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View Full Version : Who here used a TV in their Mame cabinet?



dmworking247
8th November 2007, 10:38 PM
Since upgrading my Mame cabinet guts and being in the process of adding spinners, a good trackball and potentially a light gun... I'm kind of in pimp-my-cab mode :D

The 21" monitor is starting to look small, heheh... so I'm starting to think about a bigger screen but I'm also broke, so the only option I can see is a big TV from ebay that I'd probably need to de-case if I want to get maximum screen space.

My computer/video card has a TV-out (not S-video, just RCA)... do you think this will still be sufficient for all the emulation stuff? Obviously it means the cabinet wouldnt be as suited for browsing the internet or playing PC games like quake/etc, but oh well...

Who here has used a TV in their cabinet? What do you think the biggest (cased or decased) TV I could squeeze into my cabinet with 600mm (exactly) width? I'm thinking a de-cased 63cm TV, which is 24.8 inches...

Thats 3.8" more than the current screen... is it worth the trouble/cost/loss of resolution for non MAME stuff?

narf_
8th November 2007, 10:51 PM
my brother and i are about to do this with a converter in a 20 inch cab were planning a 51cm in there probably decased

and new teles are cheap as chips these days

dmworking247
8th November 2007, 10:53 PM
thing is though, 51cm = 20"... so you're no better off than a flat screen 21" monitor which you can get for under $50, unless you've already got the TV laying around....

You shouldnt need to de-case a 51cm...

narf_
8th November 2007, 11:03 PM
ahh cheers we have a 68cm too. dad went thru teles faster than he did cars over the years

his old arcade monitor died a week after getting the cab so he has finally decided to fit a tv in it a year and a half later

DKong
8th November 2007, 11:13 PM
A 59cm (23.2") fits easily into a 620mm(inside width) cabinet from experience, and impure has used 61cm (24") in the same size cabs (apparently they have the same mounting points)
check my fit in this thread
http://www.aussiearcade.com/showthread.php?t=7967&highlight=raiden&page=2
http://www.aussiearcade.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4535&d=1192519074 (picture)
The monitor is Vertical(59cm)but you can see the mounting points for a Horizontal(59cm), there is not much room either side from a 59cm Tube (cab measures 620mm inside across) so I think this would be as big as you could go.
Hope this helps

dmworking247
8th November 2007, 11:16 PM
It looks like you might have been able to squeeze a 63cm TV in there *just*, but alas, my cabinet is 600mm on the inside not 620mm.

Thanks for the pic... that helps.

MrQuan
8th November 2007, 11:55 PM
I was originally planning a 68cm TV for my MAME cab, I tried it out using the TV out on the video card. Wasn't too bad but the refresh or something really gave me haedaches that close.

Anyways, I ended up using a 29" arcade monitor instead, and it really looks much better. The picture quality is great and sharp. No more fuzzy reds, and it doesn't strain my eyes like the TV did.

If you can afford it, I would recommend an arcade monitor. I was easy for me as the 29" arcade tube fit where the 68cm tv tube was, so perhaps it something you can change over later anyways.

dmworking247
9th November 2007, 01:10 AM
How cool is this?

A cheap converter from VGA to either RCA or S-video... I've never seen one of these and didn't think it was possible? If it works, it makes a TV a much more accessible option for anyone wanting to make a mame cabinet.

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/VGA-TO-S-VIDEO-RCA-COMPOSITE-ADAPTER-CABLE-CBA0_W0QQitemZ320178924840QQihZ011QQcategoryZ41999 QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem

rock
9th November 2007, 06:06 AM
i am looking at tv optoins too would the net and pc games look ok on a 68cm?
it is more for mame?

MrQuan
9th November 2007, 07:11 AM
i am looking at tv optoins too would the net and pc games look ok on a 68cm?
it is more for mame?

In my experience the resolution needs to be really low, just to make text readable, so you'll be limited by that. Some arcadeish games wil be ok, internet won't really work, it's too clumsy at such low res.

DKong
9th November 2007, 08:49 AM
I was originally planning a 68cm TV for my MAME cab, I tried it out using the TV out on the video card. Wasn't too bad but the refresh or something really gave me haedaches that close.

Anyways, I ended up using a 29" arcade monitor instead, and it really looks much better. The picture quality is great and sharp. No more fuzzy reds, and it doesn't strain my eyes like the TV did.

If you can afford it, I would recommend an arcade monitor. I was easy for me as the 29" arcade tube fit where the 68cm tv tube was, so perhaps it something you can change over later anyways.

Or use a TV tube with a universal chassis from Jomac (as I did), the picture is awesome. Joey told me that TV tubes are a better grade than most Arcade monitors. Arcade monitors are usually B grade tubes whereas TV's have the A grade, plus second hand TV's are way cheaper than Arcade monitors

GEMINI
9th November 2007, 09:14 AM
SO the universal chassis is $145 + freight and it will work any crt tube?
that is cool
that is a good option.
are they hard to install?
are there instructions hanging around somewhere?

Brootal
9th November 2007, 09:27 AM
The last cab I picked up has a 63cm, but its 620 wide, think you'd be struggling to get a 63 in 600

elvis
9th November 2007, 09:31 AM
I was originally planning a 68cm TV for my MAME cab, I tried it out using the TV out on the video card. Wasn't too bad but the refresh or something really gave me haedaches that close.

TV-out from modern video cards is always interlaced. This appears very flickery, especially when standing close to the screen.

Sadly none of the video card manufacturers include TV-out chips that can be custom programmed - most of them spit out 480i by default, which isn't much fun. If they could be reprogrammed to send custom video modes, you could get near-perfect progressive-scan arcade quality out of them. :(

dmworking247
9th November 2007, 12:07 PM
So Elvis is that to say that TVs are not a good choice for MAme cabinets?

elvis
9th November 2007, 12:20 PM
So Elvis is that to say that TVs are not a good choice for MAme cabinets?

Everything has pros and cons. TVs are similar in resolution to arcade cabinets. If you can feed your TV a progressive scan signal (say if you have an RGB/SCART TV, or a YPrPb or S-Video TV and a RGB->YPrPb/S-Video converter) then you'll get a great picture.

Similarly, supergun style devices (lets you plug a game PCB into a TV) will give you arcade resolutions without an issue.

The fault lies more in PC video cards that only send interlaced images to the TV. That's what causes the flicker.

TVs are by far the cheapest outlay for screen size option. It all depends on what you want from your MAME cab, obviously.

dmworking247
9th November 2007, 12:40 PM
So if I have a card with S-video out and a TV with S-video in is that better? Or do I need these converters you're talking about too?

elvis
9th November 2007, 12:55 PM
So if I have a card with S-video out and a TV with S-video in is that better? Or do I need these converters you're talking about too?

Any modern video card with TV-out will always send an interlaced picture. It's not S-video itself that is bad, but rather the card's output DAC.

S-video cables can carry both interlaced (max 576i) and progressive scan (max 288p) signals. You just need hardware that is able to send those signals as a Luminance/Chrominance (ie Y/C, ie S-video) signal.

By (unconfigurable) default, all TV-out cards send interlaced signals. Even if you set your PC's desktop resolution to 320x240 (a perfectly acceptible progressive scan resolution for 15KHz devices), your video card will scale that up to 640x480 internally, and then send it as a 480i signal to your TV (causing massive amounts of flicker).

RGB to S-video converters merely take an RGB signal, apply a simple transformation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YCbCr#Technical_details) to it, and spit out the resulting changed colour/sync signal.

If you feed one of these devices a progressive scan mode, the same mode will come out the other end, just in the altered colour space.

The problem is you need one of these hardware converters (they can cost $100 or more), and you need to program your RGB video card to send 15KHz signals - either with tools like PowerStrip on Windows, or SVGALib on Linux, or with hardware like the ArcadeVGA. In that case, you could just as well look at getting a real arcade monitor, as you're going 90% of the way there anyway.

So as mentioned, there's no perfect solution. Everything has it's pros and cons. You can either put up with standard TV-out flickering interlaced signals, or you can add large amounts of complexity to your project to try and get a progressive signal.

If someone made a video card with TV out that either sent 15KHz progressive scan signals, or a driver that could be hacked to do the same, life would be peachy.

dmworking247
9th November 2007, 01:08 PM
Is this of any interest then Elvis? It seems to suggest there ARE video cards with 15khz TV output?

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/andrew.lewis5/arcade/video.htm

elvis
9th November 2007, 03:56 PM
Is this of any interest then Elvis? It seems to suggest there ARE video cards with 15khz TV output?

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/andrew.lewis5/arcade/video.htm

There are plenty of cards that can do 15KHz output (most Nvidia and ATi cards can). It's just that most won't by default because modern day PC monitors aren't designed to handle those resolutions. You'll need software to force them to do it. As mentioned, PowerStrip, SVGALib and Soft15KHz can all do that.

But again, this is out of the VGA-out connector. The TV-out connector goes through a separate proprietary RAMDAC that will upscan 15KHz modes back to 480i. So even if you buy a video card that can do 15KHz out, force it to do that via the software mentioned, then turn on TV out, you'll still get an upscanned interlaced image. Very silly design.

Of note, an ArcadeVGA is nothing more than a standard ATI desktop card with a custom BIOS chip that forces 15KHz modes out by default, and supplied Windows drivers that tell the Windows registry which new low-res modes are available. MAME then simply scans the registry for available video modes, and picks the closest one as it starts up.

The Pinny Parlour
9th November 2007, 04:21 PM
Of note, an ArcadeVGA is nothing more than a standard ATI desktop card with a custom BIOS chip that forces 15KHz modes out by default, and supplied Windows drivers that tell the Windows registry which new low-res modes are available. MAME then simply scans the registry for available video modes, and picks the closest one as it starts up.

I'm yet to see this BIOS on the high seas of the pirate internet. I wonder just how easy or difficult it would be to hack it for free and easy modding of any old vid card.

elvis
9th November 2007, 04:29 PM
I'm yet to see this BIOS on the high seas of the pirate internet. I wonder just how easy or difficult it would be to hack it for free and easy modding of any old vid card.

It would be trivial to dump the BIOS of an ArcadeVGA and force-flash it over a different ATI-based card.

Speaking for myself, I appreciate the work Andy from Ultimarc does, and would rather pay the totally reasonable amount he asks for for one of his cards, given that it will go into further research of arcade-related hardware.

In all honesty, you could dump the BIOS of any video card you please, pull out your favourite hex editor and start hacking your own hardware 15KHz card project. There's nothing to stop you there - that's precisely how the ArcadeVGA got started.

spacies
9th November 2007, 04:35 PM
I have a PC running via Super VHS into a 100hz CRT and the picture is nice.

dmworking247
9th November 2007, 05:22 PM
There are plenty of cards that can do 15KHz output (most Nvidia and ATi cards can). It's just that most won't by default because modern day PC monitors aren't designed to handle those resolutions. You'll need software to force them to do it. As mentioned, PowerStrip, SVGALib and Soft15KHz can all do that.

But again, this is out of the VGA-out connector. The TV-out connector goes through a separate proprietary RAMDAC that will upscan 15KHz modes back to 480i. So even if you buy a video card that can do 15KHz out, force it to do that via the software mentioned, then turn on TV out, you'll still get an upscanned interlaced image. Very silly design.


Well then if those software solutions change the VGA out to 15Khz (but not the TV-out), then use one of these (http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=320178924840&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=011) to convert the VGA plug to RCA/S-video? I assume that'd bypass the upscanning to 480i.

DKong
9th November 2007, 06:41 PM
I just use AVGA + JPAC + Arcade monitor or TV tube with Sharp Image Dual Res Chassis from Jomac. Easy

elvis
9th November 2007, 09:14 PM
Well then if those software solutions change the VGA out to 15Khz (but not the TV-out), then use one of these (http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=320178924840&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=011) to convert the VGA plug to RCA/S-video? I assume that'd bypass the upscanning to 480i.

That device you link to is not a colour space converter. It is a direct wire-to-wire connector. You would need a video card that supported Y/C output direct off the DB15 connector. I personally have never seen one that has done that.

As mentioned before, colour space converters usually float around the $100+ mark.

DKong
9th November 2007, 09:26 PM
Welcome back Elvis.,
So what would be your preferred method for hooking up a PC to an Arcade monitor(or maybe TV) What sort of monitor/video card etc.

The Pinny Parlour
9th November 2007, 09:36 PM
It would be trivial to dump the BIOS of an ArcadeVGA and force-flash it over a different ATI-based card.

Speaking for myself, I appreciate the work Andy from Ultimarc does, and would rather pay the totally reasonable amount he asks for for one of his cards, given that it will go into further research of arcade-related hardware.

In all honesty, you could dump the BIOS of any video card you please, pull out your favourite hex editor and start hacking your own hardware 15KHz card project. There's nothing to stop you there - that's precisely how the ArcadeVGA got started.

Ok. I like his work too. I purchased a JPAC awhile back.

dmworking247
9th November 2007, 09:45 PM
You're speaking an alien language Elvis, I'm going to stick to my 21" CRT :D

DKong
9th November 2007, 09:51 PM
Ok. I like his work too. I purchased a JPAC awhile back.

I wouldn't use anything else from experience AVGA(using windows on the 15khz screen), JPAC . A big plus is you don't have to change the cabinet, so it stays original. Just like plugging in a PCB (as long as its Jamma) . The money you save on changing wiring/ different monitor etc is saved. Andy from Ultimarc is one good guy for us Backyarders. Only way to go for an easy PC to Arcade monitor setup.
I had no windows experience and easily set it all up.
Andy should be Knighted King of MAME to Jamma

elvis
9th November 2007, 10:34 PM
Welcome back Elvis.,
So what would be your preferred method for hooking up a PC to an Arcade monitor(or maybe TV) What sort of monitor/video card etc.

For authenticity, you can't go past a real arcade monitor.

An ArcadeVGA is by far the easiest way to hook up your PC to an arcade monitor, but it's missing a few resolutions (I believe there's a few Irem games based on the m72 driver (http://www.mameworld.net/maws/driverinfo/m72.c) that are at 55Hz which the AVGA doesn't support).

The most authentic way by far is to used AdvanceMAME (http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/) with SVGALib, which limits your OS choices to Linux and DOS. The reason this is the best is that SVGALib allows you to define a maximum and minimum horizontal frequency and vertical refresh, and then it along with AdvanceMAME will create modelines on the fly.

A close second is using tools like PowerStrip on Windows or any of the million modeline calculators to manually configure Xorg on Linux to building your own modelines. It's just as infinitely configurable as AdvanceMAME, but the downside is you have to create every single modeline yourself (and there are quite a few).


You're speaking an alien language Elvis, I'm going to stick to my 21" CRT :D

If you want to read up on a bit of CRT theory, this is the best site for it:
http://easymamecab.mameworld.net/html/monitor1.htm

Understanding the difference between interlaced and progressive scan is just a small part of it. There's a bit to understand there, but it's good reading if you want to wrap your noggin around the hows and whys.

Zebidee
30th November 2007, 05:28 AM
I had many great experiences converting SCART input TVs into arcade monitors. I usually only use better quality euro TVs (eg Thomson, Grundig, Loewe, Philips, Sony). A good quality TV will give a very good picture, better than most arcade monitors. Colours are generally stronger to start with.

Most TVs offer better choice of video modes as well. For example, I rarely have a problem getting 288 line modes (for classic vertical games on horizontal) or Mortal Kombat (53hz) working properly on a TV, but usually have a lot more trouble with these on an arcade monitor unless I tweak lots of settings.

Professional Video Monitors (CRT) are within budgets these days, I've made a few arcade cabs with some Sony Super Trinitron CGA video monitors. The picture quality, sharpness and colour depth is simply awesome!

One issue with TVs is that they are designed for a larger overscan (black border) than an arcade monitor. You can usually adjust the picture geometry to remove overscan using service settings etc, but TVs are more limited in this regard than arcade monitors and you may end up compromising geometry slightly.

The other issue is that TVs are harder to maintain in the longer term, unless you use better quality TVs (there will always be service people around for the really good ones).

Brumaz
30th November 2007, 06:57 PM
I tried using a TV (51cm) running off the tv-out on an ATI video card. I couldnt stand the drop in quality. Games were pretty much playable, but any lists in mamewah etc were horrible to try and read, even after changing the font sizes. Ended up going for a 20" crt, and I have a 20" LCD for the next cab. I actually quite like the crisp pictures, even though they arent as "authentic"

If only 4:3 LCD's were bigger than 20".... :(

dezbaz
30th November 2007, 07:22 PM
I bought one of those little VGA lead to SVid thingys for my TV out from PC, and never was able to get it to work, on 3 different tellies. It was meant to sense the TV as new hardware but it didn't sense anything.

Good luck if you try it. Let me know if it works.

I also tried a RGB to TV converter, they are $24.00US or something, and the picure quality is only average too. (But that doesn't apply to your Mame cos It was a jamma board onto a TV)
Dezbaz

dmworking247
30th November 2007, 07:22 PM
If only 4:3 LCD's were bigger than 20".... :(

They might not be common but they do exist...

this might be a 22" 4:3 right here:
http://www.arc.com.au/?MONLGLCDL226WT

Brumaz
30th November 2007, 07:36 PM
They might not be common but they do exist...

this might be a 22" 4:3 right here:
http://www.arc.com.au/?MONLGLCDL226WT

nup, another widescreen.
generally, anything with a W in its product code is going to be wide :(

_Dan_
30th November 2007, 11:13 PM
I recently purchased a 63cm TV off Ebay for my mame cab, I'll let you know my experiences with picture quality after I pick it up :)

acejas
1st December 2007, 08:49 AM
I used a 68cm Konka TV and absolutely loved it. Ran Svideo with an old TNT2 card. Mamewah was FE and could read teh graphics perfectly. A big cab with a 20" just wouldnt have done it for me. I cant wait to make another (properly done) cab with this TV

Zebidee
1st December 2007, 10:57 PM
If anyone needs a VGA->SCART cable for their TV, I can make them at "mates rates" for aussie arcade members. :lol

I can make SCART cables with switching signals too, which can make it much easier for you to turn the TV on at the same time as your PC.

With SCART TVs, you can feed RGB signals directly into them and make them just like an arcade monitor. In fact, the quality is often much better than most arcade monitors. This is really the only way to get good quality results from a TV-cum-arcade monitor.

narf_
2nd December 2007, 12:24 AM
i scored a broadcast monitor for $5 that uses scart for RGB

picture is dam sharp via supergun better than monitors ive seen

elvis
2nd December 2007, 06:44 AM
If you're technically inclined, you can convert most TV tubes to 15KHz arcade monitors with a new chassis from Jomac.

Alternatively, GameDude have some great prices on arcade monitors:
http://www.aussiearcade.com/showthread.php?t=10502&highlight=gamedude

$229 for a 21". $299 for a 29".

You can feed a SCART signal into these (I run my PS2 through a GameDude 29" arcade monitor via SCART, and it looks shit-hot).

what_the
2nd December 2007, 07:40 AM
I am confused and awed by the whole arcade monitor area. I am not sure about the different signals.

I have an LAI upright (SF, MK generic) cab that I have put 21" VGA monitor into. While I am reasonably happy with the picture I would love to be authentic and use a proper monitor/chassis.

Will a 15khz monitor process the signal from an arcade vga card and look decent for the older schmups as well as the newer games?

Or would I need a multi signal monitor?

Any help clearing up my confusion would be appreciated.

elvis
2nd December 2007, 09:40 AM
1) There is no "C" in SHMUPS. It's short for "SHoot 'eM UPS". No "C" in sight.

2) Analogue CRT monitors draw "lines" across the widest part of the monitor ("horizontally", looking at a 4:3 display). The "resolution" of the horizontal line is a bit of a moot point when talking about the display itself, and as such we tend to talk about the vertical "resolution" as the number of lines a display can show. The word "resolution" has little meaning in analogue displays (it only makes sense when talking about digital information), as such you will hear a lot of talk about "lines" or "scan rates" ahead.

3) The VGA signal is 31KHz, or 640x480 pixels at 60Hz refresh (other modes available, but this is a common standard for digital devices and frame buffers), or 480p (480 lines, progressive scan - ie: show all 480 lines of a frame in one pass, 60 frames per second).

4) CGA signal is 15.7KHz, 320x240 pixels at 60Hz refresh (other modes available, but this is a common standard for digital devices and framebuffers), or 480i (480 lines, interlaced scan - ie show the odd 240 lines in one pass in 1/60th of a second, then the even 240 lines in the next pass in 1/60th of a second, effectively showing all 480 lines of a frame but in two passes, and effectively only 30 frames per second). Technically CGA is "240p", but this is a phrase not many people use or recognize, even though in the arcade world it is far more common than 480i, which is more popular in TV and modern game consoles like the XBox and PS2, as well as all modern TV-out cards on PCs.

Some monitors are fixed frequency, some are multi frequency. If a monitor (or more specifically, it's driver board/chassis) cannot do 15KHz, you cannot force 15KHz into it. Ditto for 31KHz, or any other frequency if the monitor can't handle it. You will either get a garbage signal (and potentially damage your monitor), or the monitor will simply shut down as a precaution (what most modern PC CRT monitors do, complete with "signal out of range" warning.

Arcade VGA devices can spit out signals anywhere from 15KHz up to 31KHz (maybe even further, I haven't checked. Seeing as they are just an ATI video card, it should be possible). You can run a standard 31KHz PC monitor off an Arcade VGA and use only 31KHz and above signals, but doing so would be pointless. Any video card can do that already.

If you want to run both 15KHz and 31KHz signals for both authentic "standard res" (CGA) arcade/MAME games as well as "hi res" (VGA) arcade games, or PC games, then you will need a multi-sync monitor capable of both those frequencies. Be aware that "multi sync" means different things to different people. To PC users, it usually means 31KHz up to about 90-110KHz in a floating range. To arcade people, it means 15.7KHz, 24KHz, 31KHz in fixed, preset ranges. Make sure you double check what the actual frequency ranges are, and don't use generic double-meaning terms like "multi sync".

MAME has the ability to use approximate modes, or if they aren't available it can scale a picture to suit a different mode. This is precisely what happens on most PC systems, as pictures 240 to 288 pixels tall are scaled to displays that are 1024 pixels high or more.

The end result of course are pictures that seem "too sharp" or "too blocky", as now what used to be a single, low-resolution pixel fills 4 or 9 high resolution pixels in a square block. While the amount of visual data hitting your eye is accurate enough, we as subjective humans can instantly see it is nowhere near as visually appealing as on a native display.

what_the
2nd December 2007, 12:23 PM
1) There is no "C" in SHMUPS. It's short for "SHoot 'eM UPS". No "C" in sight.

oops, must have been thinking the word "schmuck" in the back of my mind when typing, cos that's what I feel like.:redface

But thank you for your clear and concise post once again Elvis. Cleared up a lot of questions in one.

elvis
2nd December 2007, 12:49 PM
oops, must have been thinking the word "schmuck"

It's perfectly understandable. Most shmup players ARE schmucks... myself included. :)

Simon_A
2nd December 2007, 01:07 PM
Okay this whole thread has thrown a spanner in the works for me. I have a 68cm TV that I am gonna use in my cab but from this thread I am now thinking about converting it to a arcade monitor.

So I need a arcade card for the PC, and a universal chassis from Jomac.
Is that all I need to do the conversion and really is it so much better?

elvis
2nd December 2007, 01:46 PM
Is that all I need to do the conversion
And the technical smarts / time to pull it off. Playing with monitors is high voltage and dangerous. Please be careful.


and really is it so much better?
Totally subjective personal opinion. I personally think it is "better", but I am by no means the final word when it comes to what the individual considers "good enough" for their home arcade.

The only way to decide is to try for yourself.

The good news is that you can use a 68cm TV with a TV out card, and if you don't like it, "upgrade" by swapping out the chassis and buying an ArcadeVGA. Find a local arcade (or friend with real arcade hardware and monitors) and compare the same game in MAME on TV-out with an interlaced display to the real deal. There's only one person who can decide which option is right for you. :)

Zebidee
2nd December 2007, 02:06 PM
Is that all I need to do the conversion and really is it so much better?

Simon, you are spot on. Elvis knows is stuff.

The 'conversion' really is worth it unless your TV already accepts SCART or RGB inputs. To my eyes, even component video input doesn't make the grade. This is entirely subjective of course .... :p

Simon_A
2nd December 2007, 02:09 PM
Thanks Elvis for the warning. Im well used to playing with high jolt equipment ;) but appreciate the warning.

Im very much a "do it right the first time" person. If the display looks better as a arcade monitor than the TV out route, then I will do it.

This is my very first cab that Im building and its a Ultimate II 4 player jobbie, so I love a challenge and I want it right first time round.

I am already collecting bits for Cab's 2 and 3. So the bug has well and truely bitten.

lexmark
29th December 2007, 02:49 PM
You guys might be interested in this .....I dont know ...BUT he seems to know what he's talking about

http://members.optusnet.com.au/eviltim/scart.htm

Moose74
2nd January 2008, 11:02 PM
For my mame project I had a spare 17"LCD, a 19"CRT monitor, a 21"CRT monitor and a 58cm TV to play with. I have tried all and have opted for the 21"CRT monitor. The particular 21" monitor I have has a better viewing angle than the TV. This is important to me as I have a couple of short-arsed rug rats that I am training to be introverted nerds like me. I am also using my cabinet for internet browsing and newish PC games like NFS, etc.

The downside is the monitor is 600mm deep and now my cabinet (under construction) is 1100mm deep.

Moose.

MadMikeAU
3rd January 2008, 03:34 AM
oops, must have been thinking the word "schmuck" in the back of my mind when typing, cos that's what I feel like.:redface

But thank you for your clear and concise post once again Elvis. Cleared up a lot of questions in one.

or maybe SEUCK (the Shoot Em Up Construction Kit) for the C64

elvis
3rd January 2008, 08:13 AM
You guys might be interested in this .....I dont know ...BUT he seems to know what he's talking about

http://members.optusnet.com.au/eviltim/scart.htm

The only problem with SCART for MAME is that it's fixed frequency. You will loose a few lines when playing certain games, as illustrated here (http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/blit.html).

lexmark
3rd January 2008, 11:29 AM
The only problem with SCART for MAME is that it's fixed frequency. You will loose a few lines when playing certain games, as illustrated here (http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/blit.html).

Well there you go ...thats interesting info...i'm glad you shared it

danielsoar
10th January 2008, 02:11 PM
I have 670mm wide cab with a 68cm tv in there (decased) with little room either side to spare, although i built the cab with that TV in mind, and im sure there are slightly slimmer models than the one i dumped in there.

Speaking of pimping cabs trackballs rock (thats what i got from my girlfriend for xmas this year)

rock
10th January 2008, 04:58 PM
got from my gf/f?
whats that a pimping cab or a track bal lol

Colt374
5th December 2008, 08:55 AM
The only problem with SCART for MAME is that it's fixed frequency. You will loose a few lines when playing certain games, as illustrated here (http://advancemame.sourceforge.net/blit.html).

And despite which, after looking through the work involved hooking up the scart connection with the auto frequency switch off and everything, who the hell would want to go to all that trouble? Bleurk!

Colt.

elvis
5th December 2008, 09:08 AM
who the hell would want to go to all that trouble?

Me. :)

Oh, and nice thread resurrect too. Had you waited another 30 days, it would have been a year since the last post!

OzStick
5th December 2008, 10:20 AM
So Elvis, now that this thread has been started up again are we taking it out for a spin????

elvis
5th December 2008, 11:00 AM
Yeah why not. I can talk 15KHz RGB all day. :)

Colt374
5th December 2008, 11:40 AM
LOL. I only stumbled upon this thread cause I was looking into monitor options.... and failed to notice the last post date. :redface

Oh well, it's good info for those who need it.

Colt.

Emohawk
5th December 2008, 12:11 PM
I used a TEAK 68cm with a scart connector looks at using the VGA to RGB wiring but stuck with Video in using 640x480 on windows XP witch is odd how hard it is to get the res on the new video card with 16bit + colours.

Found the +12v on pin 8 trick to auto switch to the AV input and it all looks sweet.

elvis
5th December 2008, 03:12 PM
I used a TEAK 68cm with a scart connector looks at using the VGA to RGB wiring but stuck with Video in using 640x480 on windows
SCART doesn't support 640x480@60Hz progressive scan (31KHz), which means you're probably sending an interlaced picture to your screen.

Emohawk
8th December 2008, 05:29 PM
interlaced I would say so. But it was the only res that the text was readable and clear in the games.

Still it works and that was the main thing and it saved the TV from the land fill. :D

Womble
10th December 2008, 10:53 AM
Planning on decasing my sturdy old TV, using the CRT and speakers in my cab, putting the chassis in my electronics junk drawer for components, dremmeling round the front of the case to use the original bezel (save me finding an arcade one), and putting the rest of the plastic casing in the recycling. About as green as possible really.