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Strangeways
13th June 2008, 03:52 PM
I poorly documented this restore in 2006 (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showthread.php?t=3087), and I thought I'd start a new thread with all of the additions for reference for Pinheads that want to "have a go" at these "in depth" restores. I have not restored another EM (to this level) as yet, but I have started a Pro Football, which is on hold - But will be documented here as well.

Jacks Open is a game a decided deserved a full restore. I started the restore about 2 1/2 years ago and it took me a year to restore. It used all the skills I had learn and some new techniques I pickup up along the way.

Background

I bought the cheap from a guy who wanted to sell the game with a Juke Box - a package deal. I had no interest in the juke box, but I wanted the pinball. So I drove over and picked it up. I set it up in my games room that night, and of course, like all EMs - It just worked.

Condition

Well - it worked ! The playfield was filthy, the cabinet was terrible - someone tried a repaint with house paint (why do people do this?), the backglass was very good, except a scratch on the outside of the glass.. What impressed me was the condition of the mechanics. The steppers, relays and score motor were "as new". The only really bad thing was that there was a coil the must of burnt the score reel at some time, as it was melted out of shape

Starting Point

After the excitement of getting it home had settled, I had this idea to restore the game as best I could. After a couple of days, and after some thought - I took it a step further and decided it needed a repaint.. Not satisfied - I then wanted the machine to be restored "Nearly In Box" (NIB)
Very Happy ... So there's the challenge ...

Here's the game the day I bought it.. A bit sad looking, and it needed some attention ;

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20004.jpghttp://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20007.jpg

The Journey

Since this game is finished, I'd like to post progress pictures from the first day, right up to the end result.. Kind of a journal..


First step was to remove the legs & head and have a good look around the structure of the cabinet and the paint work. Structure was ok - no repairs needed. But the paint work was CRAP.. Looked like crayons were used and a dry brush and crap paint were applied. On top of that - Some of the wood under the housepaint had reacted in some way and it looked more like bark off a tree. Nope... I'm painting this...

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%203%20012.JPG


I used Citrus Strip from Bunnings to strip the cabinet. No fumes, no mess and it washes off in water. I used two scrapers, one wide scraper to remove the paint, and other to scrape the residue off the first scraper. I had to do it twice in some sections as the red paint was really deep into the wood. It took 3 hours and I left the game in the sun for a few hours and waited a week before prepping it.

I tried a few different wood fillers on this cabinet, none that I was pleased with.. But I did fix most of the dints etc... Sanded with 150, 180, 320 then 600 before the first undercoat

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%206%20001%20small.jpg

I masked off the insides of the cabinet from the undercoat.

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%206%20002%20small.jpg

OK - I don't recall the number of undercoats, but I think it was four. We used 600 grit wet / dry between coats, and waited about 20 minutes between coats. I used Dad's compressor and paint guns - he has been doing this for years (spray painting) - so it was easy for him - and me !

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%206%20010%20small.jpg

The cabinet was left out in the sun for two hours, and then placed in storage for a week...

Playfield


Whilst the cabinet was getting a make over.. the playfield strip commenced. Everything was removed from topside. Boy was it dirty. First clean was with a wet rag, then nifti (sprayed on the wet rag). I spent the next 3 Days removing the ball swirl. I used ISOCOL from a chemist with 3 packets of chux magic erasers. Lots of care needs to be taken while doing this. There are sections that wore away the lacquer, and sections where the paint just lifted. Care needs top be taken here. I think it took 20 hours to get it perfect.

Before Pictures

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20010.JPG

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20014.JPG


Progress pictures - post cleanup with ISOCOL and MAGIC ERASER


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20035.jpg

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20041.JPG

While this was happening, I ordered EVERYTHING topside From Pinball Resource.

Bumper bodies, skirts, caps, flipper, posts, acorn caps, rubbers, nails, coils, rebuild kits, side rail nails, flipper buttons and housings, pincushions, legbolts... and heaps of other bits..

Sidenote - I PESTERED steve to remake the plastics set, and midway through the playfield clean, he emailed me with a release date.. So I ordered them as well !!

Next Update - Back to the cabinet repaint..

Strangeways
13th June 2008, 05:28 PM
This is the hardest part of the resto imho. LOTS of time and patience required. Unfortunately, I don't have detailed pictures of these steps, as I just forgot. The white base color was sprayed on in one long session. I think it has 3 coats - first was thin, then two thicker. The entire cabinet was painted and left to dry in the sun, then left for 2 weeks to dry. During the two weeks, I made the stencils. Here's how I did it;

Bought a roll of tracing paper, .005 Acetate sheets, black thin permanent marker, and an exacto knife.

Prior to the resto, I traced the entire cabinet onto tracing paper and I took heaps of pictures. Initially with pencil on the tracing paper and then thin perm marker. When it was time to create the stencils, you use the tracing paper image on the bottom, and secure it to the acetate sheet on top. Trace the section that you need to be cut out of the stencil to allow the paint to pass on to the cabinet. That's a BLACK stencil for the sides of the body, head, front of the body and head. The the same for RED. So that's 12 stencils in all..Time consuming, and you need to be accurate. Then all the stencils need to be labeled and store them under a rug or the carpet so they stay flat....

The "Splatter effect"...

This is easy - but you need to test on a piece of cardboard.. All Gottliebs of this era had little specs of black paint all over the cabinet - The story is that the specks detract the eye from the lack of registration of the stencils and the over spray and under spray. When researching the way the original cabinet was painted, a thin sheet of brass was held against the cab and then the color was sprayed through the brass stencil. Then the next color was sprayed. So stenciling a cabinet from the factory in the old days took minutes, not hours. But there was always overspray and underspray. The "splatter" was there to distract from these problems. So in faithfully restoring a cabinet, I wanted it as authentic and accurate as possible.

All that's needed is a toothbrush and thick black paint, although I thinned mine out and "flicked" the paint while the side I was "flicking the paint" was flat (horizontal) - that way, paint does not run. Dipping the brush into the paint than running your finger from away from you towards you along the brush "flicks" the paint randomly on the cab.. easy..

Once "splatter" is done, the RED is applied. I started on the sides. The cab must be on a flat surface with the side to be painted horizontal. The RED stencil is registered (important) on the side to be painted and then some 3M blue tape used to hold the stencil down. Mask off everything else around the stencil. Here's the secret - use large nuts, bolts, steel offcuts and anything heavy (get creative), and lay them on the stencil - this creates pressure around the edges - BUT - It keeps the end product faithful to the original, as there WILL BE overspray - because the stencil will not be completely flat..So it will look natural - not like the perfectly laser cut stencils...

Then, using a smaller volume spray gun, spray the red paint - thin coat first, then wait 5 minutes, another thin coat, than a thicker coat. All over in 10 minutes.. BEFORE the paint dries - remove the metal parts holding the stencil and carefully remove the stencil...It should come off nicely..

Repeat for all RED parts of the game...

Fast forward a week..

Repeat the process for BLACK...

Very time consuming - you need patience and a willing helper. After a week of storage..It was ready to come home. Here are the results ;

Side of the Cabinet


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20005.JPG


Front of the Cabinet


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20011.JPG


Front View - including the installation of polished parts


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20038.jpg


Side view with "splatter" !


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20051.JPG


Side view of the Head


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20052.jpg


Now it's just a matter of polishing and cleaning EVERY single part and installing them back on to the game...

Arcade King
13th June 2008, 05:43 PM
keep the updates coming nino :)

pinnies4me
13th June 2008, 06:58 PM
:023:

Drool!

illawarra_steelers
13th June 2008, 07:15 PM
I'm still waiting for you to come up and help me restore my 50s and early 60s pins :rolleyes

Seriously Nino - f**king awesome work my friend. I find you inspirational even after collecting and restoring old pins for 30 years.

Cheers

Tony

narf_
13th June 2008, 09:20 PM
cant wait to get into my old girl

keep the thread going strong

jyebow
13th June 2008, 10:05 PM
Great work Nino,
Good to see the Jacks Open resto again.
More inspiration for me to get stuck into one of my EM's.
Great to see you back mate.
cheers Steve.
ps: I haven't got back to the Golden Arrow but I'll keep you posted.

Strangeways
14th June 2008, 10:35 AM
The cleaning of the playfield took a lot of time and elbow grease. While the cabinet was drying, I started on the underside of the playfield. I replaced playfield contact switches where necessary, rebuilt the flippers using new coils, stripped and rebuilt the stepper units (bonus etc), rebuilt the bumper assemblies and tidied up any wiring.

The next part was easy - installing the new playfield parts. I think just about everything is new here except the ball arch and metal guides . The wooden siderails were sanded right down.

Here's a picture in between waxing the playfield before installing the playfield parts ;


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%202%20002.JPG


Notice the "flipper drag" - The only downside to this playfield. Not much that can be done about this without touch up and clearcoat. I never touch up or clearcoat EMs. New bushings are included with the flipper rebuild kits.

The YELLOW area under the targets is always a high traffic / wear area. After a good clean, it has come up really well. I used a sharpie to color the black circles around the inserts. This area was plagued with "ball swirl" - I'd say at least half the time was spent cleaning this area !


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%202%20003.JPG


The Target Bank was completely rebuilt - eve to the point of polishing the mechanism. I works perfectly. Here's a progress picture of the playfield;


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%202%20021.JPG


You can see the lines (very thin) where the paint raised and peeled off. Especially in the LHS topmost "heart" in the yellow section. There are also other areas in this picture that have raised paint ;


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%204%20002.JPG


Lower Playfield and the NEW Plastics Set installed !! I BEGGED Steve from Pinball Resource to remake these plastics as the plastic above the target bank is ALWAYS broken. Cost US$76 at the time. There's some nice "shine" just below the target bank.


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%204%20016.JPG


Here's what 4 coats of paste wax and buffing can do to a playfield. It's no clearcoat, but it is so smooth and shiney, it does give the impression that is is a clearcoat. Just hard work... Very Happy


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20018.JPG


Finished Playfield - With the apron installed and instruction cards. I scanned the cards, printed them on high quality paper and then laminated them. I've cheated for this shot as the game is actually turned on - but it is a great picture to showcase the results that can be achieved with hard work and some great new parts !


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20105.JPG


Next update - Cabinet completion !

Back on to the cabinet

I restored this game before I bought a tumbler. So every metal part, from assemblies to screws were hand polished and buffed where possible. Putting it back together meant checking 100's of photos I'd taken, and constant reference to other EM's I had access to at home. The lock down bar assembly was washed, scrubbed and buffed. It took almost a day to get it to shine - and it's a part that should never bee seen ! Chimes DO sound different when they are buffed and the rubber grommets are replaced.

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20042.JPG


The score motor is even polished !!!! All relays and switches were cleaned. A new power cable was installed. Every connector was painstakingly cleaned with 320 grit and a wire brush. All these little things ensured that when I switched the game on - it would work and be reliable.


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20083.JPG


Chimes and inside of the cabinet ;


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20085.JPG


Under the bonnet... EVERYTHING rebuilt !!!


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20087.jpg


Early shot of the insides of the front door;


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20090.JPG


Legs are NOS and polished along with leg bolts etc... Front door is regrained with windex and 320 wet/dry. Siderails are also regrained using a straight edge, sanding block and 320 wet / dry with windex. New siderail nails were used as well.


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20089.jpg


Next Update - Playfield competed !

felixthadog
16th June 2008, 11:10 AM
The cleaning of the playfield took a lot of time and elbow grease. While the cabinet was drying, I started on the underside of the playfield. I replaced playfield contact switches where necessary, rebuilt the flippers using new coils, stripped and rebuilt the stepper units (bonus etc), rebuilt the bumper assemblies and tidied up any wiring.

The next part was easy - installing the new playfield parts. I think just about everything is new here except the ball arch and metal guides . The wooden siderails were sanded right down.

Here's a picture in between waxing the playfield before installing the playfield parts ;

Notice the "flipper drag" - The only downside to this playfield. Not much that can be done about this without touch up and clearcoat. I never touch up or clearcoat EMs. New bushings are included with the flipper rebuild kits.

The YELLOW area under the targets is always a high traffic / wear area. After a good clean, it has come up really well. I used a sharpie to color the black circles around the inserts. This area was plagued with "ball swirl" - I'd say at least half the time was spent cleaning this area !

The Target Bank was completely rebuilt - eve to the point of polishing the mechanism. I works perfectly. Here's a progress picture of the playfield;

You can see the lines (very thin) where the paint raised and peeled off. Especially in the LHS topmost "heart" in the yellow section. There are also other areas in this picture that have raised paint ;

Lower Playfield and the NEW Plastics Set installed !! I BEGGED Steve from Pinball Resource to remake these plastics as the plastic above the target bank is ALWAYS broken. Cost US$76 at the time. There's some nice "shine" just below the target bank.

Here's what 4 coats of paste wax and buffing can do to a playfield. It's no clearcoat, but it is so smooth and shiney, it does give the impression that is is a clearcoat. Just hard work... Very Happy

Finished Playfield - With the apron installed and instruction cards. I scanned the cards, printed them on high quality paper and then laminated them. I've cheated for this shot as the game is actually turned on - but it is a great picture to showcase the results that can be achieved with hard work and some great new parts !

Next update - Cabinet completion !

Back on to the cabinet

I restored this game before I bought a tumbler. So every metal part, from assemblies to screws were hand polished and buffed where possible. Putting it back together meant checking 100's of photos I'd taken, and constant reference to other EM's I had access to at home. The lock down bar assembly was washed, scrubbed and buffed. It took almost a day to get it to shine - and it's a part that should never bee seen ! Chimes DO sound different when they are buffed and the rubber grommets are replaced.

The score motor is even polished !!!! All relays and switches were cleaned. A new power cable was installed. Every connector was painstakingly cleaned with 320 grit and a wire brush. All these little things ensured that when I switched the game on - it would work and be reliable.

Chimes and inside of the cabinet ;

Under the bonnet... EVERYTHING rebuilt !!!

Early shot of the insides of the front door;

Legs are NOS and polished along with leg bolts etc... Front door is regrained with windex and 320 wet/dry. Siderails are also regrained using a straight edge, sanding block and 320 wet / dry with windex. New siderail nails were used as well.

Next Update - Playfield competed !

****ing unbelievable, I am completely awe-struck! :023:

Matthew

PeterW
17th June 2008, 02:13 PM
Very nice pin!

Would you be interested in selling it?

Strangeways
17th June 2008, 02:58 PM
Very nice pin!

Would you be interested in selling it?

Peter - Sorry, It was sold about 12 months ago - To the second Collector who played it. He also owns the "Strikes and Spares" and "Genie" that I restored (resto threads are in this section as well) - I am 50% through a restoration on a Gottlieb "Pro Football", and I have another "Pro Football", "Sky Jump", "Volley" and "Spirit of 76" which will have the same level of work done. The first "Pro Football" is on hold until Summer, when I can spray the cabinet....

PeterW
17th June 2008, 03:27 PM
No probs, thanks.

I'd be very interested in the Sky Jump. I just checked it out on IPDB and when I saw the backglass had a flash-back to my youth. I must have played that one back in my teens.

When do you think you'd work on that one? Perhaps PM what type of price you'd put it?

Thanks heaps. :)

Strangeways
17th June 2008, 03:35 PM
No probs, thanks.

I'd be very interested in the Sky Jump. I just checked it out on IPDB and when I saw the backglass had a flash-back to my youth. I must have played that one back in my teens.

When do you think you'd work on that one? Perhaps PM what type of price you'd put it?

Thanks heaps. :)

I honestly can't say "when" or "how much", as it is in working condition, but I want to restore it when the plastics become available. It is missing the center plastic above the targets. I intend on restoring it after the Pro footballs and Volley are completed. It takes around a year to restore games to the level I'm happy with (Jacks Open), so it could be three years before I even start it. I rarely put a timeframe on the games because its a hobby, and things can change. Should I decide to sell it "as is" - I'll let you know.

PeterW
17th June 2008, 03:46 PM
OK, thanks! Do keep me in mind. I'd love to own a Gottlieb EM one day.

ktm450
17th June 2008, 04:40 PM
Awesome job, well done!

Strangeways
19th June 2008, 09:37 AM
Playfield is completely re assembled. New post, plastics set, rubbers, globes, acorn nuts, nails, flipper bats, lanes guides, targets, bumper skirts / bodies / caps. No stone unturned.

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20101.jpg


Stepper Units

A vital part of any restoration is to make sure the game works ! Rebuilding stepper units, target banks and any moving part is important is having a trouble free game. Steppers are important and are nearly always over looked. Ball count, bonus, player select etc.. all work together and you only need one small problem to throw out the whole game.

The process is simple. Remove the coil(s), take plenty of "before" pictures and check the tension on any winding springs. Count the number of turns, so that the same tension is returned when you re assemble. I strip every part off a stepper unit. Soak in alcohol, clean with a toothbrush and allow to dry. A drop of machine oil on the shaft, and then reassemble. Test the unit before placing back into the machine. Make sure it is behaving as it should. Then install the coil(s) and you're done. It takes about 1 hour per stepper unit - depending on whether it is full of grease and old oil !

Here's a picture of the credit unit - nice and clean.. and a bit polished :badgrin


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%203%20027.jpg


Head / Rear of the machine

Credit unit is installed back in the game, as well as the ball count unit. both cleaned and ready to work without problems for the next 30 years.. Notice the 4 Gliders on the rear of the machine - just a small item that can make the machine look great - but who looks at the back of the game anyway ? :o

Leg protectors are a must on a repainted cabinet. I had the old instruction and localization cards relaminated and stapled to the inside of the head. Pity I forgot to take a picture..

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%204%20025.jpg


Playfield protectors / noise reduction strips

Because I painted the inside of the cabinet, I didnt want the paint to be scratched every time the playfield was raised. So I went to bunnings and found a roll of felt strip with adhesive backing. I placed it on both sides of the playfield. This serves two purposes - The inside of the pin does not have the paint scratched AND the noise of the score motor and chimes are a little lower in volume ! Small touch - and it cost a couple of dollars...


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%202%20013.JPG


I just wrapped it around the top corners, and it made life easier while I was still working on the game;


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%202%20017.JPG


Next Update - Game completed..:cool:

Foot
19th June 2008, 12:32 PM
I like the side on shot with the playfield up, looks great!

con
19th June 2008, 01:15 PM
I must say the pics speak for themselves...nice restore

Have u done any work on your Medusa and Fathom pins?

hamish_nz
19th June 2008, 01:23 PM
WOW

ive inspired me to redo my EM's

Strangeways
19th June 2008, 01:28 PM
I must say the pics speak for themselves...nice restore

Have u done any work on your Medusa and Fathom pins?

Not yet, Con.

Medusa is playable, I could get away with just a "shop job" on it, but I can't do "shop jobs" - I end up going the whole hog... I have bought some parts for the restoration, and I will continue to amass the parts until I have everything. This machine is already a really nice game to begin with, so I expect it to be VERY nice when done. I'm hoping www.classicplayfields.com repro new plastics, as it always "freshens" the appearance.

Fathom was bought as a project. Playfield is not good, but that's what I wanted. Backglass and the body are excellent. I already have repro plastics from IPB, and I have to wait until later this year for the playfield to be reproduced.

Both restorations will be fully documented here.

I will also be doing a Stern Flight 2000, Bally Playboy and Gottlieb Pro football.

I might "pull out" a few past documented restorations - like my Stern Meteor and Gottlieb Solar Ride - just to have a thread going.. Hopefully others will post their restorations - I know a few talented guys out there that are a bit quiet !!!


WOW

ive inspired me to redo my EM's

EXACTLY why I document these restorations...For guys like yourselves to "have a go"......

...and because I like to "Show off" my games :tomato:tomato

narf_
20th June 2008, 12:28 AM
im glad at this thread

ive been done tinkering tonite and looks like so far i might of been lucky and it is getting close to semi working

Strangeways
25th June 2008, 08:19 PM
I lost track of the hours and the expenses on this game. It just had to meet my objective, and I'm pleased that I think I achieved that. This is my first attempt at a "Nearly In Box" restore at this level. I am SLOWLY working on another - A thread will commence soon..

Final pictures ;

The Rear of the Game

Often neglected.. The back door is polished, even though its still dull, that's the way it should look. New Gliders - for such a cheap part, they offer protection in case the game has to be stored.


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20116.jpg


Lock Down Bar

Why take a picture of a lock down bar ? - This is my favorite picture ( I have ~400 ).. The lock down bar took HOURS to clean and regrain - but it makes all the difference. A rewarding picture, and a reminder of the level of attention you can give to have an original look;


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%208%20004.JPG


The Head


The biggest problem other than the flipper drag - was the swirl marks on the outside of the backglass.. That just could not be fixed... The backglass was fine other than that...


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20097.JPG


Finale


Game finished. All done - Very pleased. It was purchased by one of the first pinheads that played it. It's had one problem in 2 years, that took 5 minutes to fix. The owner is very happy, and I get to start the next big project !!!


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Galaxy%201%20353.jpg


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%201%20112.JPG


All of the parts for this game was sourced from Pinball Resource, as they stock most parts you would need for an EM restoration, although lately, local suppliers are starting to stock parts.

This would be my "signature" EM Restoration, and I will be tackling quite a few EMs in the future. The next EM will be a Gottlieb Pro Football, which will be completed to this level, pending the availability of parts. As explained earlier in this thread, the game was sold and sits in a Collector's home. This collector also owns other games I have restored. You can view them here;

Strikes and Spares - http://www.aussiearcade.com/showthread.php?t=9649

Genie - http://www.aussiearcade.com/showthread.php?t=7415

Cheers and thanks for looking. Another resto thread on a classic Bally soon !

Nino

retropin
25th June 2008, 08:40 PM
Just awesome Nino.... BNIB indeed!

PeterW
26th June 2008, 08:17 AM
Mmmmmm.... pinball porn. :D

AskJacob
26th June 2008, 08:20 AM
That glass swirl is pretty interesting... how does it get there?

Reminds me of a car windscreen where the wipe blades are old and have grooved the windscreen.

You know windscreen places can polish swirl out right? I don't know how risky it would be for a backglass though:unsure but there's a thought anyway...

Cheers and a very very nice restore. My problem with machines is I can't let them go - so I can't 'invest' that quickly in them..... piece by piece, over time....

Cheers

Strangeways
26th June 2008, 09:05 AM
That glass swirl is pretty interesting... how does it get there?

Reminds me of a car windscreen where the wipe blades are old and have grooved the windscreen.

You know windscreen places can polish swirl out right? I don't know how risky it would be for a backglass though:unsure but there's a thought anyway...

Cheers and a very very nice restore. My problem with machines is I can't let them go - so I can't 'invest' that quickly in them..... piece by piece, over time....

Cheers

Yes - that swirl really annoyed me as I could not do anything about it. Was done during its days on location, at a guess. Someone had a really tough sharp object and etched some circles on the outside of the BG - you could FEEL the grooves in the glass when you ran your fingers across the surface of the glass.

You only noticed the swirl if the light reflected off the BG or, if you take a photo with the flash on.

narf_
26th June 2008, 09:19 AM
dam i thought you had gladwrap or something on it

id kill whoever did that if i was a op

Strangeways
26th June 2008, 09:24 AM
dam i thought you had gladwrap or something on it

id kill whoever did that if i was a op

My thoughts exactly....

I guess that when you buy a project machine, you buy 30 years of history - warts and all !!

It is only obvious when there is direct light on it - although I am curious about Jacob's point about polished out the "swirl". This is the only Backglass I've ever seen with this sort of problem.

AskJacob
26th June 2008, 09:25 AM
My thoughts exactly....

I guess that when you buy a project machine, you buy 30 years of history - warts and all !!

It is only obvious when there is direct light on it - although I am curious about Jacob's point about polished out the "swirl". This is the only Backglass I've ever seen with this sort of problem.

Its the glass equivalent of a novus 3-2-1 treatment...

---

wandering off topic - the trains here in Syd are getting badly vandalised - the little buggers have found that the corner of a 50c coin can scratch up toughend glass - and there is horrible looking scratched graffiti everywhere...

spacies
26th June 2008, 09:29 AM
Being normal glass it wouldn't be hard to polish the swirls out.
Talk to a good glass company. They will get it looking like new if you wanted to take the risk.

Strangeways
26th June 2008, 09:30 AM
Its the glass equivalent of a novus 3-2-1 treatment...

---

wandering off topic - the trains here in Syd are getting badly vandalised - the little buggers have found that the corner of a 50c coin can scratch up toughend glass - and there is horrible looking scratched graffiti everywhere...

Interesting - So would you have to take your backglass to a windscreen place. or can you buy the stuff "off the shelf" ?

AskJacob
26th June 2008, 09:33 AM
Interesting - So would you have to take your backglass to a windscreen place. or can you buy the stuff "off the shelf" ?

Now that I can't answer :) - I've never seen the products for sale to the public as such... (not that I have looked hard either :))

I'm pretty sure it is a bit of a 'special' job - I personally think I'd prefer an experienced person doing it...

spacies
26th June 2008, 09:43 AM
You could DIY.

I had a friend do a windscreen on a Yank Tank from the USA and it worked very well. He polished out some wiper marks. Saved himself $$$$

Give it a whirl on a scrap bit of glass. Use a random orbital sander with some 400 or 800 (depends on how bad scratches are and use wet paper), then work through 1200, 1600, 2000, 4000 and then Novus 3-2-1.

Let the sander do the work, so don't press too hard.
Let us know how you get on if you try it.

felixthadog
26th June 2008, 10:12 AM
wandering off topic - the trains here in Syd are getting badly vandalised - the little buggers have found that the corner of a 50c coin can scratch up toughend glass - and there is horrible looking scratched graffiti everywhere...

They have been doing that for years in Melbourne - on trains, trams, buses, shop windows, bus shelters etc. I'm sure it is more costly (and more difficult) to remove than paint, so I reckon the appeal to the "artists" is greater.

Matthew

narf_
26th June 2008, 02:43 PM
perhaps take it to the pros and see what they say

it be tough to find a nice replacement

i have been making enquires into home use only reproduction as a option in the future for this sort of thing

retropin
26th June 2008, 06:20 PM
Nino,

I may be able to help here, ive been a glassblower for nearly 25 years and have polished a bit in my time.

First up - DO NOT go into the glass with anything like an orbital sander - they work too fast and youll cause more damage than good. Polishing glass is done slowly ( well slower than an Orb Sander).

You have a decision to make - are you going to get the glass a perfect finish? if so you HAVE to polish down to the lowest level of the deepest scratch.

Do you want to just "clean it up a bit"?

The process would be the same for both, but one may be a lot of work and you may regret your decision.

Ok , to minimise lots of light surface scratches "T - CUT"on a cloth works well and should be done by hand.

To take the glass down to another level fine - very fine grade wet and dry can be used. Now this will create glass dust which is very hazardous to your lungs and cannot be got rid of! You will need a lubricant - the best is actually cheapo cooking oil. It will suspend the dust preventing it from floating in the surrounding atmosphere and it also gives a better polish. Never go in Dry - youll scratch it worse.
You may find your wet and dry will fall to bits - get the cloth stuff if you can.
Now this will grind down the level gradually taking the grooves away, but will do it smoothly.

Now to get a highly polished finish - you need CARBIDE POLISHING powder and polishing paper - a cloth just absorbs the powder and is no good.

There is also a trick here ill let you into. Because your glass is flat - you can speed up the process by using another flat surface. This can be done with both the T CUT and carbide Powder. Get another piece of flat glass of a size that is easily handled and put your medium between the two sheets of glass, you then use the smaller piece of glass to polish the backglass moving in a circular motion. Keep checking your work at regular intervals so you get an idea of progress made. Do not press down hard, the medium MUST do the work. And never let it run dry.

And be warned!!!!

1 piece of grit gets in there and you will cut new grooves and be back to square 1.

I guess you could silicon a handle onto the "cutting" glass to make a good tool for this.

BTW - Fine T CUT also takes out scratches on eye glasses too!

Carbide Powder and glass polishing paper can be bought from a lapidiary supplier - we have a few here in Brisbane. If we have a couple then im sure Melbourne would have at least a dozen!

Best of luck mate..

Gav

Strangeways
26th June 2008, 06:27 PM
Thanks for the advice guys, especially Gavin with the insight into the glass polishing.

I don't own the game anymore. It was sold over a year ago. The blemish on the glass is only highlighted when "broad daylight" or a camera flash captures it. I had to point it out to the buyer, and he struggled to see it until he ran his finger across it.

I have accidentally broken two backglasses in my time - Both were duplicate glasses of machines that I "upgraded" the glass on. Anyone that knows me is aware that I hate two things - handling backglases and rust :o

So I would not have even entertained the idea of repairing something the naked eye can't really see. That backglass was fine as it was :)

patric67
13th July 2008, 07:47 PM
it is an unbelievable restore. roughly how much do machines of this finish sell 4. the amount of man hours spent seems incredible. john

4_amusement_only
24th August 2008, 12:46 AM
Incredible work. I thought i went to detail for my 1968 Dixieland!

H@77y01
9th February 2009, 01:26 PM
I poorly documented this restore in 2006 (http://www.aussiearcade.com/showthread.php?t=3087), and I thought I'd start a new thread with all of the additions for reference for Pinheads that want to "have a go" at these "in depth" restores. I have not restored another EM (to this level) as yet, but I have started a Pro Football, which is on hold - But will be documented here as well.

Jacks Open is a game a decided deserved a full restore. I started the restore about 2 1/2 years ago and it took me a year to restore. It used all the skills I had learn and some new techniques I pickup up along the way.

Background

I bought the cheap from a guy who wanted to sell the game with a Juke Box - a package deal. I had no interest in the juke box, but I wanted the pinball. So I drove over and picked it up. I set it up in my games room that night, and of course, like all EMs - It just worked.

Condition

Well - it worked ! The playfield was filthy, the cabinet was terrible - someone tried a repaint with house paint (why do people do this?), the backglass was very good, except a scratch on the outside of the glass.. What impressed me was the condition of the mechanics. The steppers, relays and score motor were "as new". The only really bad thing was that there was a coil the must of burnt the score reel at some time, as it was melted out of shape

Starting Point

After the excitement of getting it home had settled, I had this idea to restore the game as best I could. After a couple of days, and after some thought - I took it a step further and decided it needed a repaint.. Not satisfied - I then wanted the machine to be restored "Nearly In Box" (NIB)
Very Happy ... So there's the challenge ...

Here's the game the day I bought it.. A bit sad looking, and it needed some attention ;

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20004.jpghttp://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20007.jpg

The Journey

Since this game is finished, I'd like to post progress pictures from the first day, right up to the end result.. Kind of a journal..


First step was to remove the legs & head and have a good look around the structure of the cabinet and the paint work. Structure was ok - no repairs needed. But the paint work was CRAP.. Looked like crayons were used and a dry brush and crap paint were applied. On top of that - Some of the wood under the housepaint had reacted in some way and it looked more like bark off a tree. Nope... I'm painting this...

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%203%20012.JPG


I used Citrus Strip from Bunnings to strip the cabinet. No fumes, no mess and it washes off in water. I used two scrapers, one wide scraper to remove the paint, and other to scrape the residue off the first scraper. I had to do it twice in some sections as the red paint was really deep into the wood. It took 3 hours and I left the game in the sun for a few hours and waited a week before prepping it.

I tried a few different wood fillers on this cabinet, none that I was pleased with.. But I did fix most of the dints etc... Sanded with 150, 180, 320 then 600 before the first undercoat

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%206%20001%20small.jpg

I masked off the insides of the cabinet from the undercoat.

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%206%20002%20small.jpg

OK - I don't recall the number of undercoats, but I think it was four. We used 600 grit wet / dry between coats, and waited about 20 minutes between coats. I used Dad's compressor and paint guns - he has been doing this for years (spray painting) - so it was easy for him - and me !

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%206%20010%20small.jpg

The cabinet was left out in the sun for two hours, and then placed in storage for a week...

Playfield


Whilst the cabinet was getting a make over.. the playfield strip commenced. Everything was removed from topside. Boy was it dirty. First clean was with a wet rag, then nifti (sprayed on the wet rag). I spent the next 3 Days removing the ball swirl. I used ISOCOL from a chemist with 3 packets of chux magic erasers. Lots of care needs to be taken while doing this. There are sections that wore away the lacquer, and sections where the paint just lifted. Care needs top be taken here. I think it took 20 hours to get it perfect.

Before Pictures

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20010.JPG

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20014.JPG


Progress pictures - post cleanup with ISOCOL and MAGIC ERASER


http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20035.jpg

http://www.users.on.net/~nzambello/Jacks%20Open/Jacks%20Open%207%20041.JPG

While this was happening, I ordered EVERYTHING topside From Pinball Resource.

Bumper bodies, skirts, caps, flipper, posts, acorn caps, rubbers, nails, coils, rebuild kits, side rail nails, flipper buttons and housings, pincushions, legbolts... and heaps of other bits..

Sidenote - I PESTERED steve to remake the plastics set, and midway through the playfield clean, he emailed me with a release date.. So I ordered them as well !!

Next Update - Back to the cabinet repaint..
Hi I'm a novice at forums and restoring pinball machines. I have also just purchased a Jacks Open Pinball that is in need of restoration. Looks like you have done a brilliant job in fixing yours.

I have just bought it off ebay and dieing to pick it up so I can start work on it.

Mine is in need of a new backglass and bumper caps and a really good clean. ny ideas where I can go to source these? Did you get the 3 packets of chux magic erasers from the chemist as well?

Hope I can learn from your valuable experience.

Cheers

Phil