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DKong
5th June 2006, 12:05 PM
I store my games in my garage and was wondering what sort of effect the weather would have on them, not to worried about heat as I am in Tassie but last night we had -2 c . Does freezing weather damage electrics? Garage is cement brick, core filled with a thick cement slab. No insulation under the colourbond roof except for the aluminum foil stuff. Has open beams. It is bloody cold down there at the moment . ( Have to layer up to play some games ) I have Pinballs and Arcade cabinets in there.

:unsure

Berty
5th June 2006, 12:14 PM
I think that excessively hot or cold whether can play havoc with capacitors, but so long as the machines are kept free from moisture i dont think that you'll have much of a problem.

DKong
5th June 2006, 12:33 PM
Thanks Berty
so its more the humidity..

Berty
5th June 2006, 12:47 PM
Yeah, when i power my machines up after a humid day you can hear the tubes make all sorts of noises due to small amounts of condensation building up on the high voltage componants.

But it is a minor minor problem as far as electronics are concerned. Dust can cause certain componants to overheat and fail too, so thats why when i get real dirty boards i give them a bath in the dishwasher. Again, the problem has to be pretty severe tp cause any sorts of real problems.

Humidity can be really bad especially if you cabs are made from chip board or similar. When i was looking for my first cab, i noticed that alot that were stored in sheds etc tended to have pretty bad swelling in the wood near their bases.

Smit
5th June 2006, 12:51 PM
I know Hard Drives are affected by cold... you have to get them to a certain temp before running them....
Dont know too much about electronics... But I do know we get alot of faulty parts/ PCs in for repair when there is a sudden cold snap (I work in a computer shop)... dry joints possibly???

Smit

TheYellowDart
5th June 2006, 04:09 PM
That'd make sense thesmit. The cold causing the solder to shrink causing a dry joint.

As has been said though it's mostly moisture you should be concerned about. My grandfather had a Fathom pinnie he kept on a verandah which had a roof but the sides were only protected by fly screen mesh and every time it rained it went tits up.

Arcade King
5th June 2006, 05:36 PM
That'd make sense thesmit. The cold causing the solder to shrink causing a dry joint.

As has been said though it's mostly moisture you should be concerned about. My grandfather had a Fathom pinnie he kept on a verandah which had a roof but the sides were only protected by fly screen mesh and every time it rained it went tits up.

You got it in 1. Moisture is the biggest worry, it can cause all sorts of problems like mould.

DKong
5th June 2006, 06:09 PM
Ok I know it sounds a bit anal but how can you measure moisture content in an area and what would be suitable humidity/moisture levels
Hate to do all this bloody work on my machines to find they are slowly deteriorating

MadMikeAU
5th June 2006, 09:45 PM
Ok I know it sounds a bit anal but how can you measure moisture content in an area and what would be suitable humidity/moisture levels
Hate to do all this bloody work on my machines to find they are slowly deteriorating

Go to your local PostShop, and get a weather station / clock for about $9. They have clock, temp, humidity, and air presure. I know cause I got one on my desk

Ric
5th June 2006, 10:07 PM
for pins, backglasses don't like changes in temp

the cold and heat expnads and shrinks the paint.

Paint on a backglass is only so elastic and then it can start to craze or flake

clear coat the glass if you are worried.

Ric

RetroGame
6th June 2006, 07:27 AM
That brings to mind a question I was going to ask, I was recently holidaying in the Whitsundays and the resort I was staying in had a arcade games room. The humidity level was quite high and I was wondering what effect this had on the running of these machines? Maybe some of our FNQ members could share ther experiences in maintaining arcade games and pins in the tropics.

Roxbury
27th August 2006, 12:04 PM
I am preparing to deck my shed out to make it a bit more resiliant to changes in temperature, moisture etc. It is a colourbond shed, 8 x 4.5m. I am thinking of lining the walls with some sort of batts, and lining the ceiling with that silver insulation foil stuff. Would it also be a good idea to get a couple of whirly gig things for the roof for ventilation? Does anybody else have good moisture reduction advice?

rottenpig
27th August 2006, 01:07 PM
whirly gigs are useless, you're better off putting a few big windows in. or leaving the door open.

@lien_Zed
27th August 2006, 02:33 PM
That brings to mind a question I was going to ask, I was recently holidaying in the Whitsundays and the resort I was staying in had a arcade games room. The humidity level was quite high and I was wondering what effect this had on the running of these machines? Maybe some of our FNQ members could share ther experiences in maintaining arcade games and pins in the tropics.



It does not bother poker machines.most poker machines have cpu fans and cabinet extraction fans as well to keep them cool.
the fans get replaced at pm time every few months if they are ceased or not spinning freely.

Prof
27th August 2006, 04:53 PM
Hate to do all this bloody work on my machines to find they are slowly deteriorating

What, faster then they are anyway?? :)


Electronics have storage temps in the specs. Most are around -20c to +90c . But the operating temp is different. So, let any overly hot or cold machines get to roof temp before switching on

MadMikeAU
27th August 2006, 05:17 PM
You could also get one of those closet camels for inside each cab. Maybe some for between cabs...:unsure

GameDude
27th August 2006, 07:19 PM
Ok I know it sounds a bit anal but how can you measure moisture content in an area and what would be suitable humidity/moisture levels
Hate to do all this bloody work on my machines to find they are slowly deteriorating

If your worried about moisture the go to woolies and get some 'ANTI-DAMP' moisture absorber, it comes as a little bucket and after a month if it is still empty you have no moisture problem, if it starts filling up then good work your on the way to preserving your valuble arcade collection! :D
As for the floor if its sealed then no problems, if its not sealed then support any machine that has a wood base with some of the large plastic supports for furniture, the ones that allow easy moving, this will keep them away from the potential moisture problem (It also save the splintering of the base when moved)

Hope that helps

IMPURE
5th September 2006, 01:06 PM
someone once told me to use a heater in the shed first to marm it up before using the arcades, im a dumbass so i believed it lol

Roxbury
18th January 2007, 10:28 PM
After noticing that some of my machines were beggining to show signs of mild corrosion on metal screws etc I though I would go all out and buy a dehumidifier for the shed. I ordered one of these link (http://www.dampsolutions.com.au/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/1/products_id/1) from Damp Solutions. After one nights operation (about 12 hours) it had already accumulated 3 litres of water! Anyway now after a couple of days, the slight musty smell has gone too. I can't believe how much water it captures from the air.

The guy who I ordered it from said that some dehumidifer packs (like Damp Rid) use a type of salt in them as well, and can cause corrosion as well. I used these before, they would eventually fill up with water, but as I said I noticed corrosion starting, so maybe you need to be careful with these things?