been modified at a BIOS level to output 15KHz modes. To get this working, do the following:

1) Install the card into your machine
2) Install the drivers
3) Fire up MAME.

Easy as that. MAME will scan the available resolutions on your system and choose the one closest to the native res of the game you are playing. The ArcadeVGA drivers insert the correct modelines into the system registry, and MAME will grab the closest mode and use it.

The ArcadeVGA will also do 480i output, which is nice if you need to display a Windows desktop at 640x480 on an arcade monitor. I believe it can also do "pan" modes, where it only displays a 320x240 window of any resolution you like that you can then pan around. However, for most MAME cab owners, you'd be running a frontend anyway (say like MAMEWah (http://mamewah.mameworld.net/) or similar).

Folks wanting to connect the ArcadeVGA to an arcade monitor that doesn't take a DSUB15 "VGA" plug will either need the Ultimarc Video Amp (ups the output voltage from PC's 1-2V to arcade's 5-7V, and combines H+V sync) or a JPAC (JPAC = iPAC + JAMMA fingerboard + video amp). Or, if your monitor takes low voltage input, simply wire up the R, G and B lines, and twist your H+V sync together and connect it to composite sync. The Ultimarc Video Amp (available at OzStick) is easier of course, and most likely necessary for most folks with older monitors.

2) The difficult yet inexpensive way: manual modeline hacking
This is not for the faint of heart. For starters, sending the wrong modes to your monitor can damage it (depending on the make and model). Secondly, it requires much ****ing around with very geeky stuff. This is NOT a "plug and play" solution.

Of the manual modeline hacking, there are two common methods:

2a) Windows + Powerstrip:
http://entechtaiwan.net/util/ps.shtm

PowerStrip is a utility that will allow you to create custom video modes. This is a bloody fantastic tool, and highly recommended for home theatre PC folks too (need to make yourself a real native 16:9 720p mode? PS can do it too). With this tool you can do manually what the ArcadeVGA drivers do automatically.

The BYOAC forums have a nice thread on PowerStrip here:
http://forum.arcadecontrols.com/index.php?topic=43728.0

They talk about 480i modes, but again I recommend 320p modes.

Some cards can do 320p modes, and some can't. Generally speaking most Nvidia and ATi plug-in cards past and present seem to work fine (a lot of people use the good old ATi Rage card from way back). Intel and SiS onboard graphics seem to have poor results.

2b) Linux + AdvanceMAME (aka: elvis' favourite way)
http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/

AdvanceMAME allows realtime on-the-fly generation of modelines under Linux. Using video output libraries such as SVGALib (my personal favourite - userland utilities and a loadable kernel module) and Linux's FBDev (needs to be compiled into the kernel) you can define the maximum and minimum modes your monitor supports, and AdvanceMAME will generate the necessary modeline within those boundaries.

The same caveats apply here as they do with the PowerStrip guide:
1) This is difficult for folks who don't know Linux very well
2) This could be dangerous for your monitor if you make a mistake
3) Some video cards can't support this, see the list of supported cards here:
http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/doc-cardlinx.html

A good introduction to doing this is here:
http://easymamecab.mameworld.net/html/linux.htm

3) The cheap yet ugly way: TV-out
TV-out is a standard feature on most video cards these days. And most video cards that use TV-out use the superior S-Video. S-Video is far superior in picture quality to the yellow-plug composite system.

Plus, 21" (52cm) TVs can be head for peanuts. Most places will sell them for under $150. I saw a special on at "the good guys" just this week for 52cm TVs with S-Video input for $99.

The con of course is that S-Video is the dreaded 480i mode. Even if you select any other resolution (including 320x240), your video card will scale it and spit it out at 480i. Very stupid, if you ask me.

For best results, hard-set your desktop and MAME to 640x480 (use D3D without bilinear filtering instead of DDraw to avoid software filtering on an already blurry image).

480i and S-Video is notoriously blurry and flickery. Direct RGB with 240p modes looks a hundred times better, but there is of course cost and effort involved. TV-out is definitely the "no brainer" alternative to screwing around with arcade monitors, but the end result is definitely not as authentic.

That's a lot of info there. I'll stop it here I think.


HOLLY MOLLY, Elvis you information machine you!

The Pinny Parlour
22nd June 2006, 09:41 PM
HOLLY MOLLY, Elvis you information machine you!


Be careful, Trav will accuse you of being a Dan Fan. :lol

Seriously though, that info is excellent. Well done.

Shock_And_Awe
22nd June 2006, 09:49 PM
Hi SirValient,
I grew up in the arcades and very familiar with many games from the 80's / early 90's and I can say that I honestly can't tell the difference between mame and the originals. A lot of guys here have heaps of technical knowledge and tend to notice things your average joe (like me) would never even notice. Framerates, sprites, ini files....mate just gimme a joystick and I'll play them no probs! I had a Black Tiger pcb in one of my cabs and next to it I ran the same on mame - still I couldn't tell the difference. I can see why guys like PCBs if they like the collectability of them, but as far as gaming goes....it's my vote for mame all the way!

Berty
23rd June 2006, 12:05 AM
I work with audio, so it makes a big difference to me. For instance, i cant stand the sound of mp3's and other people cant see what the big deal is. I can understand though that people like playing mame on cabs, hell im about to do something along these lines. But there are certain games that i just must have the original pcb of.

elvis
23rd June 2006, 03:21 PM
HOLLY MOLLY, Elvis you information machine you!
Cheers. I've been tinkering around with MAME for a while in a variety of configurations over the last 3 years or so, and there's a lot of options out there depending on your needs. MAME really is very versatile, but can take a lot of time.

My usual offers stand: anyone in Brisbane, I will come to your door and help you with a MAME cab for the price of a cup of coffee. Out-of-towners, I can help with .ini and .rc files of either various MAME builds or frontends as well as Linux and Windows setup over email, or any general advice here in the forums.

Shock_And_Awe
23rd June 2006, 04:12 PM
My usual offers stand: anyone in Brisbane, I will come to your door and help you with a MAME cab for the price of a cup of coffee
That's very generous of you Elvis....next time you're on the Central Coast gimme a yell 'cause I got a cup of coffee waiting for you:) - that is of course unless there just happens to be someone else around these parts that wants to do a deal on a cup of coffee:)

elvis
27th June 2006, 12:03 PM
That's very generous of you Elvis....next time you're on the Central Coast gimme a yell 'cause I got a cup of coffee waiting for you:) - that is of course unless there just happens to be someone else around these parts that wants to do a deal on a cup of coffee:)
Dunno if I'll be down your way any time soon.

What sort of setup are you concocting?